MargaretThatcherIronLady

                                        

                                       Margaret Thatcher
 

Some of the Articles on Margaret Thatcher on this INL News page

Margaret Thatcher death: latest reaction

Margaret Thatcher died of a stroke on Monday at the age of 87. Follow the latest reaction to the death of Britain's first female prime minister

Galloway's' tramp  the dirt' tweet a signal for her
(Margaret Thatcher) enemies to celebrate
by Tariq Tahir- Scotland Metro Newspaper: 9th April 2012 Page
While many people opposed to Margaret Thatcher and her ideas offered a sober assessment of her life, for others lingering hatred boiled over.
Respect MP George Galloway was among many who expressed their fellings on Twitter where he wrote: 'Tramp The Dirt Down'.

Parties rejoice at the passing of Margaret Thatcher

by Tariq Tahir- Scotland Metro Newspaper: 9th April 2012 Page
Celebrations were held yesterday to mark the death of Margaret Thatcher
In Glasgow, 300 people 'celebrated' the occasion in an event organised on Twitter. Anti-Capitists campaigners shouted from loudspeakers 'Maggie,Maggie, to replies of Dead, Dead, Dead'.
About 200 people  gathered in Brixton, south London - the scene of rioting in 1981 - for a party organised by a socialist group called Brixton Rebels.
A Facebook group said about 800 people had registered an interest in attending.
Police were at the event, which includes banners reading 'Rejoice, Thatcher is dead.'
Once Facebook user wrote, 'She may have been awful, she may have done a lot of damage to this country, but did she ever celebrate anyone's death by having a party? No, Grow Up.'
A similar part is being organised on Twitter for Trafalgar Square in Central London on Saturday.
A backlash later emerged on social media , with some users 'unfreindling' and ' unfollowing' each other following remarks about Lady Thatcher's Death.

Time for Scots to show respect for her family
First Minister of Scotland, Alex Salmond urged respect for the Thatcher Family. He said the news would prompt 'renewed debate' about her legacy in Scotland, but added: ' Today, however, the proper reaction should be respect and condolences to her family.'
The comments came as around 300 people turned up in an unofficial 'Death Party' in George Square -Glasgow, which was the scene of the Poll Tax Protests in the 1980's. Police Scotland said it was unaware of the 'party plans' and would' police accordingly'.
Scottish Labour leader Johann Lamont said: ' I came into politics to fight the ideology and values of Margaret Thatcher, which I believed damaged out country. But today is not a day to debate that. Today is a day to offer the deepest condolences to 
Margaret Thatcher's family, friends and all who loved her.
Earlier in the day, Scotland's only Tory Party MP paid his tribute to Baroness Thatcher. David Mundell said: ' She was an unwavering defender of our national sovereignty, a staunch defender of our principles of democracy and the rule of law'.
'Margaret Thatcher changed Britain for the better, but she helped change the world for the better too.' 

Viewpoint: What if Margaret Thatcher had never been?
Privatisation, finance boom, manufacturing decline, home ownership, union laws. The UK changed hugely in the 1980s. But how much of that would have happened if Margaret Thatcher had never taken office, asks historian Dominic Sandbrook.

Morrissey: still not Margaret Thatcher's biggest fan

Mozza releases statement claiming that 'no British politician has ever been more despised by the British people than Margaret Thatcher'

Margaret Thatcher: we disliked her and we loved it

What bound all opposition to Margaret Thatcher's programme was a suspicion that the grocer's daughter was intent on monetising human value

Above all, Margaret Thatcher Loved Britain by John Higginson Political Editor for Metro Scotland-Tuesday 9th April, 2013
BARINESS Thatcher, who dies yesterday, should be remembered most of all for her patriotism, David Cameron, The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom  said. the grocer's daughter who rose to take her place on the world stage was hated by some, but was a 'great Briton', David Cameron, The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom  told reporters outside No. 10 Downing Street.




Biography of Margaret Hilda Thatcher
Margaret Hilda ThatcherBaroness Thatcher
, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts, 13 October 1925 – 8 April 2013) was a British politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990 and the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 to 1990. She was the longest-serving British Prime Minister of the 20th century and is the only woman to have held the office. A Soviet journalist called her the "Iron Lady", a nickname that became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style. As Prime Minister, she implemented policies that have come to be known as Thatcherism.

Originally a research chemist before becoming a barrister, Thatcher was elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Finchley in 1959. Edward Heath appointed her Secretary of State for Education and Science in his 1970 government. In 1975 Thatcher defeated Heath in the Conservative Party leadership election to become Leader of the Opposition and became the first woman to lead a major political party in the United Kingdom. She became Prime Minister after winning the 1979 general election.




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Some of the celebrities, politicians and world leaders invited to Margaret Thatcher's funeral
 
 
Ten staff of The Ritz hotel in London where Baroness Thatcher died have been invited as thanks for the care the former Prime Minister received in her final days (PA)
 
 
12. Ten staff of The Ritz hotel in London where Baroness Thatcher died have been invited as thanks for the care the former Prime Minister received in her final days (PA)
 
Lord and Lady Lloyd Webber have been invited to attend the funeral (PA)
 
11. Lord and Lady Lloyd Webber have been invited to attend the funeral (PA)
 
 
Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and the Leader of the Opposition Ed Miliband are all expected to attend. All Cabinet members are invited - however Shadow Cabinet is not
10. Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and the Leader of the Opposition Ed Miliband are all expected to attend. All Cabinet members are invited - however Shadow Cabinet is not (PA)
 
Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown and his wife Sarah will attend Thatcher's funeral (PA)
 
9.  Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown and his wife Sarah will attend Thatcher's funeral (PA)
 
 
Dame Lady Mary Archer and Jeffrey Archer are both invited (Eddie Mulholland / Rex Features)
8. Dame Lady Mary Archer and Jeffrey Archer are both invited (Eddie Mulholland / Rex Features)
 
 
 
7. Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is expected to attend (Reuters)
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is expected to attend (Reuters)
 
7. Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is expected to attend (Reuters)
 
The last president of apartheid South Africa, FW De Klerk (right) will be attending. The Nobel Peace Prize Winner, freed fellow Nobel Prize Winner Nelson Mandela (left) from Robben Island and helped e
 
6. The last president of apartheid South Africa, FW De Klerk (right) will be attending. The Nobel Peace Prize Winner, freed fellow Nobel Prize Winner Nelson Mandela (left) from Robben Island and helped end racial segregation in the country. A representative of Nelson Mandela will also attend in the former President's stead (AP Photo/Obed Zilwa).
 
Dame Shirley Bassey will be attending (Matt Baron/BEI / Rex Features)
 
5. Dame Shirley Bassey will be attending (Matt Baron/BEI / Rex Features)
 
Barack and Michelle Obama are expected to attend and all living former Presidents have been invited (PA)
 
4. Barack and Michelle Obama are expected to attend and all living former Presidents have been invited (PA)
 
The Queen and her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, will attend Thatcher's funeral in a mark of respect. The only time the Queen has attended the funeral of a former Prime Minister was for Winston Churc
3.  The Queen and her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, will attend Thatcher's funeral in a mark of respect. The only time the Queen has attended the funeral of a former Prime Minister was for Winston Churchill in 1965 (PA)
 
 
Tony and Cherie Blair are pictured with Baroness Thatcher during a church service to mark the 25th anniversary of the Falklands Island conflict. The former Labour Prime Minister is due to attend the f
2. Tony and Cherie Blair are pictured with Baroness Thatcher during a church service to mark the 25th anniversary of the Falklands Island conflict. The former Labour Prime Minister is due to attend the funeral with his wife (PA)
 
 
Jeremy Clarkson, from 'Top Gear' is invited (Nils Jorgensen / Rex Features)
1.  Jeremy Clarkson, from 'Top Gear' is invited (Nils Jorgensen / Rex Features)





Russell Brand on Margaret Thatcher: 'I always felt sorry for her children'

Margaret Thatcher, the year she became leader of the Conservatives
Margaret Thatcher, the year she became leader of the Conservatives, and the year Russell Brand was born. Photograph: Keystone France
The actor and comedian recalls a bizarre recent encounter with the Iron Lady, and how it prompted him to think about growing up under the most unlikely matriarch-figure imaginable..
 
One Sunday recently while staying in London, I took a stroll in the gardens of Temple, the insular clod of quads and offices between the Strand and the Embankment. It's kind of a luxury rent-controlled ghetto for lawyers and barristers, and there is a beautiful tailors, a fine chapel, established by the Knights Templar (from which the compound takes its name), a twee cottage designed by Sir Christopher Wren and a rose garden; which I never promised you.
My mate John and I were wandering there together, he expertly proselytising on the architecture and the history of the place, me pretending to be Rumpole of the Bailey (quietly in my mind), when we spied in the distant garden a hunched and frail figure, in a raincoat, scarf about her head, watering the roses under the breezy supervision of a masticating copper. "What's going on there, mate?" John asked a nearby chippy loading his white van. "Maggie Thatcher," he said. "Comes here every week to water them flowers." The three of us watched as the gentle horticultural ritual was feebly enacted, then regarded the Iron Lady being helped into the back of a car and trundling off. In this moment she inspired only curiosity, a pale phantom, dumbly filling her day. None present eyed her meanly or spoke with vitriol and it wasn't until an hour later that I dreamt up an Ealing comedy-style caper in which two inept crooks kidnap Thatcher from the garden but are unable to cope with the demands of dealing with her, and finally give her back. This reverie only occurred when the car was out of view. In her diminished presence I stared like an amateur astronomer unable to describe my awe at this distant phenomenon.
When I was a kid, Thatcher was the headmistress of our country. Her voice, a bellicose yawn, somehow both boring and boring – I could ignore the content but the intent drilled its way in. She became leader of the Conservatives the year I was born and prime minister when I was four. She remained in power till I was 15. I am, it's safe to say, one of Thatcher's children. How then do I feel on the day of this matriarchal mourning?
I grew up in Essex with a single mum and a go-getter Dagenham dad. I don't know if they ever voted for her, I don't know if they liked her. My dad, I suspect, did. He had enough Del Boy about him to admire her coiffured virility – but in a way Thatcher was so omnipotent; so omnipresent, so omni-everything that all opinion was redundant.
As I scan the statements of my memory bank for early deposits (it'd be a kid's memory bank account at a neurological NatWest where you're encouraged to become a greedy little capitalist with an escalating family of porcelain pigs), I see her in her hairy helmet, condescending on Nationwide, eviscerating eunuch MPs and baffled BBC fuddy duddies with her General Zodd stare and coldly condemning the IRA. And the miners. And the single mums. The dockers. The poll-tax rioters. The Brixton rioters, the Argentinians, teachers; everyone actually.
Margaret Thatcher visits Falkland Islands Margaret Thatcher visiting British troops on the Falkland Islands in 1983: the war was a turning point in her premiership. Photograph: taken from picture library
Thinking about it now, when I was a child she was just a strict woman telling everyone off and selling everything off. I didn't know what to think of this fearsome woman.
Perhaps my early apathy and indifference are a result of what Thatcher deliberately engendered, the idea that "there is no such thing as society", that we are alone on our journey through life, solitary atoms of consciousness. Or perhaps it was just because I was a little kid and more interested in them Weetabix skinheads, Roland Rat and Knight Rider. Either way, I'm an adult now and none of those things are on telly any more so there's no excuse for apathy.
When John Lennon was told of Elvis Presley's death, he famously responded: "Elvis died when he joined the army," meaning of course, that his combat clothing and clipped hair signalled the demise of the thrusting, Dionysian revolution of which he was the immaculate emblem.
When I awoke today on LA time my phone was full of impertinent digital eulogies. It'd be disingenuous to omit that there were a fair number of ding-dong-style celebratory messages amidst the pensive reflections on the end of an era. Interestingly, one mate of mine, a proper leftie, in his heyday all Red Wedge and right-on punch-ups, was melancholy. "I thought I'd be overjoyed, but really it's just … another one bites the dust …" This demonstrates, I suppose, that if you opposed Thatcher's ideas it was likely because of their lack of compassion, which is really just a word for love. If love is something you cherish, it is hard to glean much joy from death, even in one's enemies.
Perhaps, though, Thatcher "the monster" didn't die yesterday from a stroke, perhaps that Thatcher died as she sobbed self-pitying tears as she was driven, defeated, from Downing Street, ousted by her own party. By then, 1990, I was 15, adolescent and instinctively anti-establishment enough to regard her disdainfully. I'd unthinkingly imbibed enough doctrine to know that, troubled as I was, there was little point looking elsewhere for support. I was on my own. We are all on our own. Norman Tebbit, one of Thatcher's acolytes and fellow "Munsters evacuee", said when the National Union of Mineworkers eventually succumbed to the military onslaught and starvation over which she presided: "We didn't just break the strike, we broke the spell." The spell he was referring to is the unseen bond that connects us all and prevents us from being subjugated by tyranny. The spell of community.
Those strikes were confusing to me as a child. All of the Tory edicts that bludgeoned our nation, as my generation squirmed through ghoulish puberty, were confusing. When all the public amenities were flogged, the adverts made it seem to my childish eyes fun and positive, jaunty slogans and affable British stereotypes jostling about in villages, selling people companies that they'd already paid for through tax. I just now watched the British Gas one again. It's like a whimsical live-action episode of Postman Pat where his cat is craftily carved up and sold back to him.
The Orgreave miners' strike in 1984. The Orgreave miners' strike in 1984. Photograph: Alamy
"The News" was the pompous conduit through which we suckled at the barren baroness through newscaster wet-nurses, naturally; not direct from the steel teat. Jan Leeming, Sue Lawley, Moira Stuart – delivering doctrine with sterile sexiness, like a butterscotch-scented beige vapour. To use a less bizarre analogy: if Thatcher was the headmistress, they were junior teachers, authoritative but warm enough that you could call them "mum" by accident. You could never call Margaret Mother by mistake. For a national matriarch she is oddly unmaternal. I always felt a bit sorry for her biological children Mark and Carol, wondering from whom they would get their cuddles. "Thatcher as mother" seemed, to my tiddly mind, anathema. How could anyone who was so resolutely Margaret Thatcher be anything else? In the Meryl Streep film, The Iron Lady, it's the scenes of domesticity that appear most absurd. Knocking up a flan for Denis or helping Carol with her algebra or Mark with his gun-running, are jarring distractions from the main narrative; woman as warrior queen.
It always struck me as peculiar, too, when the Spice Girls briefly championed Thatcher as an early example of girl power. I don't see that. She is an anomaly; a product of the freak-onomy of her time. Barack Obama, interestingly, said in his statement that she had "broken the glass ceiling for other women". Only in the sense that all the women beneath her were blinded by falling shards. She is an icon of individualism, not of feminism.
I have few recollections of Thatcher after the slowly chauffeured, weepy Downing Street cortege. I'd become a delinquent, living on heroin and benefit fraud.
There were sporadic resurrections. She would appear in public to drape a hankie over a model BA plane tailfin because she disliked the unpatriotic logo with which they'd replaced the union flag (maybe don't privatise BA then), or to shuffle about some country pile arm in arm with a doddery Pinochet and tell us all what a fine fellow he was. It always irks when rightwing folk demonstrate in a familial or exclusive setting the values that they deny in a broader social context. They're happy to share big windfall bonuses with their cronies, they'll stick up for deposed dictator chums when they're down on their luck, they'll find opportunities in business for people they care about. I hope I'm not being reductive but it seems Thatcher's time in power was solely spent diminishing the resources of those who had least for the advancement of those who had most. I know from my own indulgence in selfish behaviour that it's much easier to get what you want if you remove from consideration the effect your actions will have on others.
Is that what made her so formidable, her ability to ignore the suffering of others? Given the nature of her legacy "survival of the fittest" – a phrase that Darwin himself only used twice in On the Origin of Species, compared to hundreds of references to altruism, love and cooperation, it isn't surprising that there are parties tonight in Liverpool, Glasgow and Brixton – from where are they to have learned compassion and forgiveness?
The blunt, pathetic reality today is that a little old lady has died, who in the winter of her life had to water roses alone under police supervision. If you behave like there's no such thing as society, in the end there isn't. Her death must be sad for the handful of people she was nice to and the rich people who got richer under her stewardship. It isn't sad for anyone else. There are pangs of nostalgia, yes, because for me she's all tied up with Hi-De-Hi and Speak and Spell and Blockbusters and "follow the bear". What is more troubling is my inability to ascertain where my own selfishness ends and her neo-liberal inculcation begins. All of us that grew up under Thatcher were taught that it is good to be selfish, that other people's pain is not your problem, that pain is in fact a weakness and suffering is deserved and shameful. Perhaps there is resentment because the clemency and respect that are being mawkishly displayed now by some and haughtily demanded of the rest of us at the impending, solemn ceremonial funeral, are values that her government and policies sought to annihilate.
I can't articulate with the skill of either of "the Marks" – Steel or Thomas – why Thatcher and Thatcherism were so bad for Britain but I do recall that even to a child her demeanour and every discernible action seemed to be to the detriment of our national spirit and identity. Her refusal to stand against apartheid, her civil war against the unions, her aggression towards our neighbours in Ireland and a taxation system that was devised in the dark ages, the bombing of a retreating ship – it's just not British.
I do not yet know what effect Margaret Thatcher has had on me as an individual or on the character of our country as we continue to evolve. As a child she unnerved me but we are not children now and we are free to choose our own ethical codes and leaders that reflect them.
 
 

Russell Brand - what the hell do you know about Margaret Thatcher's mothering skills?

Margaret Thatcher's mothering skills have been called into question by Russell Brand. Apparently a woman can't dole out cuddles to her children at home and be a 'warrior queen' in the workplace. Get with the times, writes Emma Barnett.

Margaret Thatcher with her twins, Carol and Mark Photo: Daily Telegraph#
 
Emma Barnett
By Emma Barnett, Women's Editor 10 Apr 2013
 
Emma Barnett
By Emma Barnett, Women's Editor
4:16PM BST 10 Apr 2013
Well Carol and Mark Thatcher must be feeling a heck of a lot better now. Russell Brand, yes that greasy-haired leering man the BBC once rapped the knuckles of, has offered his sympathy to them.
What with it only being two days after their mother suffered a stroke and died, dear reader you could be forgiven for assuming Brand was offering his condolences during a rambling (albeit pretty well-written) post on The Guardian’s Comment is Free section. However, you would be wrong.
Instead, a loose-lipped Brand is telling the world how he has always pitied Baroness Thatcher’s children, for simply being her offspring. In the last 48 hours, since the Iron Lady’s death was announced, I have had many a strip torn off me on national TV, radio and of course on Twitter, for daring to suggest that Lady Thatcher was a feminist icon – whether she liked it or not.
And unlike the spineless ‘Ginger Spice’, Geri Halliwell, who deleted her respectful tweet marking Britain’s only female Prime Minister’s death (post a torrent of digital hate), I have continued to advance my position – abuse and all.
But thankfully, during all of my spirited debates on this topic, I am happy to report that no one has dragged up Lady Thatcher’s mothering skills as a point of contention. In fact, one thing people have in common on both sides of the Thatcher divide, is they wish to discuss her politics and legacy – not her ability to parent.
Moreover, the one thing even the most left-wing feminists cannot disagree with, is just how much Lady Thatcher is being remembered for being a Prime Minister (not a female Prime Minister) and her political decisions, as opposed to how she managed to ‘have it all’.
However, Brand just suitably lowered the tone with his contribution – something he is a pro at. He writes: “For a national matriarch she [was] oddly unmaternal. I always felt a bit sorry for her biological children Mark and Carol, wondering from whom they would get their cuddles.
“"Thatcher as mother" seemed, to my tiddly mind, anathema. How could anyone who was so resolutely Margaret Thatcher be anything else? In the Meryl Streep film, The Iron Lady, it's the scenes of domesticity that appear most absurd. Knocking up a flan for Denis or helping Carol with her algebra or Mark with his gun-running, are jarring distractions from the main narrative; woman as warrior queen.”
Well I hate to break it to you Russell, but warrior queens can also be good mothers. And those women doing full-time jobs up and down the country, and then coming home and knocking up their significant other a flan, while tending to the children’s homework, would beg to differ with your cheap summation.
As my Telegraph colleague, Judith Woods, writes today: “the outside world meddles in family dynamics at its peril. Lady Thatcher was a pioneering politician and a working mother before the term had even been properly coined”.
Only she, Denis (her beloved husband of 52 years), Carol and Mark have the right and knowledge to comment on her capacity as a mother. And even then, it’s not really any of our business – as much as we enjoy prying on famous people’s private lives.
Tony Blair is another hugely controversial British Prime Minister – and yet at no point when his political decisions are hotly debated, does anyone opine whether they felt sorry for his large brood in some dire need of cuddles – while he waged war in Iraq.
We need to move beyond the idea that a tough woman in the workplace cannot be a loving person in the privacy of her own home. While Brand is feigning an odd concern for where Carol and Mark Thatcher got their cuddles from, he could also do with updating his views of women’s multifaceted natures.

Related Articles

Margaret Thatcher: 'Yes, I wish I saw more of my children. But I can’t regret’

Lady Thatcher was seen by colleagues as a 'caring and loving’ mother – but the pressures of her role had a far-reaching impact on her family

Margaret Thatcher with her twins, Carol and Mark Photo: Daily Telegraph
Judith Woods
By Judith Woods 09 Apr 2013
 
When Margaret Thatcher came to power in 1979, she crisply observed: “Any woman who understands the problems of running a home will be nearer to understanding the problems of running a country.”
Viewed through the refracting prism of political life today, such remarks seem old-fashioned, naïve – laughable, even. Redolent as they are of maternal homeliness and domestic prudence, they are the sort of un-PC sentiments that would make any modern female politician, drilled in the stubborn dogma (some would say myth) of Westminster egalitarianism, wince.
But, as it transpired, Baroness Thatcher really was a new broom, sweeping through the nation determined to diligently balance budgets, declutter sclerotic national industries, and make Britain once again fit for purpose.
She saw no shame in making mention of her roles as wife and mother as well as leader; there are precious few MPs today whose first television interview would be conducted with their six-year-old twins sitting on the arm of the chair. But while her incontrovertible legacy as prime minister is in no doubt, her family life is more opaque.
Certainly, her marriage was a happy one. She met and married her husband Denis, a wealthy, divorced businessman, in 1951. From the outset he was aware of her fierce ambition and, easygoing by nature, was happy to pursue his business interests under the media radar.
Paradoxically, his portrayal as a gin-soaked reactionary in the Dear Bill letters of Private Eye worked in his favour, according to the couple’s daughter, Carol. Pigeonholed in public perceptions as a harmless buffoon, he didn’t distract or indeed detract from his wife’s high profile.
Carol and her twin, Mark, were born in 1953, when their mother was 27. Having studied chemistry at Oxford, she was training to be a barrister when she became pregnant, but with typical resoluteness, posted off her exam application from the hospital ward so as to ensure that she would qualify for the Bar. The family lived in Chelsea and the twins were installed in the nanny’s room – something that wasn’t unusual, given their wealth and status.
Within six years, Margaret had, by dint of talent and determination, entered an exceedingly male-dominated Parliament. After her barnstorming maiden speech in 1960, the aforementioned BBC interview took place with her twins. When her suitability for a front-bench career was mooted, she demurred. “Certainly until these two are a little older I couldn’t take on any more political responsibilities,” she said, and it was a decade before she became Education Secretary in the Heath government.
From the outset, Carol and Mark were very different. But Carol, now 59, has been outspoken about what she perceived as overt favouritism towards her brother, the elder twin by two minutes: “Mark was certainly the star.”
Yet in her book A Swim-On Part in the Goldfish Bowl, she depicts a traditional, even-handed childhood; her mother filling rolls for picnics and taking pains to personally wallpaper her children’s rooms. There were riding lessons and ski trips. Lady Thatcher’s press secretary, Bernard Ingham, recalls: “She’d often say 'weekends are for the family’”, and while he concedes that she was not a conventional parent, “she was certainly a caring and loving mother”.
But Carol has written: “As a child I was frightened of her. I always felt I came second of the two. Unloved is not the right word, but I never felt I made the grade.” Mark was sent to boarding school at the age of eight and Carol claims she was dispatched to prep school a year later as “there wasn’t much point in running a household for one child”.
She recently revealed in a BBC documentary that: “All my childhood memories of my mother were just someone who was superwoman before the phrase had been invented. She was always flat out, she never relaxed, household chores were done at breakneck speed in order to get back to the parliamentary correspondence or get on with making up a speech.
“You couldn’t distract her… she had tunnel vision in term of what ever she was doing.”
Carol, who was easily the brighter of the twins, may not have been close to her mother, but onlookers say her inference that she was somehow loved less did not chime with reality.
Former Cabinet minister Jonathan Aitken had a relationship with Carol when he was a fledgling MP and she was in her early twenties. He remembers that once, when the couple’s planned holiday was jeopardised by a three-line whip, requiring all Tory MPs to vote, Mrs Thatcher (then leader of the Opposition) quietly rearranged parliamentary business so as not to disappoint her daughter.
Carol went on to study law, then moved to Australia. She established a successful media career, although after splitting from Aitken she did not go on to marry or have children.
“I’ve written books. I won I’m a Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here!, but nobody will ever know me for being anything other than Margaret Thatcher’s daughter, so at the end of the day whatever I did was never good enough,” was her bruising verdict. It’s a painfully harsh judgment, but one, it must be remembered, that she makes on herself. It’s impossible to know whether her self-esteem issues stem from nature or nurture.
Mark, meanwhile, was not so prone to self-doubt. Having failed his accountancy exams, he gained something of a reputation as a playboy. When he went missing for six days in 1982 in the Sahara while driving in the Paris-Dakar rally, his mother was beside herself.
By the late Eighties he was a wealthy businessman – something that has puzzled commentators. Although there has never been any implication of financial impropriety, the consensus seems to be that, at some level, he enjoyed the benefit of his connections. His first marriage ended in divorce. His children, Amanda and Michael, live in Texas, with their mother, Diane, while he lives in Spain with his second wife.
He gained notoriety for his role in an attempted coup in Equatorial Guinea; his co-conspirator, Simon Mann, was sent to jail, but he plea-bargained and received a four-year suspended jail sentence and a fine.
“I see him. We maintain contact,” his sister says of their relationship. “We do not have Sunday lunch together, not like other families. But then we never did. Just because you’re related it doesn’t necessarily mean you see a lot of them. You need to have something in common.”
Perhaps it was this ongoing iciness that prompted Lady Thatcher to comment at a meeting with Tory grandee Lord Spicer in April 1995: “If I had my time again, I wouldn’t go into politics because of what it does to your family.”
This shocking admission was revealed in a set of diaries by Lord Spicer published in The Sunday Telegraph last year, but whether it was an off-the-cuff comment or a sincerely held belief isn’t known.
Subsequently, she told Saga magazine, in more measured tones: “Look, you can’t have everything. It has been the greatest privilege being prime minister of my country… Yes, I wish I saw more of my children. We don’t have Sunday lunch together; we don’t go on holiday skiing any more. But I can’t regret. And I haven’t lost my children. They have their lives. I took a different life.”
Lady Thatcher was devastated in 2003 by the death of Denis after 52 years of marriage. And in recent years, as her health deteriorated, friends observed that her children did not visit as often as they might.
Asked about her mother’s complaints of not seeing her grandchildren more often, Carol’s response was unflinching. “A mother cannot reasonably expect her grown-up children to boomerang back, gushing cosiness, and make up for lost time,” she responded. “Absentee mum, then gran in overdrive is not an equation that balances.”
Harsh words, but the outside world meddles in family dynamics at its peril. Lady Thatcher was a pioneering politician and a working mother before the term had even been properly coined. Retrospective feelings of guilt, or circumspection over the sacrifices demanded by the office of prime minister, would not be so very surprising.
And as the nation she led – and the foreign leaders she influenced – prepare for her funeral, there will be ample opportunity to pay tribute to Lady Thatcher, both as public figure and private person.
 

Margaret Thatcher was kindly, careful – and convinced she was always right

Gillian Reynolds on radio tributes to Baroness Thatcher and her own encounters with the Iron Lady.

Margaret Thatcher, pictured in 1975
Margaret Thatcher, pictured in 1975 
By Gillian Reynolds 09 Apr 2013

Margaret Thatcher was kindly, careful – and convinced she was always right

Gillian Reynolds on radio tributes to Baroness Thatcher and her own encounters with the Iron Lady.

Margaret Thatcher, pictured in 1975
Margaret Thatcher, pictured in 1975 
3:54PM BST 09 Apr 2013
Margaret Thatcher: coverage in full
Margaret Thatcher obituary
Margaret Thatcher death: latest reaction
Windy and cold in the north, warmer in the south. After 24 hours of programmes about the life and achievements of our first female Prime Minister I have come to the conclusion that anything said about Margaret Hilda Thatcher, 1925–2013, shows the same divisions in the country as the weather forecast. Your view of both will vary according to where you’re from.
I was listening to Radio 3 when I first heard of Baroness Thatcher’s death on Monday. It was just before 1.00pm. The bulletin that followed was, as is the way on Radio 3, short and clear. But this was a historic moment, one where the whole nation pauses to reflect so I retuned to Radio 4 and The World at One. It felt like a visit to the undertaker’s parlour. The presentational tone was reverently unctuous, as if the script were written by manuscript nib. The most vivid contributor was Lord Bell, close Thatcher adviser to the end, who spoke of her warmly, saying we would not see her like again. He sounded close to tears.
It was understandable. It isn’t easy to separate personal feeling on such an occasion. Yet it can be even harder for a listener. The emotional churn that comes when what you are hearing does not correspond with your own view is apt to find voice. It once did over gardens walls, it still does on radio phone-ins. It fires up Twitter and Facebook, explodes in kitchens and cars. “No,” we shout, “it wasn’t like that.” Then we sit and wonder whether, really, it was.
Radio, as the hours went on, certainly offered substantial food for thought. Whoever had planned the formal programmes to mark Baroness Thatcher’s death had done an impressive job. Peter Riddell, once political correspondent for The Times, now Director of the Institute for Government, presented Monday night’s Potency and Paradox (produced by Simon Coates), an hour of views from inside the corridors of power. Evidently, as some of the speakers are also now dead, the interviews had been collected over quite a long time but the range was impressive, including former members of Thatcher cabinets, advisers, civil servants, people who had been part of her closest circle.
Riddell’s thesis, diligently explored, is that there was always a paradox of head and heart within her politics. It showed in her personal kindness and compassion, it defined her political convictions. Early on, she could be persuaded, as Lord Carrington revealed. Yet the more dominant she became, the more isolated she was.
Andrew Neil’s special Radio 4 programme yesterday morning (produced by Paula McGinley) was built from voices of ordinary people, some who had known her in her earliest political career, some who only knew her public persona. Neil added in his own fond personal memories, of her friendship and guidance, his admiration for her courage, his regrets.
This was an unusual programme, a tapestry of everyday opinions, memories, insights. An innocence came out in the story of how she was desperate for nylons to go to her first Buckingham Palace garden party and, back in austerity 1951, the only way to get them was on the black market so that’s where her constituency worker got them. Not that young Margaret Roberts would have countenanced such a thing. Determined, brave, convinced, kindly but, as even Neil said, dangerously deaf to dissent.
Today yesterday, having only room for a bit of sports news alongside so many memories of Baroness Thatcher, ended with a brilliantly chosen trio of columnists, Sir Simon Jenkins former editor of The Times, Sir Max Hastings former Daily Telegraph editor and Eleanor Goodman, Channel 4’s former political editor. I think Hastings’s final thought should be framed and put on every newsroom wall. “Prime Ministers can only do what they do at the time.” In other words, yesterday never comes back.
I interviewed Mrs Thatcher twice. First in a constituency office in Warrington in 1975 when she had just been elected party leader. The second time was in Downing Street in 1986, when Michael Heseltine had just left the Cabinet and dangerous rumours were flying. She was everything these programmes said: kindly, careful and dauntingly convinced she was right about everything.
 
 

Baroness Thatcher: how she transformed a nation's finances

Margaret Thatcher oversaw a revolution in the way people invested in the stock market and property

Share traders - Baroness Thatcher: how she transformed a nation's finances
The 1980s saw a boom in the number of private shareholders Photo: GETTY
 
Emma Simon
By Emma Simon 08 Apr 2013
 
One of Margaret Thatcher's lasting legacies was to turn Britain into a nation of private shareholders.
Justin Urquhart Stewart of Seven Investment Management said: "This was an era of popular share ownership. People might have only owned shares in a couple of companies but this was the first time they held shares and made money from them."
Before the 1980s a small elite – of around 3 million people – owned shares privately. But the number boomed with the privatisation of state-owned utilities such as British Telecom and British Gas.
Mr Urquhart Stewart said that by the end of the 1980s there were almost 12m private shareholders in the UK, a number that would rise still higher with the demutualisation of the building societies, which started in 1989 when Abbey National floated on the stock market. Many others followed in the late 1990s.
Adrian Lowcock of Hargreaves Lansdown added: "In the 1970s just 7pc of people in Britain owned shares directly. By the end of the 1980s a quarter did."
These privatisations were hugely popular. When British Telecom was sold in 1984 two-fifths of the shares sold went to the general public, most of whom were novice investors. Around 2.1 million people invested in the company; they saw the value of their holdings double on the first day, such was the demand for the shares.
The British Gas privatisation in 1986 proved to be just as popular, backed by a TV advertising campaign urging viewers to "Tell Sid" about the offer.
According to Brian Dennehy of Fundexpert.co.uk, 4 million people applied for the shares, of whom 1.5 million received an allocation. Many sold their shareholdings within the first few days for a handsome profit.
Those that held these shares for the longer term have also seen good returns in many cases. According to the Brewin Dophin, British Gas has proved to be the most profitable of these privatisations. An investment of £100 would have been worth £1,246, by the end of 2011 – an increase of 1146pc. This is just the capital gain and does not include the value of any dividends paid. This is a far bigger gain than the growth in the stock market over this period.
These were two of the most high-profile privatisations. But during this period ordinary investors were able to buy shares in Cable & Wireless, British Aerospace, Britoil, Jaguar, British Steel, Rolls-Royce and British Airways – to name but a few.
The chart below shows how some of the popular privatisations have performed relative to the stock market.
A spokesman for Brewin Dolphin said: "In the 1980s, the Thatcher Government successfully developed the policy of selling nationalised industries into private ownership, or privatisation as it became known. However, back then the notion of selling national assets to the public was largely untested and there was uncertainty whether the public would support the issues.
"Thankfully this was not the case. In 1984, BT was the first well known public sector company to be sold and private investors welcomed the offer. More than 2 million people participated, keen to purchase the discounted shares offered at a price of 130p.
"This performance is impressive when you consider the renowned underinvestment in assets prior to privatisation, and the higher levels of staffing at the time of flotation. However, while not actually given away, they were deeply discounted floats and when the companies were exposed to the full force of competition they certainly improved their performance, resulting in very rapid growth from a low base."
Mr Dennehy said: "At the time, Only Fools and Horses was topping the TV ratings. Del Boy's catchphrase of 'this time next year we'll be millionaires' was also a mantra from the Thatcherite generation."
But it wasn't just the privatisations that encouraged wider share ownership. At the same time the Government made it more tax-efficient to hold shares by introducing personal equity plans (or Peps) in 1986.
Initially these plans allowed people to shelter £6,000 in a tax-free environment, by investing in investment funds, or later up to £3,000 in a "single company" Pep.
But many novice investors also learnt the hard way that share dealing wasn't a one-way bet, with the stock market crash of 1987. However, share prices recovered relatively quickly compared with subsequent booms and busts of the past decade.
Property
Ray Boulger of John Charcol said that as far as the housing market was concerned the Right to Buy scheme was Margaret Thatcher’s biggest legacy. This fuelled a significant increase in the proportion of people who were able to buy their own home.
But other factors helped reform the housing market over this period. It is easy to forget that when Mrs Thatcher became Prime Minister the UK still had exchange controls after the previous Labour Government’s mismanagement of the economy resulted in the humiliation of the UK having to go to the IMF for a bail-out in 1976.
Lifting exchange controls and opening up the UK capital markets had a far reaching impact on the UK economy, and this helped transform the mortgage market during the 1980s. That decade saw several new lenders enter to UK market and new types of mortgage becoming available. Instead of mortgage queues being the norm, borrowers saw the benefit of competition with an increasing choice of different rate options, such as fixed and capped rates, which had been almost unheard of previously.
Mr Boulger said: "Lenders actually had to start competing for business rather than most borrowers having to decide which lender to start saving with in order to qualify for a standard variable rate (SVR) mortgage a couple of years later. Until the early 1980s most banks were not active in the mortgage market and nearly all mortgage lending was done by the much larger number of building societies which then existed. The Building Societies Association operated a cartel, resulting in most lenders charging the same rate. This of course would be illegal today!
Until the mid 1980s it was impossible to raise capital by remortgaging and as until then nearly all lenders charged the same rate there was no point in remortgaging to get a better, or different, rate. Therefore until that time the remortgage market didn’t exist."
Pensions
Tom McPhail, the head of pensions research at Hargreaves Lansdown, said it was "impossible to overstate" the impact that Lady Thatcher had on Britain’s retirement saving culture.
"Back in the early 1980s, we still had a relatively paternalistic pension system, with the state and employers between them providing individuals with a guaranteed retirement income, risk free," he said. "Job mobility was relatively low compared to today, meaning that the final salary pension structure made sense for both employers and employees."
He added: "Through her battles with the unions, the privatisation programme, the abolition of compulsory pension scheme membership and the introduction of personal pensions, successive Thatcher governments fundamentally changed the entire social context. We now have a system of pensions which is largely based on private provision and, while the workplace still plays an important role, individuals’ retirement prosperity is more dependent today than at any time for decades upon the personal decisions which they choose to make.
"This emphasis on individuals bearing responsibility for the decisions they take, aided and supported by their employers, is a direct legacy of Lady Thatcher."

Key privatisations Mrs Thatcher’s premiership

1980 Amersham International Medical Diagnostics – £71 million
1981 Cable & Wireless – £71 million
1982 Britoil (BNOC) £549 million
1983 Associated British Ports £22 million
1984 British Telecom – £3.9bn for treasury
1984 Enterprise Oil – £392 million
1984 Jaguar – £294 million
1985 Trustees Savings Bank (TSB)
1986 British Gas – £5.43bn
1987 British Airways £900m
1987 Rolls-Royce £1.3bn
1987 British Airports Authority £1.28bn
1987 British Petroleum (sold in tranches)
1988 British Steel
1989 Regional water companies – £5.1bn
1990 National Power & Powergen – £2.23bn
1990 Scottish Power and Scottish Hydro Electric – £2.88bn
 

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http://www.economist.com/blogs/blighty/2013/04/margaret-thatchers-conservative-party


Margaret Thatcher's Conservative Party

A controversial legacy



THE former prime minister strengthened her party, was a fierce Atlanticist and grew ever more sceptical of a united Europe



                  Margaret Thatcher News and Photos


http://news.sky.com/story/1075599/margaret-thatcher-funeral-next-wednesday

Margaret Thatcher: Funeral Next Wednesday

Preparations for the funeral, under the code name Operation True Blue, get under way as the Queen confirms her attendance.

Margaret Thatcher

Video: Thatcher Funeral Divides Britain


Baroness Thatcher's funeral will be held at St Paul's Cathedral next Wednesday and attended by the Queen, it has been announced.

Britain's longest serving prime minister and the only woman so far to hold the role will be given a ceremonial funeral with full military honours.

It is the same status as that accorded to the Queen Mother and Diana, Princess of Wales, although some Tories want a full state ceremony.

The Queen also attended Sir Winston Churchill's state ceremony in 1965.

BRITAIN'S QUEEN ELIZABETH TALKS TO BARONESS THATCHER AT RECEPTION FOR WOMEN ACHIEVERS AT BUCKINGHAM ...
The Queen will attend Lady Thatcher's funeral next Wednesday

She will be accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh, and other heads of state and foreign dignitaries from around the world are expected to attend.

Lady Thatcher died at The Ritz in central London on Monday morning after suffering a stroke. She had battled ill health for a number of years.

Downing Street said the date of her funeral was agreed at a meeting attended by her family and officials from Buckingham Palace.

The day before the ceremony, Lady Thatcher's coffin will be transferred to the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft in the Palace of Westminster.

Metro
Newspaper front pages were dominated by the former PM's death

There will be a short service following its arrival before the coffin rests in the chapel overnight.

The streets will then be cleared for a procession taking the former leader's body from parliament to Church of St Clement Danes, the RAF Chapel on the Strand.

At the church, it will be transferred to a gun carriage drawn by the King's Troop Royal Artillery. The streets will be cleared for the procession on to St Paul's.

There the coffin will be met by a guard of honour as members of the armed services and pensioners of the Royal Hospital Chelsea line the steps.

A private ambulance drives Baroness Thatcher's body from the Ritz Hotel in central London
A private ambulance taking Lady Thatcher's body from the Ritz

The public will not be able to attend the funeral service itself but will be able to line the route of the procession.

Parliament is expected to be suspended for the event, which means the first Prime Minister's Questions since the Easter break could be cancelled.

Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude, who is in charge of some of the funeral arrangements, said: "There's already a huge amount of interest.

"There's a guest list and people will be invited over the coming days. It will be a big event. I think there's a huge amount of people - not just in Britain, but around the world - who will want to pay their respects to her."

A Union flag flies at half mast over the Houses of Parliament
A flag flying at half-mast over the Houses of Parliament

Some Tory MPs have expressed disappointment that the 87-year-old has not been granted a state funeral, as wartime leader Churchill was.

Peter Bone, MP for Wellingborough, said she should have "the highest kind of funeral that can be allowed".

"I would have thought a state funeral would be very appropriate. She was the first female prime minister. She was also the greatest peacetime prime minister we ever had," he told the Daily Mail.

However, her friends have indicated she did not want such treatment. She did not want to lie in state and thought a fly-past would be a waste of money.

Margaret Thatcher sits for a 70th birthday photograph at her London home
The former PM sitting for a 70th birthday photograph

For a state funeral to be granted to a non-royal, a parliamentary vote would have to be passed to permit the release of public funds.

Parliament is being recalled on Wednesday to allow MPs to voice their tributes, although the decision has angered some MPs.

Labour's John Mann questioned why taxpayers' money was being spent on bringing back MPs when tributes could have been paid next week, when parliament was due to resume.

"It is perfectly valid that, when a prime minister dies, MPs can pay tribute, but this could be perfectly properly done on Monday," the MP said.

Margaret Thatcher in a tank
Mrs Thatcher in a tank on a British base in Germany in 1986

He added that he would not be attending the session tomorrow, saying: "I will be at the dentist's."

Prime Minister David Cameron, who has already hailed Lady Thatcher as "a great Briton", is expected to give a statement to the Commons, followed by Labour leader Ed Miliband.

Mr Miliband said on Monday that while he "disagreed with much of what she did", he respected "her extraordinary achievements and her extraordinary personal strength".

The former Tory leader was hailed across the world as a towering politician, although there was also jubilation at her death from critics angry at some of her most controversial actions in office.

Flowers laid outside the home of Baroness Thatcher in Belgravia
Flowers outside her home in Belgravia, London

While some mourners laid flowers in tribute outside her home in Belgravia, London, others took to the streets to celebrate her demise.

Some 200 revellers took to the streets in Bristol, where six police officers were injured in a scuffle as bottles and cans were thrown.

There were similar scenes in south London, where more than 100 people gathered in Brixton - the scene of fierce riots in 1981, two years into Lady Thatcher's first term in office.

A crowd of 300 also gathered in Glasgow's George Square, where in 1989 protests at the introduction of the infamous poll tax took place.

A street party in Brixton celebrates the death of Baroness Thatcher
Crowds celebrating the death of the former Tory PM in Brixton

Many on the Left have condemned the social impacts of Lady Thatcher's policies encouraging the free market and stripping power from unions during her 11 years in power.

Her death was also welcomed by veterans of the Falklands conflict in Argentina, who blamed her for the deaths of the 649 troops who died during the 74-day war.

But the news was received with "great sadness" by islanders on the Falklands, who flew the union flags at half mast and hailed her intervention 31 years ago.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/margaret-thatcher/9983501/Margaret-Thatcher-dies-live.html

Margaret Thatcher death: latest reaction

Margaret Thatcher died of a stroke on Monday at the age of 87. Follow the latest reaction to the death of Britain's first female prime minister as MPs pay tribute at special Commons session.


• A "True Blue" committee is organising Baroness Thatcher’s funeral
• Mark and Carol Thatcher have returned to Britain
• Parliament recalled for special session this afternoon
• David Cameron praises Lady Thatcher as the leader who “made our country great again.”
• Ceremonial funeral to be held next Wednesday 
• The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh will be attending her funeral 
• Margaret Thatcher Telegraph coverage in full
• Email your tributes to thatchermemories@telegraph.co.uk

Latest

16.48 Cries of "sit down" as Mr Winnick continues his assault on Lady Thatcher's legacy. He says she had "brutal contempt" for people in Britain.

16.47 David Winnick heavily criticises Lady Thatcher. He says there was a "human cost" because of her policies and that some of them caused "immense suffering".

16.45 David Cameron has left the Chamber, according to the Telegraph's Tim Ross.

16.44 Labour's David Winnick stands up and says it would be "wrong" if he was not to speak freely about his views of Lady Thatcher.

16.40 Rowena Mason, the Telegraph's political correspondent, has a round-up of some of the best quotes from the House of Lords:

Lord Howard, former Tory leader and minister: "If she'd waited for consensus nothing would ever have happened. She saw what needed to be done and did it."

Lord Armstrong, former Cabinet Secretary: "She was nothing if not feminine.... [Mitterand] flattered her femininity. She recognised it and loved every minute."

Lord Ashdown, former Liberal Democrat leader: "Complex, extraordinary, magnificent, fallible, flawed, infuriating... If politics is defined by principles and the courage to hold to them she was the commanding politician and the greatest prime minister of our day."

Lord Tebbit, former Trade Secretary: "I left her, I fear, at the mercy of her friends. That I do regret."

Lord Fowler, former Health and Employment Secretary: "If you were prepared to be handbagged, she would oblige."

Lord Waddington, former Home Secretary: When you had endured flame and fire [of Lady Thatcher] you came out of it thinking you might have won but weren't absolutely sure

16.36 Read this blog by Iain Martin on David Cameron and Ed Miliband's speeches.

16.34 The Prime Minister is checking his phone as Sir Tony Baldry speaks...

16.33 Tory Sir Tony Baldry talks about Lady Thatcher's "prodigious work ethic". He says that Lady Thatcher always ensured that she was the best person in the room by being the best-prepared person in the room.

16.30 Tim Ross, the Telegraph's political correspondent, has some reaction from David Cameron from inside the chamber:

After Sir Gerald Howarth's first-hand account of serving in Thatcher's era, David Cameron turned on the front bench to congratulate him. The MP, whom Mr Cameron sacked as a defence minister in last September's reshuffle, wasn't paying attention as he took his seat at the very back of the chamber.

The Prime Minister had to wait - and he did - while MPs sitting between the two alerted Sir Gerald, who accepted Mr Cameron's approval with a thumbs up. Earlier, the PM had given similar congratulations to Conor Burns, despite the Tory MP repeatedly teasing his party leader during another speech that had all sides waiting on every word.

Mr Cameron is heading for two hours in the Commons listening to the debate, a long time for any PM to spend sitting in the House. But he has been rewarded with some fine contributions so far.

16.29 Labour's Diane Abbott reminds the House "very gently" that all these years after Lady Thatcher stood down there are still many people around the country who feel on the wrong side of the battles she fought. 
"This House should not give the appearance that their voice cannot be heard," Ms Abbott adds.

16.25 Cheryl Gillan, the Conservative MP for Chesham and Amersham, becomes the first woman to speak today in the Commons. Mrs Gillan hails Lady Thatcher as an inspiration and says her many feats "reflect a politician of substance whose like we may never see again".

16.21 Rowena Mason has this from the Lords:

16.18 Michael Meacher, Labour MP for Oldham West and Royton, hails Lady Thatcher's recognition of the issue of climate change. However, he goes on to criticise the unemployment and the the inequality seen during Lady Thatcher's leadership.

16.17 We've now had 11 backenchers speak in the Commons. Not one of them has been a woman.

16.16 Here's more from the Telegraph's Rowena Mason, who is watching the session in the Lords:

16.13 Sir Gerald HowarthI think she has been the salvation of the nation. I think she has restored our position in the world.

16.12 Another great quote from the Lords via Tim Shipman of the Daily Mail:

16.08 Sir Gerald Howarth was the first MP to an attempt an impression of Lady Thatcher. It wasn't bad at all...

16.07 Sir Gerald Howarth criticises Tony Blair: "She was no poodle to the United States." He then hails her work to end the Cold War, saying she helped to introduce "harmony across the Iron Curtain".

16.05 Tory MP Sir Gerald Howarth goes next. Shouts of "you tell 'em" Gerald as he tells the Labour benches that if the Tories had not privatised the telecoms industry they wouldn't have any mobile phones. He was getting frustrated with them playing with their smartphones.

15.59 Here is a short clip from the Prime Minister's tribute to Lady Thatcher:

15.57 Mr Cameron also told MPs an anecdote during his speech about when one Number 10 staffer wrote a hand-written note to the former Prime Minister asking her to "re-sign a minute".

But unfortunately the hapless official had left the hyphen out so the note actually read "please can you resign this minute".

Lady Thatcher replied: "Thank you dear, but I'd rather not."

15.54 Quote of the day so far from the Lords as tweeted by The Daily Mail's Tim Shipman:

15.50 Sir Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton, pays tribute to his "old adversary" but says she is more well-known as a "milk snatcher". He blames Arthur Scargill for allowing Lady Thatcher to win during the miners' strike.

15.49 This from The Telegraph's Tim Ross inside the Commons:

15.48 Mr Burns concludes by saying that Lady Thatcher was an inspiration to people all across the world.

15.45 Mr Burns apologises to the Prime Minister for telling an anecdode about a visit he paid to Mr Thatcher's home by taxi. He said that when he got out of the taxi, the driver refused to take his money and simply said: "Your fare tonight 'gov is you go in there and you tell her that we 'aint had a good'un since." Mr Burns said he went inside, told Lady Thatcher and she responded: "Well, he's quite right"

15.41 Mr Burns says that on Sunday evenings when he was on his way to visit Lady Thatcher at her home in Chester Square he would often bump in to Commons Speaker John Bercow on his way to the gym. That gets a good laugh from both sides of the House.

15.38 Conor Burns, the Tory MP who was a friend of Lady Thatcher's, says he feels a "deep sense of personal loss".

15.36 Rowena Mason, the Telegraph's political Correspondent, is watching the session in the House of Lords:

15.34 The tributes in the Commons have been going on for just over an hour, but we are yet to hear from a woman.

15.33 Alasdair MacDonnell, of the SDLP, now speaks. He says that as a democratic Irish nationalist he must register the differences that he had with Lady Thatcher. He says that Lady Thatcher left a "divisive legacy" in Ireland and that she caused "great pain, hurt and distress".
He says that Lady Thatcher incorrectly thought that issues in Ireland could be solved by using military force.

15.29 Peter Lilley then responds to criticisms made of Lady Thatcher. In response to the claim that she was "harsh", he says that Lady Thatcher "made us face reality and reality was harsh".
He also criticises the BBC for calling Lady Thatcher a "divisive" leader.

15.27 Peter Lilley, who wrote speeches for Lady Thatcher long before joining her Cabinet, says Lady Thatcher was "unforgettable" and "immensely kind". He also says she "could be remarkably diplomatic, not least in how she handled those who worked for her". 
He says she was in fact "cautious" in contrast to the legend that has been built up that she recklessly "took on all-comers". He says her trade union reforms were implemented bit by bit.
However, he says that once she was convinced that a policy was right in principle and right in detail she would "push it through with unswerving tenacity".

15.24 Angus Robertson, the SNP Westminster leader, says people in Scotland will "never forgive" the poll tax.

15.21 Sir Malcolm Rifkind talks about the disagreement Lady Thatcher had with her great friend Ronald Reagan when the USA invaded Grenada. He says that when she phoned the American President to "berate" him, he turned to his aides and said: "Gee, isn't she marvellous."

15.19 Tim Ross, the Telegraph's political correspondent writes this from the chamber:

It's a very strange atmosphere inside the Commons today. The MPs should all still be on their Easter holidays. Some Labour and Opposition MPs still are.

But plenty of others have turned out and were warmly praised for doing so by David Cameron. The PM, who betrayed some emotion as his voice cracked during his speech, acknowledged that he was little more than a boy when Lady Thatcher was already in Downing St.

Ed Miliband, also a child when she won the 1979 election, warmly praised her personal strength and courage. And while Mr Cameron's endorsement of Lady Thatcher's legacy is a given, Mr Miliband went further than he might have done, embracing many of her political values and policies, from reforming the economy, to privatisation.

The Labour leader even persuaded the Prime Minister to laugh when he joked that Lady Thatcher pioneered the green agenda long before anyone considered "hugging a husky".

But Mr Cameron, the butt of the joke, was laughing with Mr Miliband, not, as usual, at him. The normal rules do not apply today.

15.13 Sir Malcolm Rifkind, who served in Lady Thatcher's Cabinet goes next. He says it was "never dull". He says she was "intolerant of people who were woolly". He says she was the most "radical prime minister of the last few generations", adding that she recognised that Britain had gone the wrong way. He then quotes the novel The Leopard by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, which says that "if we want things to stay as they are, things will have to change".

15.12 Nigel Dodds adds: "How many times have we heard it said during her lifetime that like her or loathe her, at least you knew where Maggie stood, and people admire that in their politicians."

15.08 Robin Brant, of the BBC, says there was a lot of chatter in the chamber during Nick Clegg's speech:

15.06 Nigel Dodds, the DUP Westminster leader, is next and calls Lady Thatcher a "pioneer". He says that she "played an enormous role in changing fundamentally the world order".

15.02 Mr Clegg says that "Whether you liked her or disliked her it is impossible to ignore the indelible mark Margaret Thatcher...left on the world." 
Mr Clegg hails Lady Thatcher's support for European integration, pointing out her help in achieving the single market. "Margaret Thatcher was far from the cardboard cutout that is sometimes imagined," Mr Clegg said. He says there was something "extraordinary, even unsettling" about her political presence.

15.00 John Redwood ends by saying that Lady Thatcher showed the world "there is a better way". Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, is next to speak.

14.59 It is Important to note the smiles between Ed Miliband and David Cameron during their respective speeches. It's very unusual to see warmth between them in the Commons. It will not last long.

14.57 Here is a video of the statement Mark Thatcher's gave earlier this afternoon:

14.55 Tory MP John Redwood is the first backbencher to speak. He praises the speeches from Miliband and the Prime Minister and says Lady Thatcher was the "best boss" he ever had.

14.53 Mr Miliband goes on to criticise Lady Thatcher, for example over her original stance on Nelson Mandela. However, he says the debate about Lady Thatcher is part of what makes her great. He says that whatever you think, Margaret Thatcher was a "unique and towering figure". He adds that "we today remember a prime minister who defined her age".

14.51 Mr Miliband says that Thatcherism "departed" from the typical ideas of this time. "It was that approach that enabled her to define the politics of a generation," Mr Miliband adds. 
Mr Miliband adds that Lady Thatcher was "right to understand the sense of aspiration of people across the country." He also says she was right to defend the Falklands and that she was the first politician to warn about the dangers of climate change "long before anyone thought of hugging a husky".

14.49 Ed Miliband, the Labour leader, now speaks. "She also believed that ideology mattered," he says. "She believed and she showed that ideas matter in politics."

14.46 The full quote from the end of Mr Cameron's speech: "As Winston Churchill said, there are some politicians who make the weather and Margaret Thatcher was undoubtedly one of them. They say 'cometh the hour, cometh the man', well in 1979, came the hour, came the lady...she made the weather, she made history, and let this be her epitaph - that she made our country great again."

14.45 Mr Cameron moves on to the Falklands. He then says that so many of the principles she fought for are now part of the political landscape. He says that "Margaret Thatcher rescued our country from decline". He adds: "Let this be her epitaph: That she made this country great again."

14.44 The Prime Minister then goes on to talk about Lady Thatcher's respect for Parliament. "She loved and respected this place and was for many years its best debator," he says.

14.41 Mr Cameron gets on to Lady Thatcher's political legacy. He talks about the difficult, reformist agenda she undertook. "Success was never assured," Mr Cameron said.

14.40 Mr Cameron sends his condolences to Lady Thatcher's friends and family. Mr Cameron then hails the politicians "from all parties" who have made it to the Commons today, even if they "profoundly disagreed" with Lady Thatcher.

14.38 The Prime Minister says that Lady Thatcher spent much of her life threatened by the IRA. He says she was a "woman of contrasts". He tells the story of a female member of staff who was soaked while on a visit to Cornwall with the former prime minister and says Lady Thatcher ensured she found a new set of clothes.

14.36 David Cameron begins by saying it is "right" that Parliament has been recalled. He says her funeral will be a "fitting salute to a great Prime Minister".

14.35 The Labour benches look sparsely populated as the debate begins.

14.26 The special session of Parliament held in tribute to Lady Thatcher is about to start. A number of Labour MPs have boycotted it, despite senior figures in the party calling for as many members as possible to be in the Commons.

14.14: Sir Mark Thatcher has spoken for the first time about the death of his mother, saying that she would be "greatly honoured as well as humbled" that the Queen's is attending her funeral next week.

He said his mother had been blessed with "a long life, and a very full one", but her death was "without doubt a very sad moment".

"We have quite simply been overwhelmed by messages of support, condolence, of every type, from far and wide, and I know that my mother would be pleased they have come from people of all walks of life," he said.

Sir Mark added the messages of support following his mother's death would be a "source of encouragement and strength as we face the inevitable days ahead".

13.49: Here is a round up of next Wednesday's funeral plans by the Telegraph's political correspondant Rowena Mason.

13.41: Lord Heseltine, the former Conservative Cabinet minister who was instrumental in bringing an end to Lady Thatcher's rule, has refused to say if he will be attending her funeral.

Breaking his silence about her death the Tory peer said: "I am sorry to learn of Lady Thatcher's death. The illness of her last years has been cruel and very difficult. I send my deepest condolences to Mark and Carol."

But the man who challenged her to a leadership contest in 1990 has not responded to questions about whether he will be present at the event next Wednesday.

Margaret Thatcher and Michael Heseltine

13.37: David Cameron has said that he is open to ideas about ways in which Baroness Thatcher could be commemorated which have included a statue in central London and re-naming the capital of the Falkland Islands in her honour.

The Prime Minister's official spokesman today said Mr Cameron is aware of a "number of good ideas in this area", including a tribute in the Falkland Islands.

"The Prime Minister thinks its a good idea to think of how in due course Lady Thatcher could be commemorated," he said.

13.31: After mounting calls for a statue to commemorate Lady Thatcher in the heart of central London Westminster Council have said that they would look "favourably" on any application.

Cllr Robert Davis, Deputy Leader of Westminster City Council said: “I’m sure Westminster Council would look favourably upon an application for a statue for Baroness Thatcher, we would need to ensure it is sited in an appropriate place.”

The fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square was originally suggested as an appropriate site, but the Greater London Authority, who manage the space, have said that it would be unsuitable as there is an ongoing arts programme which is set to continue on the plinth for several years.

13.30: Further details of Lady Thatcher’s funeral have been released following a meeting of the “True Blue” committee which has been convened to organise the event.

Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude chaired the meeting which was attended by representatives of Lady Thatcher along with officials from No 10, Buckingham Palace, St Paul's Cathedral, the Ministry of Defence, the Foreign Office and the Metropolitan Police.

Further books of condolences are to be opened at the Guildhall and St Margaret's Church, Westminster, alongside those in the Finchley and Golders Green Conservative Association in her old constituency and at the museum in her home town of Grantham, it was decided.

The ceremonial funeral plans include soldiers from the Welsh Guards, which suffered heavy losses during the Falklands conflict - 32 Welsh Guards were among 48 members of the British forces who died when troop ship Sir Galahad was bombed by the Argentines in May 1982 in Britain's worst loss of the war.

Lady Thatcher's coffin will be taken on a Gun Carriage of the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery from St Clement Danes Church, the church of the Royal Air Force, in the Strand to St Paul's.

The Gun Carriage will be drawn by six horses, three of which are mounted, with a sergeant riding alongside, an officer riding in front and three dismounted troops on foot.

A Bearer Party made up of all three services will walk alongside the coffin, and will include those from ships, units and stations notable for their service during the Falklands Campaign.

Members will be taken from the Royal Navy/Royal Marines; the Scots Guards; the Welsh Guards; the Royal Artillery; the Royal Engineers; the Parachute Regiment; the Royal Gurkha Rifles; and the RAF.

12.59: Gordon Brown and his wife Sarah have confirmed that they will be attending the funeral of Lady Thatcher next week, although the former Prime Minister will not be in Parliament today owing to a prior commitment in France.

12.20: Former Prime Minister Tony Blair and his wife Cherie are to attend Lady Thatcher's funeral next week, they confirmed today.The couple will be among a number of high-profile guests expected to attend from across the world.

Planning is under way for the ceremonial funeral, which will have full military honours, at St Paul's Cathedral, next Wednesday, under an operation dubbed True Blue.

Downing Street is expected to begin releasing details of the guest list today, amid speculation that it could include former Soviet leaderMikhail Gorbachev and ex-US first lady Nancy Reagan.

Britain's former Prime Ministers - Baroness Thatcher and Tony Blair talk as they line up during a formal salute

12.15: More than 700 Armed Forces personnel drawn from all three services will take part in the funeral of Baroness Thatcher, Downing Street said today.

Lady Thatcher's coffin will be carried into into St Paul's Cathedral by bearers from units particularly associated with the Falklands War.

David Cameron's official spokesman confirmed that details of the cost to the public purse would be published after next Wednesday's service has taken place.

Her coffin will be carried by personnel from units particularly associated with the Falklands conflict, a No 10 spokesman said.

12.00: At least 10 MPs have declared that they will not be attending this afternoon's debate on Lady Thatcher, inclduing Labour MPs Lucy Powell, Chris Bryant, John Healey, John Mann, Dennis Skinner and Ronnie Campbell

Labour MP Sarah Champion also announced she would be absent, tweeting: “I'm not in Parliament today as I my time is better spent helping #Rotherham. Thatcherism tried to destroy our town & community, they failed!”

Her colleague added: "Neither will I be in Parliament today. Absurd waste of money and there also the cost of the funeral. Due back on Monday anyway!"

Labour Co-operative MP Gavin Shuker publicly announced that he would be elsewhere while Respect MP George Galloway declared that he will not be attending the re-called session, due to start at 2.30pm.

11.10: A former Labour minister has accused David Cameron of hijacking the death of Baroness Thatcher for political gain.

John Healey, the former treasury and housing minister in the Blair and Brown years, said the Prime Minister was using Parliament as a platform for Tory Party ideology after MPs were recalled early to pay tribute.

Mr Healey, MP for Wentworth and Dearne in South Yorkshire, an area hit hard by coal mine closures, said Mr Cameron's references to the Lady Thatcher's economic reforms in his tribute to her on Monday were "partisan" and "divisive"

Writing on the PoliticsHome website, Mr Healey, who is boycotting this afternoon's special session, said: "Parliament is being used today for narrow political gain by the Prime Minister, as a platform for his party's ideology not just eulogy."

He went on: "He's wrong to recall Parliament, and wrong to hijack it in this way. I will play no part and I will stay away, with other things to do at home in the constituency."

Mr Healey said today's Commons session would not be balanced as there would be no opportunity to debate Lady Thatcher's legacy.

He said her ceremonial funeral next Wednesday was "a full-scale state funeral in all but name", adding that "her legacy is too bitter to warrant this claim to national mourning".

A sand sculpture of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher made by sand artist Sudersan Pattnaik at the Golden Sea beach in Puri, about 65 kilometers from the eastern Indian city of Bhubaneswar (Picture: ASIT KUMARSTRDEL/AFP/Getty Images)

10.39: Foreign Secretary William Hague today defended the taxpayer contribution to the funeral of Lady Thatcher and the costs of today's debate.

He said Britain could "afford" to cover some of the costs of next week's events.

Speaking on BBC One's Breakfast programme, Mr Hague said: "It's right Parliament meets and commemorates such a leader of historic proportions in our country's history.

"She changed the course of our history and there have been many comments over the last few days from all corners of the political spectrum.

"When it comes to money, the rebate she negotiated for this country from the EU has brought us so far £75 billion - which is twice the size of our annual defence budget. I think that puts money in perspective... so I think we can afford to contribute to a funeral."

Lady Thatcher's family is also meeting an unspecified amount of the funeral cost

Mr Hague said he believed many people on the left's biggest problem with Lady Thatcher was "they could never beat her".

"They claimed to stand for millions of people but they could never get as many votes as Mrs Thatcher in an election," he said.

10.15: MPs returning from overseas visits to pay tribute to Baroness Thatcher can claim up to £3,750 in travel expenses, it was confirmed today.

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (Ipsa) said that, in line with normal rules, MPs were entitled to claim for their journeys back to Westminster following the recall of Parliament during the Easter recess.

For any MPs who are abroad on holiday or overseas visits there is a maximum of £3,750 which they can claim back.

That sum could include the cost of returning to their holiday destination if they choose to resume their break following recall.

An Ipsa spokesman said that some MPs could well have been out of the country when the recall was announced and that it was "reasonable" that they should be reimbursed for the cost of returning.

"If Parliament is recalled, MPs can claim the cost of getting to Parliament," the spokesman said.

10.06: Comedian Russell Brand has said he “always felt sorry” for Lady Thatcher’s children Mark and Carol.

Describing himself as “one of Thatcher’s children” after she took over the Conservatives the year he was born and was prime minister when he was aged between four and 15, said she was “so omnipotent; so omnipresent, so omni-everything”.

Writing in the Guardian he said: “For a national matriarch she is oddly unmaternal. I always felt a bit sorry for her biological children Mark and Carol, wondering from whom they would get their cuddles.

"Thatcher as mother" seemed, to my tiddly mind, anathema. How could anyone who was so resolutely Margaret Thatcher be anything else?”

Describing her as “an icon of individualism, not of feminism”, he added: “Her death must be sad for the handful of people she was nice to and the rich people who got richer under her stewardship. It isn't sad for anyone else.”

09.50: The manager of an Oddbins wine merchant has been suspended after promoting discounted Champagne on Twitter in the aftermath of Lady Thatcher’s death.

A tweet appeared on the north London store’s after the news broke, reading: “If for any reason anyone feels like celebrating anything we have Taittinger available at £10 less than usual at £29. Just saying...”

The tweet was deleted within hours, the Broadway reported, and the staff member suspended.

A link to a statement was then tweeted from the Crouch End store’s account.

It said: "The tweet in question was made by a member of branch staff without the approval or knowledge of the company's management. The tweet was completely inappropriate and in the worst possible taste.

“We would like to apologise profusely for the offence it has quite rightly caused. The member of staff responsible has been suspended with immediate effect pending a disciplinary hearing.”

09.30: The Metropolitan Police's Fixated Threat Assessment Centre, which monitors disturbed individuals who are obsessed with famous figures, has a list of Lady Thatcher fanatics who it plans to monitor at her funeral.

Obsessed individuals are to be vetted whilst other protesters could be banned from attending.

A multimillion-pound security operation, led by the Metropolitan Police, will be in place for next Wednesday’s ceremonial service, which will be attended by the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh.

There have already been “celebrations” following Lady Thatcher’s death at the age of 87 on Monday, and more are rumoured to be planned for the day of the funeral.

Dai Davies, a former head of royal protection at Scotland Yard, told the Times that although remaining aware of the potential for attacks by the IRA and other terrorist organisations, police are likely to be most concerned about a "fixated person with a psychological hatred of Margaret Thatcher".

Obsessed individuals may be visited to ensure that they do not pose a threat, as happened before the visit of Pope Benedict XVI in 2010.

09.15: Philip Hammond, the Defence Secretary, said it would be "very appropriate" to have a permanent memorial to Lady Thatcher in the capital.

He told the BBC: "I think it would be very appropriate to have a memorial to Margaret Thatcher somewhere in London. I haven’t personally given any thought yet to where that should be, but certainly the fourth plinth could be one of the options.

"Let’s look at that in slower time, I think these things are better thought about in slightly slower time after the event."

09.10: The death of Lady Thatcher has dominated the front pages of Britain’s newspapers for the second day running, here is a look at how it is being reported -

09.00: Further street parties have been planned to “celebrate” Lady Thatcher’s death, including one on Saturday night in Trafalgar Square where a notorious Poll Tax riot took place in 1990

The organisers have claimed thousands will turn up, and more celebrations are set to take place next Wednesday - the same day as her funeral.

On the night of her death hundreds gathered in Brixton, south London, Bristol, and Glasgow, resulting in three arrests and six police officers being injured.

Labour MP for Streatham Chuka Umunna has since condemned those who took to the streets.

Writing in the Sun he described the parties as “extreme bad taste” and “utterly disgraceful”, adding: “Those who came to Brixton to "celebrate" the death of Baroness Thatcher do not speak for or represent the people of the area.

“It was a disgraceful act. The overwhelming majority of people from Brixton have nothing but sympathy for a family that has just lost a loved one.

“Baroness Thatcher was a global political figure, and our first and only female Prime Minister. As Ed Miliband has said, she reshaped the politics of a whole generation."

Revellers with posters and bottles of milk and wine to celebrate the death of former prime minister Margaret Thatcher in Brixton, south London (Picture: REUTERS/Olivia Harris)

08.40: Lady Thatcher’s political opponent Lord Kinnock is set to snub her funeral, it has been reported.

The former Labour leader, who was defeated by Lady Thatcher in the 1987 election, has engagements that day and is unlikely to attend if he is invited, his office told the Sun. The guest list for next Wednesday’s ceremonial funeral has not yet been finalised.

The Queen has already confirmed that she will be attending. The last prime minister’s funeral she attended was that of Winton Churchill.

Sources have claimed that Lord Kinnock is likely to be invited. When asked if he would go an aide said: "Both of them have engagements on that day, but I would rather think not."

08.25: Jeffrey Archer has paid tribute to his "loyal, formidable friend"

He said: "We have lost the greatest peacetime prime minister of the last century. She and Reagan, probably their greatest moment, and she would say this, was the defeat of communism, though she had so many. She defeated the unions when they held this country to ransom over the miners’ strike.

“More than that though, she made Britain great again. When she came to power our standing in the world was on the decline. She once again made us a nation of importance in the world.”

Margaret Thatcher with Jeffrey Archer in 1998.

08.20: Rupert Murdoch has praised the "brave leadership" of Lady Thatcher, claiming Britain is "far more successful" as a result of her premiership.

Describing her as the “the woman who gave us back our backbone” in an opinion column for the Times, the tycoon praised her role in facing down the trade unions in the 1980s.

He said she made it possible for News International to survive a year of industrial action fighting against a move of operations to Wapping, East London.

Mr Murdoch said: "Mrs Thatcher understood that risk was a vital ingredient in a free enterprise society. She understood that such a society had to be led by a government with backbone.

"After the Second World War, in which the country lost a second generation of its finest men, Britain had created a dependency state. It killed off aspiration.

"In 1979 Margaret Thatcher set about its rehabilitation. She put the economy on a sound footing, she ended a culture of crippling strikes, she encouraged entrepreneurs to come here and set up their businesses.

"Thanks to her I have experienced in Britain many of my defining moments as a businessman, a Britain that is far more successful as a result of her brave leadership."

The News International boss said he was "inspired" by Lady Thatcher who was a "risk taker" who "believed in doing the right thing".

08.10: Lady Thatcher believed that David Cameron was too popular as she thought that doing things properly would entail dislike from the public, Conservative MP Conor Burns has revealed.

She criticised Mr Cameron for not being “far enough behind” Labour in the popularity stakes and believed that he should be pushing through policies despite opposition, it was said.

Mr Burns, who visited Lady Thatcher on a weekly basis, told the Daily Mail he had shown her poll in November last year which put the party nine points behind - two and a half years before the next election.

“She said, “That’s not far enough behind at this stage.” She sort of took a view that to do things that were right did entail unpopularity until people saw that what you were doing was working,” he said, giving a fascinating insight into the mind of Britain’s only female Prime Minister.

Remembering the confidence she had in her own convictions Mr Burns added: “She sort of took a view that to do things that were right did entail unpopularity until people saw that what you were doing was working.”

During one of her periods of lucidity despite her bad health she also expressed disapproval of the fact that the Government was a coalition and UKIP, he said.

Margaret Thatcher and David Cameron at the Great Briton awards

07.55: Sir Mark and Carol Thatcher have returned to London as their family gathers ahead of next Wednesday’s funeral. The twins, 59, have not yet issued a statement on their mother’s death.

Sir Mark was on holiday with his wife Sarah Jane Russell in Barbados when he was informed. Carol lives in Switzerland.

Sir Mark’s ex-wife Diane Beckett is expected to attend the service at St Pauls. It is believed that Lady Thatcher requested that both of his wives were present before she passed away.

Margaret Thatcher with her twins, Carol and Mark

07.40: London Mayor Boris Johnson has described Lady Thatcher as "brave", "principled" and "electric" as he tries to explain to those too young to remember what she meant for the country.

Writing for the Telegraph he said: " I cannot think of any other modern leader who has been so fierce in sticking up for her core beliefs, and that is why she speaks so powerfully to every politician in Britain today, and why we are all in her shade. In the end she was martyred by lesser men who were fearful for their seats.

"But by the time she left office she had inspired millions of people – and especially women – that you could genuinely change things; that no matter where you came from you could kick down the door of the stuffy, male-dominated club and bring new ideas. She mobilised millions of people to take charge of their economic destiny, and unleashed confidence and a spirit of enterprise.

"She changed this country’s view of itself, and exploded the myth of decline. She changed the Tory Party, she changed the Labour Party, and she transformed the country she led: not by compromise, but by an iron resolve."

07.28: A poll has found that Baroness Thatcher is Britain's most popular prime minister since the Second World War, eclipsing even Sir Winston Churchill. She was named as the best of the 13 prime ministers since 1945 by 28% of people, the poll YouGov poll of 1,893 adults found.

Sir Winston - Britain's leader during the Second World War and again from 1951 to 1955 - was in second place with 24% of the vote, and Tony Blair in third with 10%, the research for the Sun found.

Lady Thatcher was regarded as a "great" or "good" prime minister by 52% of people, while 30% deemed her "poor" or "terrible".

Almost half of those polled (48%) felt she left Britain economically better off, while 60% felt she left it more respected in the world.

More than half (51%) believed she created more opportunities for women, but just 36% declared she left society more free, and almost half (49%) said she left a less equal society.

Baroness Thatcher gladly adopted the moniker of the "Iron Lady" and 72% of those polled felt she stuck to what she believed in, with 66% saying she was a strong leader and 59% saying she was a decisive prime minister.

People also voted her being elected as Britain's first female prime minister as her greatest achievement, followed by winning the Falklands War and defeating the miners' strike and limiting the power of the unions.

The introduction of the hated poll tax was deemed her greatest failure, followed by her overseeing of the decline of mining and manufacturing and the privatisation of utilities such as British Telecom and British Gas.

Only in Scotland did more people think her a bad prime minister than good.

When asked about their overall feelings towards her, 47% of people felt Lady Thatcher's period as prime minister was good for Britain, and 36% as bad.

Even in death Lady Thatcher divides the nation, with outpourings of both mourning and celebration across Britain.

The Sun's poll found 50% of people back her being given a full ceremonial funeral at St Paul's Cathedral next week - the rest disagree or simply do not know what to think.

07.25: Since Lady Thatcher’s death on Monday the nation has been divided over her legacy, with hundreds gathering at parties to celebrate her passing. Here Peter Stanford looks at why the Iron Lady is still so demonised.

07.10: The House of Commons has been recalled for a special session to discuss the death of Baroness Thatcher. It is the first time that the Commons has been recalled since the riots swept the nation in August 2011.

David Cameron is expected to lead the debate with a tribute to Britain’s “greatest peacetime leader James Kirkup and Rowena Mason have reported.

Several MPs are set to boycott the session, which will begin at 2.30pm. John Mann, Labour MP for Bassetlaw, Ronnie Campbell, MP for Blyth Valley, and George Galloway, the former Labour MP who now sits for the Respect Party in Bradford, have all said that they will stay away.

Baroness Thatcher on the steps of 10 Downing Street with Prime Minister David Cameron (Picture: Eddie Mulholland)

07.00: London Mayor Boris Johnson has backed calls for a statue of Baroness Thatcher in a "prominent" central London location. Some have called for the commemorative statue to be placed in Trafalgar Square, which is dominated by military figures.

06.55: A "True Blue committee" has been convened to organise next Wednesday's ceremonial funeral, Steven Swinford has reported.

The group, bringing together MI5, National Security Secretariat, the police, Buckingham Palace, the Church of England, the Parliamentary authorities, Government departments and representatives of Lady Thatcher’s estate, met for the first time yesterday and will continue to meet on a daily basis until the funeral takes place.

06.50: Here is today's Telegraph's front page looking at the reaction toBaroness Thatcher's death by Michael Deacon.

In the Finchley constituency Lady Thatcher served for 33 years there is a sombre but patriotic mood. As they people paid their respects there was "no gushing hysteria, just quiet, dignified respect".

Lady Thatcher died at around 11am on Monday after suffering a severe stroke in her suite at the Ritz. She passed away peacefully aged 87, after battling poor health for more than a decade.

06.45: Good morning and welcome to the Telegraph's coverage of the death of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

Floral tributes to Baroness Thatcher are laid on the pavement outside her Chester Square residence in London (Picture: Anthony Upton)

Margaret Thatcher

Articles on Margaret Thatcher on this INL News page

Biography of Margaret Hilda Thatcher
Margaret Hilda ThatcherBaroness Thatcher
, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts, 13 October 1925 – 8 April 2013) was a British politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1979 to 1990 and the Leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 to 1990. She was the longest-serving British Prime Minister of the 20th century and is the only woman to have held the office. A Soviet journalist called her the "Iron Lady", a nickname that became associated with her uncompromising politics and leadership style. As Prime Minister, she implemented policies that have come to be known as Thatcherism.

Originally a research chemist before becoming a barrister, Thatcher was elected Member of Parliament (MP) for Finchley in 1959. Edward Heath appointed her Secretary of State for Education and Science in his 1970 government. In 1975 Thatcher defeated Heath in the Conservative Party leadership election to become Leader of the Opposition and became the first woman to lead a major political party in the United Kingdom. She became Prime Minister after winning the 1979 general election.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Thatcher

 

Margaret Thatcher death: latest reaction

Margaret Thatcher died of a stroke on Monday at the age of 87. Follow the latest reaction to the death of Britain's first female prime minister

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/margaret-thatcher/9983501/Margaret-Thatcher-dies-live.html

 

 

http://news.sky.com/story/1075599/margaret-thatcher-funeral-next-wednesday

 

Margaret Thatcher: Funeral Next Wednesday

Preparations for the funeral, under the code name Operation True Blue, get under way as the Queen confirms her attendance.

Baroness Thatcher's funeral will be held at St Paul's Cathedral next Wednesday and attended by the Queen, it has been announced.

Britain's longest serving prime minister and the only woman so far to hold the role will be given a ceremonial funeral with full military honours.

It is the same status as that accorded to the Queen Mother and Diana, Princess of Wales, although some Tories want a full state ceremony.

The Queen also attended Sir Winston Churchill's state ceremony in 1965.

The Queen will attend Lady Thatcher's funeral next Wednesday

She will be accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh, and other heads of state and foreign dignitaries from around the world are expected to attend.

Lady Thatcher died at The Ritz in central London on Monday morning after suffering a stroke. She had battled ill health for a number of years.

Downing Street said the date of her funeral was agreed at a meeting attended by her family and officials from Buckingham Palace.

The day before the ceremony, Lady Thatcher's coffin will be transferred to the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft in the Palace of Westminster.

Newspaper front pages were dominated by the former PM's death

There will be a short service following its arrival before the coffin rests in the chapel overnight.

The streets will then be cleared for a procession taking the former leader's body from parliament to Church of St Clement Danes, the RAF Chapel on the Strand.

At the church, it will be transferred to a gun carriage drawn by the King's Troop Royal Artillery. The streets will be cleared for the procession on to St Paul's.

There the coffin will be met by a guard of honour as members of the armed services and pensioners of the Royal Hospital Chelsea line the steps.

A private ambulance taking Lady Thatcher's body from the Ritz

The public will not be able to attend the funeral service itself but will be able to line the route of the procession.

Parliament is expected to be suspended for the event, which means the first Prime Minister's Questions since the Easter break could be cancelled.

Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude, who is in charge of some of the funeral arrangements, said: "There's already a huge amount of interest.

"There's a guest list and people will be invited over the coming days. It will be a big event. I think there's a huge amount of people - not just in Britain, but around the world - who will want to pay their respects to her."

A flag flying at half-mast over the Houses of Parliament

Some Tory MPs have expressed disappointment that the 87-year-old has not been granted a state funeral, as wartime leader Churchill was.

Peter Bone, MP for Wellingborough, said she should have "the highest kind of funeral that can be allowed".

"I would have thought a state funeral would be very appropriate. She was the first female prime minister. She was also the greatest peacetime prime minister we ever had," he told the Daily Mail.

However, her friends have indicated she did not want such treatment. She did not want to lie in state and thought a fly-past would be a waste of money.

The former PM sitting for a 70th birthday photograph

For a state funeral to be granted to a non-royal, a parliamentary vote would have to be passed to permit the release of public funds.

Parliament is being recalled on Wednesday to allow MPs to voice their tributes, although the decision has angered some MPs.

Labour's John Mann questioned why taxpayers' money was being spent on bringing back MPs when tributes could have been paid next week, when parliament was due to resume.

"It is perfectly valid that, when a prime minister dies, MPs can pay tribute, but this could be perfectly properly done on Monday," the MP said.

Thatcher in a tank on a British base in Germany in 1986

He added that he would not be attending the session tomorrow, saying: "I will be at the dentist's."

Prime Minister David Cameron, who has already hailed Lady Thatcher as "a great Briton", is expected to give a statement to the Commons, followed by Labour leader Ed Miliband.

Mr Miliband said on Monday that while he "disagreed with much of what she did", he respected "her extraordinary achievements and her extraordinary personal strength".

The former Tory leader was hailed across the world as a towering politician, although there was also jubilation at her death from critics angry at some of her most controversial actions in office.

Flowers outside her home in Belgravia, London

While some mourners laid flowers in tribute outside her home in Belgravia, London, others took to the streets to celebrate her demise.

Some 200 revellers took to the streets in Bristol, where six police officers were injured in a scuffle as bottles and cans were thrown.

There were similar scenes in south London, where more than 100 people gathered in Brixton - the scene of fierce riots in 1981, two years into Lady Thatcher's first term in office.

A crowd of 300 also gathered in Glasgow's George Square, where in 1989 protests at the introduction of the infamous poll tax took place.

Crowds celebrating the death of the former Tory PM in Brixton

Many on the Left have condemned the social impacts of Lady Thatcher's policies encouraging the free market and stripping power from unions during her 11 years in power.

Her death was also welcomed by veterans of the Falklands conflict in Argentina, who blamed her for the deaths of the 649 troops who died during the 74-day war.

But the news was received with "great sadness" by islanders on the Falklands, who flew the union flags at half mast and hailed her intervention 31 years ago.

 

Australian foreign minister claims Margaret Thatcher held 'unabashedly racist' views

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2013/apr/09/margaret-thatcher-accused-racist-views

Bob Carr reveals former British PM warned him of challenge posed by immigration

Bob Carr
Australia's foreign minister, Bob Carr, said that Margaret Thatcher pleaded with him to ensure Sydney did not 'end up like Fiji'. Photograph: Achmad Ibrahim/AP

Margaret Thatcher has been accused by the Australian foreign minister of having held "unabashedly racist" views after he revealed that the late former British prime minister had warned him of the challenge posed by immigration from Asia.

Bob Carr, who served as premier of New South Wales between 1995 and 2005, said that Thatcher pleaded with him to ensure Sydney did not "end up like Fiji" where citizens of Indian heritage formed a majority until a coup in 1987.

Carr, whose wife is of Malaysian origin, spoke of his surprise at Thatcher's remarks. The senator told the Lateline programme on ABC TV: "I recall one conversation I had with her in her retirement where she said something that was unabashedly racist, where she warned Australia – talking to me with Helena [his wife] standing not far away – against Asian immigration, saying that if we allowed too much of it we'd see the natives of the land, the European settlers, overtaken by migrants."

Carr expressed astonishment when Thatcher drew an analogy with Fiji, where the Indo-Fijian community formed a majority of the population in 1970 when it achieved independence from Britain. The community, descendants of labourers who travelled to the former British colony to work on sugar plantations in the late 19th century, has fallen to just over 38% in the last two decades after a 1987 coup. In 2000 Mahendra Chaudhry, the first Indo-Fijian prime minister, was taken hostage in another coup.

Carr said: "I was astonished. Helena fortunately was out of earshot. I remember one thing she [Thatcher] said as part of that conversation. She said: 'You will end up like Fiji. I like Sydney but you can't allow the [Asian] migrants … to take over otherwise you will end up like Fiji where the Indian migrants have taken over."

The foreign minister added: "I was so astonished I don't think I could think of an appropriate reply. I think we moved on to other subjects pretty quickly."

Carr, a Labour senator who was appointed foreign minister after the resignation of the former prime minister Kevin Rudd last year, made clear that he still respected Thatcher on the grounds that she challenged the centre-left to modernise.

He said: "She produced a realignment of politics. She forced my side of politics, the social democrat parties, to think more deeply about the role and function of the state, of the public sector. [She] forced Labour parties around the world to consider whether government could remotely pretend to be the answer to many of the problems it was assumed it could be. I also think she was right in joining Reagan and denouncing the old Soviet Union as an evil dictatorship."

Carr's remarks contrasted with warm praise for Thatcher from Julia Gillard, Australia's British-born and first woman prime minister. Speaking in Beijing, she said: "Her service as the first female prime minister of the United Kingdom was a history-making achievement. Her strength of conviction was recognised by her closest supporters and her strongest opponents."

Margaret Thatcher's death

Funeral to involve 700 armed forces personnel

Coffin bearers will be from units associated with Falklands war, Downing Street announces

Live

Politicians' tributes to Thatcher – live updates

Campaign for Thatcher statue in Trafalgar Square gathers momentum

Thatcher tribute to be boycotted by ex-Labour minister

Size of estate still a family secret

Critics plan celebrations before funeral

Comment

Russell Brand: I always felt sorry for her children

The actor and comedian recalls a bizarre recent encounter with the Iron Lady, and how it prompted him to think about growing up under the most unlikely matriarch-figure imaginable

Jonathan Freedland: a debate over Britain's present and future

Alastair Campbell: MPs must debate legacy, not merely pay tribute

Philip Hensher: what would Britain be like without Thatcher?

Charles Kennedy: Scotland was mission impossible

Analysis

How Falklands gamble paid off

The prime minister's decision to go to war in 1982, with her government on the brink of collapse, changed everything

How did Margaret Thatcher's policies affect you?

How Thatcher changed Britain – in charts

Multimedia

International newspaper front pages – in pictures

A roundup of how the world's press marked the passing of Britain's former prime minister

VideoQueen to attend Margaret Thatcher's funeral

InteractiveThe Thatcher I knew: 20 personal takes

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http://www.economist.com/blogs/blighty/2013/04/margaret-thatcher

Margaret Thatcher

The lady who changed the world

Apr 8th 2013, 12:35 by Economist.com

ONLY a handful of peace-time politicians can claim to have changed the world. Margaret Thatcher, who died this morning, was one. She transformed not just her own Conservative Party, but the whole of British politics. Her enthusiasm for privatisation launched a global revolution and her willingness to stand up to tyranny helped to bring an end to the Soviet Union. Winston Churchill won a war, but he never created an “ism”.

The essence of Thatcherism was to oppose the status quo and bet on freedom—odd, since as a prim control freak, she was in some ways the embodiment of conservatism. She thought nations could become great only if individuals were set free. Her struggles had a theme: the right of individuals to run their own lives, as free as possible from the micromanagement of the state.

In Britain her battles with the left—especially the miners—gave her a reputation as a blue-rinse Boadicea. But she was just as willing to clobber her own side, sidelining old-fashioned Tory “wets” and unleashing her creed on conservative strongholds, notably the “big bang” in the City of London. Many of her pithiest putdowns were directed towards her own side: “U turn if you want to”, she told the Conservatives as unemployment passed 2m, “The lady’s not for turning.”

Paradoxes abound. Mrs Thatcher was a true Blue Tory who marginalised the Tory Party for a generation. The Tories ceased to be a national party, retreating to the south and the suburbs and all but dying off in Scotland, Wales and the northern cities. Tony Blair profited more from the Thatcher revolution than John Major, her successor: with the trade unions emasculated and the left discredited, he was able to remodel his party and sell it triumphantly to Middle England. His huge majority in 1997 ushered in 13 years of New Labour rule.

Yet her achievements cannot be gainsaid. She reversed what her mentor, Keith Joseph, liked to call “the ratchet effect”, whereby the state was rewarded for its failures with yet more power. With the brief exception of the emergency measures taken in the wake of the financial crisis of 2007-08, there have been no moves to renationalise industries or to resume a policy of picking winners. Thanks to her, the centre of gravity of British politics moved dramatically to the right. The New Labourites of the 1990s concluded that they could rescue the Labour Party from ruin only by adopting the central tenets of Thatcherism. “The presumption should be that economic activity is best left to the private sector,” declared Mr Blair. Neither he nor his successors would dream of reverting to the days of nationalisation and unfettered union power.

On the world stage, too, Mrs Thatcher continues to cast a long shadow. Her combination of ideological certainty and global prominence ensured that Britain played a role in the collapse of the Soviet Union that was disproportionate to its weight in the world. Mrs Thatcher was the first British politician since Winston Churchill to be taken seriously by the leaders of all the major powers. She was a heroine to opposition politicians in eastern Europe. Her willingness to stand shoulder to shoulder with “dear Ronnie” to block Soviet expansionism helped to promote new thinking in the Kremlin. But her insistence that Mikhail Gorbachev was a man with whom the West could do business also helped to end the cold war.

The post-communist countries embraced her revolution heartily: by 1996 Russia had privatised some 18,000 industrial enterprises. India dismantled the licence Raj—a legacy of British Fabianism—and unleashed a cavalcade of successful companies. Across Latin America governments embraced market liberalisation. Whether they managed well or badly, all of them looked to the British example.

But today, the pendulum is swinging dangerously away from the principles Mrs Thatcher espoused. In most of the rich world, the state’s share of the economy has grown sharply in recent years. Regulations—excessive, as well as necessary—are tying up the private sector. Businessmen are under scrutiny as they have not been for 30 years. Demonstrators protest against the very existence of the banking industry. And with the rise of China, state control, not economic liberalism, is being hailed as a model for emerging countries.

For a world in desperate need of growth, this is the wrong direction to head in. Europe will never thrive until it frees up its markets. America will throttle its recovery unless it avoids over-regulation. China will not sustain its success unless it starts to liberalise. This is a crucial time to hang on to Margaret Thatcher’s central perception—that for countries to flourish, people need to push back against the advance of the state. What the world needs now is more Thatcherism, not less.

Margaret Thatcher

A cut above the rest


Ind. man with 47 guns arrested after school threat


Associated Press

CEDAR LAKE, Ind. (AP) — A northern Indiana man who allegedly threatened to "kill as many people as he could" at an elementary school near his home was arrested by officers who later found 47 guns and ammunition hidden throughout his home.

Von. I. Meyer, 60, of Cedar Lake, was arrested Saturday after prosecutors filed formal charges of felony intimidation, domestic battery and resisting law enforcement against him. He was being held Sunday without bond at the Lake County Jail, pending an initial hearing on the charges, police said in a statement.

Cedar Lake Police officers were called to Meyer's home early Friday after he allegedly threatened to set his wife on fire once she fell asleep, the statement said.

Meyer also threatened to enter nearby Jane Ball Elementary School "and kill as many people as he could before police could stop him," the statement said. Meyer's home is less than 1,000 feet from the school and linked to it by trails and paths through a wooded area, police said.

Police said in the statement that they notified school officials and boosted security at all area schools Friday — the same day 26 people, including 20 students, were shot and killed at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

On Saturday, officers served warrants at Meyer's home and arrested him. The statement said police had learned that Meyer kept many weapons in his older, two-story home and "is a known member of the Invaders Motorcycle Gang."

Officers searched the home, finding 47 guns and ammunition worth more than $100,000 hidden throughout the home. Many of the weapons were collector's guns.

Cedar Lake is about 45 miles southeast of Chicago.

A dispatcher with Cedar Lake Police said that the police chief was not available for interviews until Monday.

Lake County police spokeswoman Patti Van Til said Sunday that a SWAT team from the department assisted in serving Saturday's warrants.



Jacintha Saldanha's Death: Australian DJs Behind Royal Prank May Face Police Probe

The two Australian DJs who pulled the prank call on the U.K. hospital where Kate Middleton was staying are now in hiding and may soon have to face police after the death of a nurse caught in the hoax.


Kate Middleton and Indian-born mother-of-two Jacintha Saldanha, 46, is thought to have taken her own life. 

 
2Day FM hosts, Michael Christian and Mel Greig.


Questions have been raised by members of the Australian public whether MI5, MI6 and/or their well known murder partners Mossad where involved somehow in the death of  Indian-born mother-of-two Jacintha Saldanha, 46, who the UK media are claiming that she took her own life...
and it is noted that all media reports coming from the United Kingdom only ever call it a suspected suicide... but was it a murder by  MI5, MI6 and/or their well known murder partners Mossad 
to make and example of the nurse who gave out the private information about
 Kate Middleton  who was in a U.K. hospital...



Australian readers of  INLNews.com and awn.bz who have read all about the murder of Thomas Allwood,
 

INL News Under-Cover Investigative Journalist  and co producer with Stephen Carew-Reid and
  the INL News Group of Fringe Shows Have Talent TV Shows Have, on the 21st June, 2012 in  Broxburn Scotland which is about an hour's drive from Edinburgh... and how the Scottish Lothian Borders Police and the Scottish Prosecution known in Scotland  as the Procurator Fiscal's Office  and the world's media are clearly not looking closely enough the evidence brought out at the recent trial of Kyle Montgomery heard from the 19th November to the 26th November 2012 in Scotland's High Court in Livingston, who had been charged by the Scottish Lothian Borders Police for the murder of Thomas Allwood ..the evidence clearly indicates strongly that Thomas Allwood was not murdered by Kyle Montgomery who locals in Broxburn say is a well known local mentally depressed Scitzophrenic  at around 2.20am on the 21st July, 2012 ... as implied by his father John Montgomery in his  sworn evidence at by Kyle Montgomery's  trial... when the much more believable independent evidence from two next door neighbours who have a common wall with John Montgomery's house in Galloway Cresent, Broxburn was produced at the trial that say they both heard and felt an enormous bang on their bedroom wall that felt like their bedroom wall was about to cave in...coming from John Montgomery's house at about 3.15 am on the 21st June, 2012.... which was the loudest bang that they had ever heard coming from John Montgomery's house which they stated was like living next door to a pub with drinking, shouting, arguing and fighting went on all the time all hours of the day and night... they said in evidence that before the enormous bang there was loud shouting, screaming, arguing and fighting coming from John Montgomery's house... however as soon as the enormous bang happened that felt like their bedroom wall was about to cave in... there was complete silence coming from John Montgomery's house... and then they heard the back door quietly open and close ... which was first time that that door was ever opened and close without being slammed for the last couple of years since they lived next door to John Montgomery's house..... John Montgomery had given sworn evidence at his sons trial that after his son grabbed a bread knife from his kitchen draw and ran out the back door after Thomas Allwood, who was unarmed when he left the house a few minutes before, and that his son Kyle Montgomery came back into the house a few minutes later with blood on the bread knife admitting to his Dad, John Montgomery, that he had just done something bad... John Montgomery then said he took to bread knife with blood on it from his Son, Kyle Montgomery and calmly placed it back into the draw still with the blook on it... then Kyle Montgomery left the house and John Montgomery calmly had another drink and then fell asleep on the lounge and did not wake up until the police turned up and arrested him at about 5 am on the 21st June, 2012... another person who was at John Montgomery's house that early morning on the 21st June, 2012 was a lady known as Maggie whose name is Margaret Shedden (Galloway being her birth name- a very well connected and influential family in Scotland with a famous politician George Galloway and a Freemason Scottish Police Officer Hugh Galloway  of 7 Tower Place Johnstone Renfrewshire Renfrewshire 791 being member of the family)...John Montgomery's family also are well connnected and respected in Scotland with war heros in the family and a Freemason Police Officer Alexander Montgomery  51 Parkhead Rd Glen Village by Falkirk Stirlingshire 484

also a member of the Montgomery Family.... so it does not seem believable that John Montgomery would not have been awake and/or woken up with the enormous bang coming from his house at about 3.15 that the next door neighbours say was the loudest bang they had ever heard from John Montgomery's house and felt like their bedroom wall was going to cave in... so this clearly indicates along with other evidence that John Montgomery had lied on the witness stand and in doing so has implicated his Kyle Montgomery as the person who was likely to have made a fatal six inch stab wound in the right chest of Thomas Allwood through cloths with a bread knife that would have cerated edge and no sharp point for stabbing anyone through clothing which is only suitable for a sawing acting rather that a stabbing action...however at the same time implicating Kyle Montgomery as the likely person who made the fatal six inch stab wound in Thomas Allwood's right chest that cut through a main archery causing the death of Thomas Allwood... John Montgomery gave evidence which is believed by the jury could get his son off the murder charge his Son Kyle Montgomery was facing and to try and convince the jury that his son

 Kyle Montgomery was only guilty of culperable homicide... which is like an accident homicide crime that resulted in the death of a person without intent in a drunken fight that got out of hand ... even though the bar maid gave evidence at the trial that Thomas Allwood was only drinking soft drinks that night... and Kyle Montgomery had been alcohol drinking heavily since about 1pm on the 20th June, 2012.....and so was his father John Montgomery drinking alcohol heavily since at least 8pm and likely most of the day since he received his government benefit cheque  that day... in fact the jury based mainly on his father's evidence... very conveniently  for all those Scottish Government officials  involved in the investigation into the murder of Thomas Allwood.... and others...  found Kyle Montgomery not guilty of the murder of Thomas Allwood and found Kyle Montgomery guilty of the lesser charge of Culperable homicide (accidental death) of Thomas Allwood....now the evidence that came out at the trial of Kyle Montgomery seems to clearly indicate that there were at least four people... maybe more in the house of Kyle Montgomery from 10pm on the 2oth June, 2012 and about 3.30 am on the 21st June, 2012... and in fact at least voices coming from John Montgomery's house that night and early morning were heard by the next door neighbours ....these seem to include...Thomas Allwood, John Montgomery, Kyle Montgomery and Margaret Shedden (Galloway being her birth name) and maybe others who did not want to make themselves known and kept reasonable quiet while at John Montgomery's house... the evidence seems to clearly indicate that at 2am to 2.30 am on the 21st June, 2012 when John Montgomery states was the time frame when his son Kyle Montgomery was meant to have gone out the back door and meant to have stabbed Thomas Allwood with a bread knife and came back with blood on the knife admitting he has just done something bad...making it fairly obvious to the at least three people left at the house which at the least included John Montgomery, Kyle Montgomery and Margaret Shedden (Galloway being her birth name)... that Kyle Montgomery had just stabbed Tomas Allwood outside in the back yard and/or a nearby street .. and that Thomas Allwood would be likely have been badly hurt from a stab wound and would have needed urgent medical attention.... regardless if  was considered that stabbing of Thomas Allwood by Kyle Montgomery deliberate and/or in self defense... either way it would have been clear to these three people and anyone else that may have been at John Montgomery's house at that time, that they should call an ambulance and the police immediately to make sure that Thomas Allwood obtained urgent medical attention which if had been done then could well have saved the life of Thomas Allwood... sure the fact that neither of these people bothered to ring the police and/or an ambulance to try and get urgent help for Thomas Allwood at around 2.20-2.30 am...if what John Montgomery says id true.... they all should be charged with being responsible for the murder and/or death of Thomas Allwood as they seemed to just let him die on the street or the back yard.. and under Australian law could well be charged as accessories after the fact and at least charged with some serious charge that resulted in the death of Thomas Allwood... very similar to walking away from a serious car accident where it is clear someone had been seriously hurt and not calling the police and/or an ambulance....

Now... when one looks at the evidence of the two next door neighbours that say they both heard and felt an enormous bang on their bedroom wall that felt like their bedroom wall was about to cave in...coming from John Montgomery's house at about 3.15 am on the 21st June, 2012.... which was the loudest bang that they had ever heard coming from John Montgomery's house... then the more believable  truth is that at about 3.15 am Thomas Allwood was king hit by someone and/or some people with either a fist or fists and/or a hard object that was enough to knock out Thomas Allwood.. then the body of Thomas Allwood was carried outside while Thomas Allwood was still unconscious ...then someone stabbed Thomas Allwood... not with a bread knife but a sharp pen knife which made the deep six inch stab wound into the right chest of Thomas Allwood that cut a main archery so that Thomas Allwood was never wake up and would bleed to death... and then quietly they carried Thomas Allwood body to the next streets Clarkson and Pyothall Roads and quietly left the body  there at about 3.30 am where the body was found at about 4.45 am by three boys walking past at that time...the neighbour that had a window open looking right over where Thomas Allwood's body was found says you can hear a pin drop in her street and there was not one sound or noise in her street that early morning... and the only noise that was heard was the sound of the police at about 5am looking at the body and the murder scene... so it is clear that there was not fighting in her street that morning at 2.00-4.00 am where the body was found that morning and so screaming or cries for help from Thomas Allwood in her street that morning at 2.00-4.00 am where the body was found that morning.. why?... because Thomas Allwood was obviously carried and left there and was already unconscious having been knocked out before he was stabbed with the six inch stab wound and then stabbed and then carried to to the next streets Clarkson and Pyothall Roads and quietly left there... private investigators employed by friends and family of Thomas Allwood have a strong belief that the evidence clearly suggests that Thomas Allwood was not murdered and/or even killed by Kyle Montgomery with a bread knife but was murdered by a contract killer well trained to know where and how to stab a person with one six inch stab wound with a very sharp and pointed pen knife which is designed to be able to kill some with just one stab wound.... the people in the world that are well known to be able to know how to murder someone with just one stab wound are agents and/or assets of MI5, MI6 and Mossad... and it is well known they work as agents for the state of the United Kingdom and the UK Prime Minister's Office to carry out murders of people like Thomas Allwood who was an undercover INL News Investigative Journalist who was working on a story to expose state of the United Kingdom and the UK Prime Minister, David Cameron and their Treasury Solicitors and Barristers for knowing being involved with having a false and fraudulent UK Border Agency document and having that false and fraudulent document presented to the High Court of Justice to stop Thomas Allwood from successfully claiming £500 million in damages claim for the wrongful arrest of USA Comedian Ronnie Prouty by the UK Border Agency on the 27th April, 2011 as a favour for the powerful Rupert and James Murdoch and their all powerful media group News Corporation as a way of commercially sabotaging the planned filming of the pilot fo the Fringe Shows Have Talent TV Show in Edinburgh in April- May 2011 being co-produced by Thomas Allwood, Stephen Carew-Reid (the author of the well known bboks The Triumph of Truth -Who Is Watching the Watchers? and the original founder of the INL News Group-formerly known as the Australian Weekend News Publishing Group) and the INL News Group to create an international showcase of talented entertainers that perform at the 60 year old Edinburgh Fringe Festival each year... which has become the biggest arts festival in the world with over 3,000 Fringe shows being performed during August each year in Edinburgh....

Below is some the transcripts of what was said at a court hearing in London's High Court of Justice heard on the 24th July, 2012 where applications were originally listed to be heard by Thomas Allwood prior to his murder on the 21st June, 2012 in Broxburn, Scotland for criminal contempt applications to be heard against  David Cameron the UK Prime Minister, George Osborne, the UK Chancellor, the UK Government, the UK Border Agency and their treasury solicitors  for knowingly having prepared a false and fraudulent UK Border Agency document and presenting such false and fraudulent UK Border Agency document to the High Court of Justice to try to stop Thomas Allwood from suing David Cameron the UK Prime Minister, George Osborne, the UK Chancellor, the UK Government, the UK Border Agency for £500 million in damages caused to the filming of the Fringe Shows Have Talent TV Show by the wrongful arrest of USA Comedian Ronnie Prouty on the 27th April, 2012 at Heathrow Airport as favour David Cameron and George Osborne's good friends at the time...Rupert and James Murdoch and their all powerful multi- billion media group known as News Corporation..the murder of Thomas Allwood on the 21st June, 2012 meant that would stop Thomas Allwood continuing with his criminl contempt applications against suing David Cameron the UK Prime Minister, George Osborne, the UK Chancellor, the UK Government, the UK Border Agency and their treasury solicitors and well as other criminal contempt applications taken out against barristers and solicitors involving another legal fight Thomas Allwood and his de-facto partner Valerie Butler where involved with at the High Court of Justice in their fight over their 25 acre family farm known as Haywicks Farm, Haywicks Lane, Hardwicke, Gloucester in the UK... where Thomas Allwood alleged that powerful and well connected s Freemason solicitors and barrister in Gloucester that Thomas Allwood called the Gloucestershire Legal Mafia (GLM) were involved with the preparing a false will in the name of Valerie Butler's father Herbert Butler and presenting that false will for a wrongful grant of probate so that partners of the Gloucestershire Legal Mafia (GLM) could wrongly obtain the title deed of their 25 acre family farm known as Haywicks Farm, Haywicks Lane, Hardwicke, Gloucester in the UK which they had planned to turn into a multi-million luxury real estate development ... Thomas Allwood also had a firm belief and was not scared to openly say...that Valerie Butler's father Herbert Butler was also murdered as part of the conspiracy he alleged to defraud his de-facto partner Valerie Butler of her rightful ownership of Haywicks Farm..

Some of the reasons why the Private Investigation Team employed by friends and family of the late Thomas Allwood to investigate who and why Thomas Allwood was murdered on the 21st June. 2012 in Broxburn, Scotland strongly believe that the powerful agents of the State of the United Kingdom such as MI5, MI6 and/or Mossad and/or some other professional contract murdered was and/or were involved in the murder of Thomas Allwood on the 21st June, 2012 include:

1. The Scottish Lothian Borders Police and the Scottish Prosecution known in Scotland  as the Procurator Fiscal's Office  and the world's media are clearly not looking closely enough the evidence brought out at the recent trial of Kyle Montgomery heard from the 19th November to the 26th November 2012 in Scotland's High Court in Livingston, who had been charged by the Scottish Lothian Borders Police for the murder of Thomas Allwood ... seem to be risking their worldwide good  reputation by quite openly protecting those at the house of John Montgomery on the evening of the 20th June, 2012 and the early morning of the 21st June, 2012 who according to the evidence of John Montgomery, and including John Montgomery knew that Thomas Allwood was likely badly wounded from a stab wound at about 2.20 am and did niot ring the police of an ambulance and simply went to sleep and left Thomas Allwood to die on the road just a street away from John Montgomery's house

2.  Why is there a complete worldwide media block out.. except for one lone Scottish Journalist Vic Roderick who was the only journalist to cover the trial... who has now been silenced by the world mainstream  media with what is called a "D Notice" on the reporting of the murder/death of Thomas Allwood who was an undercover INL News Investigative Journalist, Poet and TV Shows producer of the Fringe Shows have Talent TV Show...

3. Why is the a mentally sick person such as Kyle Montgomery whom the locals say is a well known Scitzophrenic which is capable to believing and/or repeating any story he is told is the truth.. being made a patsy for the death of Thomas Allwood.. .at about 2.20 am when  the evidence clearly indicates that Thomas Allwood was knocked unconscious in the house of John Montghomery at about 3.15 am on the 21st June, 2012 and then carried out of the house and then stabbed with a six inch wound in the right chest cutting a main archery nd then carried to be let to die on Clarkson and Pyothall Road, Broxburn

With the more believable  truth is that at about 3.15 am Thomas Allwood was king hit by someone and/or some people with either a fist or fists and/or a hard object that was enough to knock out Thomas Allwood.. then the body of Thomas Allwood was carried outside while Thomas Allwood was still unconscious ...then someone stabbed Thomas Allwood... not with a bread knife but a sharp pen knife which made the deep six inch stab wound into the right chest of Thomas Allwood that cut a main archery so that Thomas Allwood was never wake up and would bleed to death... and then quietly they carried Thomas Allwood body to the next streets Clarkson and Pyothall Roads and quietly left the body  there at about 3.30 am where the body was found at about 4.45 am by three boys walking past at that time...the neighbour that had a window open looking right over where Thomas Allwood's body was found says you can hear a pin drop in her street and there was not one sound or noise in her street that early morning... and the only noise that was heard was the sound of the police at about 5am looking at the body and the murder scene...

so it is clear that there was not fighting in her street that morning at 2.00-4.00 am where the body was found that morning and so screaming or cries for help from Thomas Allwood in her street that morning at 2.00-4.00 am where the body was found that morning.. why?... because Thomas Allwood was obviously carried and left there and was already unconscious having been knocked out before he was stabbed with the six inch stab wound and then stabbed and then carried to to the next streets Clarkson and Pyothall Roads and quietly left there... private investigators employed by friends and family of Thomas Allwood have a strong belief that the evidence clearly suggests that Thomas Allwood was not murdered and/or even killed by Kyle Montgomery with a bread knife but was murdered by a contract killer well trained to know where and how to stab a person with one six inch stab wound with a very sharp and pointed pen knife which is designed to be able to kill some with just one stab wound.... the people in the world that are well known to be able to know how to murder someone with just one stab wound are agents and/or assets of MI5, MI6 and Mossad...

Part of the transcripts of hearing before Justice Vos at High Court of Justice in London on the 24th July, 2012

Miss Love: The Border Agency matter.

Mr Justice Vos: I know, but I do not have any of the core papers in the Border Agency matter. What is the action no?

Miss Love: My Lord, it is HC11C04395

Mr Justice Vos: You see that is why, I have been through all the cases, and I do not have any papers in that except your letter and the correspondence.

Miss Love: Right

Mr Justice Vos: If I just pick it up. I have this much stuff on the UKBA, but it really is just your letter and a lot of historical material, and material concerning the famous INL News Group.

Miss Love: Mr Lord, we can remedy that situation _ I am sure your Lordship does not particularily want further copies of the correspondence, but certainly of the original claim form_

Mr Justice Vos: That is what I would like. So there was an application, was there, in that matter that was returnable today?

Miss Love: There was....

Mr Justice Vos: To do what?

Miss Love: If I could just start the procedural history, the claim by Mr Carew-Reid, which in essense was apparently a claim for damages in respect of treatment by the UK Border Agency of an individual known as Mr Prouty was issued on 9th December, 2011...

Page 6:

Miss Love: as you will see, it appears to be some hybrid of striking out and appealing the order of Master Bowles, an application for the cross-examination of myself and Mr Spanton, who was acting Treasury Solicitor and a generalised, if I might respectfully say so, rather difficult to grasp criminal contempt application..

Mr Justice Vos: It is another criminal contempt

Page 8:

Mr Geis: But the point was that Mr Prouty was refused entry into the UK and I've seen the forms that Mr Carew-Reid had, and there was one form which did not have a signature on. Now, I think this does cause for a bit of alarm and I think you should carefully consider this point and. if necessary, make an adjournment.

Mr Justice Vos: Thank you, Mr Gies...

Miss Lean: My Lord may have seen in the more recent correspondence from Mr Reid and INL that clearly they have concerns that this was a murder effected by MI5 or Mossad and/or other agents of the State, but as  far as we are aware it is being dealt with as a criminal murder charge (murder of Thomas Allwood)

Mr Justice Voss: Yes, and who was Mr Allwood- apart from being a party to litigation, did he occupy some important position?....

Miss Lean: My Lord, for completeness, I should mention I am afraid among the many letters and emails from members of the INL News Group I do not have that one. I think I have seen some reference in the correspondence to Mr Allwood being involved with the INL News Group in some capacity so that may be the...

Mr Justice Voss: Right, but he was a associate and friend of Mr Carew-Reid, that is what it comes to?.... Right, thank you. Well Mr Carew-Reid himself says he was a friend of Mr Carew-Reid's side, I do not think we need to go further than that.....

Jacintha Saldanha's Death: Australian DJs Behind Royal Prank May Face Police Probe

The two Australian DJs who pulled the prank call on the U.K. hospital where Kate Middleton was staying are now in hiding and may soon have to face police after the death of a nurse caught in the hoax.

This morning, there are also new questions about whether DJs Mel Greig and Michael Christian, radio shock jocks at Sydney's 2Day FM broke laws after they recorded the private conversation when they pretended to be Queen Elizabeth and Prince Charles.

British police have also contacted Australian police about a possible probe into the prank call, The Associated Press reported Sunday.

Rhys Holleran, CEO of Southern Cross Austereo, the parent company of Sydney's 2Day FM radio station said no laws were broken. The prank had been cleared by the Australian radio station's lawyers. Holleran said the DJs followed the company's procedures before broadcasting the call. "I think the more important question here is that we're very confident that we haven't done anything illegal. Our main concern at this point in time is what has happened is incredibly tragic and we're deeply saddened and we're incredibly affected by that," Holleran said Saturday. The hoax has caused public outcry after the death of a nurse, Jacintha Saldanha, who connected the pair to the Duchess' room.

Saldanha was found dead Friday morning after police were called to an address near the hospital to "reports of a woman found unconscious," according to a statement from Scotland Yard. Circumstances of her death are still being investigated, but are not suspicious at this stage, authorities said earlier. Lord Glenarthur, the chairman of King Edward VII's Hospital, the U.K. hospital where the Duchess of Cambridge was receiving treatment, condemned the prank Saturday in a letter to the Max Moore-Wilton, chairman of Southern Cross Austereo, the Australian radio station's parent company.

Glenarthur said the prank humiliated "two dedicated and caring nurses," and the consequences were "tragic beyond words," The Associated Press reported. Max Moore-Wilton, the chairman of Southern Cross Austereo, said in a letter to Lord Glenarthur Sunday that the company is reviewing the station's broadcast policies, the AP reported. "I can assure you we are taking immediate action and reviewing the broadcast and processes involved," Moore-Wilton said in the letter. "As we have said in our own statements on the matter, the outcome was unforeseeable and very regrettable." Saldanha came to England from India nine years ago, with her husband and two children. On Facebook, her 14-year-old daughter wrote this weekend, simply: "I miss you, I loveeee you."

Saldanha worked as a nurse at King Edward VII private hospital for four years. Her family lives 100 miles away in Bristol, but while on shift she slept in a residence for nurses. With no receptionist on duty overnight she answered the prank call and put it through. The hospital called her a "first-class nurse" and "a well-respected and popular member of the staff" and extended "deepest sympathies" to family and friends, saying that "everyone is shocked" at this "tragic event."

The duchess spent three days at the hospital undergoing treatment for hyperemesis gravidarum, severe or debilitating nausea and vomiting. She was released from the hospital Thursday morning. The hospital apologized for the mistake.

A man who stabbed a photographer to death in a drunken street brawl was caught after police found a blood-stained knife in a cutlery drawer.

http://local.stv.tv/edinburgh/203156-killer-who-stabbed-man-to-death-had-bloody-knife-in-cutlery-drawer/


A man who stabbed a photographer to death in a drunken street brawl was caught after police found a blood-stained knife in a cutlery drawer.

Kyle Montgomery, 24, denied murdering Thomas Allwood after a late-night drinking session but was found guilty of culpable homicide by a jury on Wednesday.

Jurors at the High Court in Livingston took four and a half hours to return a guilty verdict on the lesser charge.

Sentence on the first-time offender, of Winchburgh, West Lothian, was deferred until December 20 for background reports.

Mr Allwood, a 56-year-old photographer who worked for the Australian-based INL News Group, was stabbed in the chest during an incident on June 21.

Giving evidence in his own defence, Montgomery claimed he grabbed the knife to frighten Mr Allwood after being attacked by him at a house in Broxburn, West Lothian.

He said the killing was an accident and that he did not know the blade had sliced through the victim's chest and severed a major artery as he struggled with the victim.

Police who were called to the scene followed a trail of blood from Mr Allwood's body to Montgomery's father’s home. They found the knife, still stained with blood, in a cutlery drawer.

Montgomery was detained as he returned to the house from a nearby shop.

Mr Allwood was a photographer with the Australian-based INL News Group. Although he was born in Scotland, his family emigrated when he was a child and he spent most of his live in Australia.


http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/murder-trial-told-dna-of-victim-1453803

Murder trial told DNA of victim and alleged killer found on kitchen knife

24 Nov 2012 00:01

THE knife was found in the kitchen of the dad of Kyle Montgomery, who denies murdering Thomas Allwood.

THE DNA of a murder victim and his alleged killer were found on a kitchen knife, a court heard yesterday.

The High Court in Livingston was told the odds of the DNA matching anyone other than the deceased, Thomas Allwood, were 28,600,000-1.

Blood samples lifted from the blade were a billion-to-one match for 24-year-old Kyle Montgomery, who denies murdering Thomas in Broxburn on June 21.

The knife was found in Montgomery’s dad’s kitchen.

Forensic scientist Kirsty McTurk told the jury: “The findings are consistent with Kyle Montgomery having assaulted Thomas Allwood.”

The trial was adjourned until Monday.

http://www.scotsman.com/news/scottish-news/top-stories/man-caused-stab-death-by-accident-1-2664172


Man ‘caused stab death by accident’

Published on Wednesday 28 November 2012






A MAN accused of murdering an Australian journalist has claimed he must have stabbed the victim to death by accident.

Kyle Montgomery admitted that he armed himself with a kitchen knife and squared up to 56-year-old Thomas Graham Allwood.

He claimed in evidence at the High Court in Livingston that the blade was for his own “protection” and he had no intention of using it.

After being attacked twice by the victim, he said he just wanted to “scare him off” with the knife.

He struggled with Mr Allwood, who was armed with a metal pole or iron bar, but said he was unaware of inflicting the fatal blow which severed the main artery above his heart.

Montgomery, 24, from Winchburgh, West Lothian, denies murdering Mr Allwood in Broxburn on June 21.

In his closing speech yesterday, advocate depute Martin Macari asked the jury to convict Montgomery of murder. He said: “Whatever happened between those men, Kyle Montgomery had returned to the house to get a weapon.”

Derek Ogg QC, defending, said: “If he didn’t realise he’d caused that injury, he could not and did not have any criminal intent towards Mr Allwood.”

Judge Lord Doherty was due to deliver his charge to the jury this morning.

Comment from INL News Reader: Mary Gleeson

I have read all the published stories on the trial of Kyle Montgomery who was charged with the murder of INL Journalist Thomas Allwood, and all other previous media reports I could find on the web since Thomas Allwood was first reported on the BBC website on the 22nd June 2012 that he had been murdered in Broxburn, Scotland and that Kyle Montgomery was charged with Willfull murder of Thomas Allwood... and I have come to the conclusion that the way the evidence has presented at the trial of Kyle Montgomery and what evidence has been given by the witnesses the dots simply do not add up... and the trial has created more questions than answers..... when it seems clear that this Maggie lady, described as a female friend of Thomas Allwood and tJohn Montgomery, the father of the accused ..according to John Montgomery's evidence were in the house when Kyle Montgomery deliberately went outside to chase after Thomas Allwood with a bread knife... rather than jut locking lall the doors and windows of his father's house t make sure Thomas Allwood can not get back into their house....because they were meant to be in fear of him... then ring the police and say that Thomas Allwood was threatening Kyle Montgomery and had attacked Kyle Montgomery in John Montgomery's house ( all according the John Montgomery) and was continuing to bang on their door ... then the police would have come around immediately and arrested Thomas Allwood... who would then have spent the night in the police lock up.... where he would have woken up the next morning alive and be able to explain to a magistrate and/or the police what happened that night... no it all did not happen that way... John and Kyle Montgomery both claim that having removed Thomas Allwood from John Montgomery's house.... and expecting Thomas Allwood to have been unarmed....deliberately ran out of the back door of the house to the back garden for the purpose to chase Thomas Allwood with a bread knife in his hand.... instead of staying safe in his dads house and ringing the police.... now I read in the above article the unbelievable claim by Kyle Montgomery that Thomas Allwood   "
was armed with a metal pole or iron bar" and thus was acting in self defence after delieberately going outside to look for Thomas Allwood to attack him with a knife... other purpose  would he have grabbed the knife and run outside with it for... it can only be to stab Thomas Allwood who he thought was unarmed... now Kyle Montgomery seems on the evidence had been drinking heavily since bout 1pm at his dads house and would have been very drunk by 2am the next morning and Thomas Allwood looks like a big man and Kyle Montgomery looks like a small thin boy... and thus could easily be over powered by Thomas Allwood even without Thomas Allwood have a metal pole or an iron bar to defend himself with from a vicious knife attack... we also heard from John Montgomery who said that Thomas Allwood had his son Kyle Montgomery pinned on the floor with his foot on his chest... which shows that Thomas Allwood had no problem in over powering Kyle Montgomery without any weapon of any sort.... then se have the unbelievable story of John Montgomery that at the same time the Thomas Allwood had his son Kyle Montgomery pinned to the floor by having his foot on his chest... Thomas Allwood was meant to have his hands around Kyle Montgomery's throat trying to strangle Kyle Montgomery... this is simply physically impossible for a tall big man to do at the same time as standing up with his foot on the person's chest....it is simply also unbelievable that that Thomas Allwood was armed outside with a metal pole or iron bar because if that was the case having already being told by John Montgomery that Thomas Allwood had no problem about being able to overpower Kyle Montgomery without any weapon, the how the hell is Kyle Montgomery going to be able fatally stab Thomas Allwood with just one six inch stab wound with a bread knife ( bread knife do not have pointy tips and just a cerated edge for a sawing action for bread or meat but not a stapping action) through clothing knowing the exact place to stab (single handed) a big man to kil him with one stab wound in the front chest ( not in the back)  who is well aware that of the identity of the attacked and that the attcked is likely to attack because of a previous disagreement in the house.... and Thomas Allwood is also now armed with a metal pole or an iron bar.... which in one swing would have knocked small frail drunk Kyle Montgomery for six ... there is no way Kyle Montgomery is going to have any chance of being able to make that one fatal stab wound all by himself.... no normal jury is going to beleive this story.. so there seems no doubt what ever happened that morning Thomas Allwood must have been unarmed and Kyle Montgomery would have have to hav had some helpers... if it was really Kyle Montgomery that handed the fatal stab wound on Thomas Allwood...at about 2.15 according to the timing given by his father John Montgomery... then John and Kyle Montgomery and the lasy Maggie have to explain what the enmormous bang against the wall of the next door neighbours bedroom that cam from John Montgomery's house at about 3.5 to 3.15 am that felt to them that their bedroom wall was abourt to cave in... then after there being constant arguing, shouting and fighting etc before this enormous bang at about 3.05 to 3.15 am on the 21st June 2012.. everything from John Montgomery's house suddenly went quiet and for the first tikme ever... the back door was opened and wht and the door was not slammed which indicated clearly that someone or some people went out the door of John Montgomery's very silently and quietly... and the only logical deduction as to what the enormous bang against the wall was just before that nearly push the wall in from John Montgomery's side... was someone king hitting Thomas Allwood with a fist or a heavy object.. making him unconscious....then carrying Thomas Allwood out the door while he was unconscious... then may be making soem more bruses on his boy and then the one fatal stab wound ... all while he was unconscious.... and then carrying the body of Thomas Allwood quietly to where he was found on Clarkson/Pyothall Roads... at about 4.45 am by passers by... 
However if one is to discount that theory and ignore the enormosu bang at 3.05 to 3.15 am coming from John Montgomery's house... and just still to what John Montgomery sated on the witness stand under oath.. that his sone Kyle Montgomery grabbed a bread knife from the kitchen draw and ran out the back door( obviously to go to try and stab Thomas Allwood or at least chase after himw ith the knife) then coming back ten minutes later with blod on the knife and admitting he had done something bad... and John Montgomery not asking any more questions and calmly oputting the knife woth the blood on it back into the draw... having one more drink,,, the son leave the house and he falls asleep on the lounge...and is woken uop at about 5am by the police arresting him... so why didn't John Montgomery, Kyle Montgomery and/or Maggie ring the police and/or an ambulance at about 2.20 am which would haved saved the life of Thomas Allwood..

http://www.lbp.police.uk/information/latest_news/news_archives/2012/november_2012/man_convicted_of_thomas_allwoo.aspx

Man convicted of Thomas Allwood death

28 November 2012 15:59



A man who stabbed his victim in the chest, resulting in his death has today been convicted.

At the High Court in Livingston today, Kyle Montgomery was found guilty of culpable homicide after killing 56-year-old Thomas Graham Allwood during a disturbance in Broxburn in the early hours of Thursday 21st June.

Members of the public found Mr Allwood's body in Clarkson Road and alerted police who launched a major investigation to identify his killer.

Detectives quickly traced and arrested Montgomery and charged him in connection Mr Allwood's death.

The 24-year-old is due to be sentenced on Thursday 20th December at Edinburgh High Court.

Detective Inspector Stuart Houston, who led the investigation said: "It is my sincere hope, that following today's verdict Mr Allwood's family can begin to move on with their lives and put this horrendous ordeal behind them.

"I would also like to thank the members of the community who came forward and assisted with this investigation.

"Lothian and Borders Police are committed to tackling violent crime and by working closely with our partners at the Crown Office, ensure that offences of this nature are investigated thoroughly and those responsible are removed from our communities."


Thomas Allwood was born in Scotland but spent most of his life in Australia

First offender Kyle Montgomery will be sentenced next month for the killing



http://www.s1broxburn.com/news/broxburn-killer-montgomery-convicted--1.html


Broxburn killer Montgomery convicted

by Rebecca GarrettWednesday, 28 November 2012

The monster who stabbed Thomas Graham Allwood in the chest in Broxburn, which resulted in his death, has been convicted.

Kyle Montgomery was found guilty of culpable homicide the High Court in Livingston. He killed 56-year-old Allwood during a disturbance in the early hours of Thursday, June 21.

Members of the public found Mr Allwood's body in the Clarkson Road/Pyothall Road area and alerted police. A major investigation to identify his killer was launched.

Detectives quickly traced and arrested Montgomery and charged him in connection Mr Allwood's death

The 24-year-old is due to be sentenced on Thursday, December 20 at Edinburgh High Court.

Detective Inspector Stuart Houston, who led the investigation, said: "It is my sincere hope, that following today's verdict Mr Allwood's family can begin to move on with their lives and put this horrendous ordeal behind them.

"I would also like to thank the members of the community who came forward and assisted with this investigation.

"Lothian and Borders Police are committed to tackling violent crime and by working closely with our partners at the Crown Office, ensure that offences of this nature are investigated thoroughly and those responsible are removed from our communities."



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-20526345

28 November 2012


Kyle Montgomery found guilty of killing journalist Thomas Allwood

A man who stabbed a journalist to death in West Lothian has been convicted of culpable homicide.

Kyle Montgomery, from Winchburgh, denied murdering 56-year-old Thomas Allwood in Broxburn in June.

A jury at the High Court in Livingston took four-and-a-half hours to find the 24-year-old guilty of the lesser charge.

Sentence was deferred until 20 December at the High Court in Edinburgh for background reports.

Montgomery had said he grabbed a knife to scare off Mr Allwood after claiming he was attacked by him at a house in Broxburn.

He said the killing was an accident and that he did not know the blade had sliced through the victim's chest and severed a major artery during the struggle.

After the attack, Mr Allwood, who was a journalist with the Australian-based INL News Group, was found on Clarkson Road by members of the public.

Police who were called to the scene followed a trail of blood from his body to Montgomery's father house.

They found the knife, still bloodstained, in a cutlery drawer. Montgomery was detained as he returned to the house from a nearby shop.

Mr Allwood was born in Scotland but his family emigrated to Australia when he was a baby and he spent most of his life there.

He was involved in producing a TV show called Fringe Shows Have Talent, to showcase entertainers performing at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Det Insp Stuart Houston, who led the Lothian and Borders Police investigation, said: "It is my sincere hope, that following today's verdict Mr Allwood's family can begin to move on with their lives and put this horrendous ordeal behind them.

"I would also like to thank the members of the community who came forward and assisted with this investigation.

"Lothian and Borders Police are committed to tackling violent crime and by working closely with our partners at the Crown Office, ensure that offences of this nature are investigated thoroughly and those responsible are removed from our communities."



http://local.stv.tv/edinburgh/203156-killer-who-stabbed-man-to-death-had-bloody-knife-in-cutlery-drawer/


Killer who stabbed man to death had bloody knife in cutlery drawer

STV 28 November 2012 16:45 GMT








Associated Press/Carolyn Kaster, File - FILE - In this Nov. 16, 2012, file photo, President Barack Obama acknowledges House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio while speaking to reporters in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, as he hosted a meeting of the bipartisan, bicameral leadership of Congress to discuss the deficit and economy. Admnistration officials say President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner met Sunda, Dec. 9, 2012, at the White House to discuss the ongoing negotiations over the impeding "fiscal cliff." Spokesmen for both Obama and Boehner said the two men agreed to not release details of the conversation, but emphasized that the lines of communication remain open. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Stock market is a wild card in fiscal cliff talks

By By CHARLES BABINGTON | Associated Press 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress and the White House can significantly soften the initial impact of the "fiscal cliff" even if they fail to reach a compromise by Dec. 31. One thing they cannot control, however, is the financial markets' reaction, which possibly could be a panicky sell-off that triggers economic reversals worldwide.

The stock market's unpredictability is perhaps the biggest wild card in the political showdown over the fiscal cliff.

President Barack Obama's re-election gives him a strong negotiating hand, as Republicans are increasingly acknowledging. And some Democrats are willing to let the Dec. 31 deadline pass, because a rash of broad-based tax hikes would pressure Republicans to give more ground in renewed deficit-reduction negotiations.

A chief fear for Obama's supporters, however, is that Wall Street would be so disgusted or dismayed that stocks would plummet before lawmakers could prove their newfound willingness to mitigate the fiscal cliff's harshest measures, including deep, across-the-board spending cuts that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says could significantly damage the nation's military posture. SomeRepublicans believe that fear will temper the president's insistence on a hard bargain this month. Obama and GOP House Speaker John Boehner on Sunday held their first meeting between just the two of them since the election, and spokesmen for both emphasized afterward their lines of communication remain open.

The so-called cliff's recipe of major tax hikes and spending cuts can actually be a gentle slope, because the policy changes would be phased in over time. Washington insiders say Congress and the White House would move quickly in January or February to undo many, but not all, of the tax hikes and spending cuts.

Financial markets, however, respond to emotion as well as to research, reason and promises. If New Year's headlines scream "Negotiations Collapse," an emotional sell-off could threaten the president's hopes for continued economic recovery in his second term, even if Republicans receive most of the blame for the impasse.

"Nobody can predict the markets' reaction," said Rep. Jim Cooper, D-Tenn.

Some Republicans are surprised that the White House has not made clearer efforts to reassure Wall Street that if the Dec. 31 deadline is breached, the worrisome pile of tax increases and spending cuts would not hit all at once.

A few liberal commentators are making just that case.

"If we go past the so-called fiscal cliff deadlines and all the resulting budget cuts and tax increases come into force, the administration can minimize the damage," Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne wrote last week. "Obama can publicly announce he is delaying any cuts, on the theory thatCongress will eventually vitiate some of them. And he can make sure the bond markets know of his plans well in advance. ... Everyone (especially Wall Street) should calm down."

Some financial bloggers agree. "Although it would be bad to let the spending cuts and tax hikes fully go into effect, if this thing is addressed in early January, things will be okay," wrote Business Insider's Joe Weisenthal.

So far, the stock markets have stayed calm. The S&P 500 index is up 12 percent for the year.

That might be because investors agree that a temporary trip over the cliff wouldn't be too harmful. Chastened lawmakers, the thinking goes, would quickly minimize the economic damage with a deficit-reduction compromise that eluded them in December.

Or, it's possible that investors view the most pessimistic tones surrounding the fiscal cliff talks as posturing that will give way to a last-minute deal. If that is the thinking — and if the Dec. 31 deadline instead is breached — Obama's fear might come to pass: The expectation of a deal might produce a significant decline in stock prices if it doesn't occur.

As bad as that sounds, some liberals think it will be necessary to force many Republicans to drop their opposition to higher tax rates on the wealthy that Obama says are crucial to trimming the deficit.

Rep. Peter Welch, a Vermont Democrat who says temporarily going over the cliff wouldn't be so bad, noted what happened on Sept. 29, 2008. The House surprised investors by rejecting a proposed bailout of the crisis-stricken financial sector. Republicans strongly opposed the plan despite then-President George W. Bush's support. The Dow plunged 777 points, its largest one-day point drop ever. Four days later the House, shaken by the market reaction, passed a slightly modified bailout bill. 

Welch said a similar market meltdown next month, in the event of a fiscal cliff impasse, "is what will force members of Congress eventually to act." Few lawmakers in either party are eager to predict how the stocks and bonds markets would react to a failure to reach a fiscal cliff accord by year's end. "Let's not pretend the markets fully understand the politicians, or the politicians fully understand the markets," said Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., who has served in Congress for 37 years.

Follow Charles Babington on Twitter: http://twitter.com/cbabington



How the 'Mayan Apocalypse' came from a New Age magic mushroom trip

The 'prophecy' does not stem from the Mayans at all. Instead, the beliefs come from two New Age books in the Seventies and Eighties, says a British academic.

Jose Arguelles, author of The Mayan Factor (Image: Wikimedia)

The so-called 'Mayan' prophecy actually comes from New Age writers in the Seventies and Eighties (Image: Rex)

People who are expecting the world to end on December 21 - the so-called 'Mayan Apocalypse' - should be in for a pleasant disappointment.

The 'prophecy' does not stem from the Mayans at all - or date from thousands of years ago.

Instead, the beliefs come from two New Age books in the Seventies and Eighties. 

The two books predict outcomes as surreal as a 'upgrade' to human consciousness predicted by a spirit from the seventh century. The date itself comes from a prophecy based on a magic mushroom trip.

“December 21st will be just another Friday morning,” said Andrew Wilson, Assistant Head of Social Studies at the University of Derby. “A hippy guru called Jose Arguelles associated the date with the Mayan calendar in a book called The Mayan Factor in 1987. But it's an obsolete form of the calendar, which had not been used since the year 1100AD.”

“He claimed to be channelling various spirits, including the spirit of a Mayan king from the seventh century. He predicted a ‘shift in human consciousness’ - mass enlightenment.”

The actual date of December 21 first appeared in an earlier work - a 1975 book by Terence McKenna,  a writer known for his descriptions of “machine elves” seen while under the influence of drugs.

The date appeared in McKenna's ‘Timeline Zero’ prophecy, and was based on McKenna’s own mathematics, the Chinese I Ching and a magic mushroom trip.

McKenna later met Arguelles and the two became, Wilson says, part of a circle of New Age authors who cited each other’s work, lending the ‘prophecy’ an air of believability.

“The significance of December 21 2012 in ‘New Age’ circles emerged from the work of ‘ethnobotanist’ Terence McKenna as he travelled deep into the Amazon in the 1970s,” says Wilson. His calculations of a ‘zero time wave’ suggested the world would go through a large change on December 21.”

“Arguelles, who had a long-held interest in Native American spiritualties, was inspired by McKenna’s work. He popularised the date in connection with the ‘long count calendar’ of the Mayan people in his new-age circles.”

As the belief has evolved, it has become associated with other, wilder predictions - such as the idea that Earth will be hit by a ‘rogue planet’, Nibiru, or swallowed by a black hole.

“There is no central belief,” says Wilson, “It varies from the ideas that Earth’s magnetic poles might shift, to the idea of a ‘galactic council’ visiting Earth. There’s no one, definite idea - it mirrors the New Age beliefs from which it comes.”

“It’s become part of a lot of religious movements. For instance, ‘The Galactic Federation of Light’ believes that ‘Planet X’ will make a close pass by the earth in 2012 – causing a deep transformation of human life on Earth.

“What this and other apocalyptic dates have in common across new religious movements is that they are often predicted to occur within a believer’s lifetime - making their beliefs urgent and important,” said Wilson.

“However, most people who believe in the significance of December 21 2012 have tempered their predictions of an apocalypse to, instead, signifying some significant change in humanity. Whether that is a change in culture or a world-wide event - most believers in an apocalypse won't be preparing for an earthly end but looking forward to an imminent transformation."

“A lot of people look to this story for reassurance - about the financial climate, or even about fears of, for instance, the Large Hadron Collider.”

“What’s been popularised is the dramatic stuff - but I am definitely still doing my Christmas shopping as normal this year.”

Wilson’s paper, ‘From Mushrooms to the Stars’, will be published by Ashgate in 2013.



Georgia details nuke black market investigations

By By DESMOND BUTLER | Associated Press


 This June 24, 2012 photo shows the Hotel L Bakuria in Batumo, Georgia, Black Sea coast near the Turkish Border. In April 2012, three men gathered in secret at the hotel to talk about a deal for radioactive material for sale. The Georgian seller offered cesium, a byproduct from nuclear reactors that terrorists can use to make a dirty bomb.But one of the Turkish men made it clear he was after something much more dangerous: Uranium, the material used to make a nuclear bomb. The two Turks and the seller businessman Soslan Oniani, were convicted in  September, 2012 in a Georgian court, according to officials, and sentenced to six years in prison each. Despite years and hundreds of millions of dollars spent in the fight against illicit sale of nuclear contraband, the black market remain active in the countries around the former Soviet Union. (AP Photo by Desmond Butler)


This undated handout photo provided by the Georgia Interior Ministry shows components for four cylinders containing radioactive substances seized in Batumi, Georgia on April 10, 2012. Police, who have been tracking Georgian Businessman Soslan Oniani, for over  year, monitored him in a hotel room meeting with two Turskish citizens, trying to sell to sell the cylinders with the materials which included cesium-137 and strontium-90. The two Turks and the seller, Oniani, were convicted were convicted in  September, 2012 in a Georgian court, according to officials, and sentenced to six years in prison each.


Associated Press/Georgia Interior Ministry - This undated photo provided by the Georgia Interior Ministry shows part of a seizure of radioactive substances including iridium-192 and europium-152. Police in Kutaisi, Georgia arrested two people involved in the smuggling in February 2011. The investigation led police to track a third man, Soslan Oniani, who would be arrested in April 2012 trying to sell radioactive material to two Turkish men. Despite years of effort and hundreds of millions of dollars spent in the fight against the illicit sale of nuclear contraband, the black market remains active in the countries around the former Soviet Union. The radioactive materials, mostly left over from the Cold War, include nuclear bomb-grade uranium and plutonium, and dirty-bomb isotopes like cesium and iridium. (AP Photo/Georgia Interior Ministry) 

BATUMI, Georgia (AP) — On the gritty side of this casino resort town near the Turkish border, three men in a hotel suite gathered in secret to talk about a deal for radioactive material.

The Georgian seller offered cesium, a byproduct of nuclear reactors that terrorists can use to arm a dirty bomb with the power to kill. But one of the Turkish men, wearing a suit and casually smoking a cigarette, made clear he was after something even more dangerous: uranium, the material for a nuclear bombThe would-be buyers agreed to take a photo of the four cylinders and see if their boss in Turkey was interested. They did not know police were watching through a hidden camera. As they got up to leave, the police rushed in and arrested the men, according to Georgian officials, who were present.

The encounter, which took place in April, reflected a fear shared by U.S. and Georgian officials: Despite years of effort and hundreds of millions of dollars spent in the fight against the illicit sale of nuclear contraband, the black market remains active in the countries around the former Soviet Union. The radioactive materials, mostly left over from the Cold War, include nuclear bomb-grade uranium and plutonium, and dirty-bomb isotopes like cesium and iridium. The extent of the black market is unknown, but a steady stream of attempted sales of radioactive materials in recent years suggests smugglers have sometimes crossed borders undetected. Since the formation of a special nuclear police unit in 2005 with U.S. help and funding, 15 investigations have been launched in Georgia and dozens of people arrested. Six of the investigations were disclosed publicly for the first time to The Associated Press byGeorgian authorities. Officials with the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency declined to comment on the individual investigations, but President Barack Obama noted in a speech earlier this year that countries like Georgia and Moldova have seized highly enriched uraniumfrom smugglers. An IAEA official, who spoke anonymously because he was not authorized to comment, said the agency is concerned smuggling is still occurring in Georgia.

Four of the previously undisclosed cases, and a fifth — an arrest in neighboring Turkey announced by officials there — occurred this year. One from last year involved enough cesium-137 to make a deadly dirty bomb, officials said.

Also, Georgian officials see links between two older cases involving highly enriched uranium, which in sufficient quantity can be used to make a nuclear bomb. The AP's interviews with the two imprisoned smugglers in one case suggested that the porous borders and the poverty of the region contributed to the problem. The arrests in the casino resort of Batumi stand out for two reasons: They suggest there are real buyers — many of the other investigations involved stings with undercover police acting as buyers. And they suggest that buyers are interested in material that can be used to make a nuclear weapon. "Real buyers are rare in nuclear smuggling cases, and raise real risks," said nuclear nonproliferation specialist Matthew Bunn, who runs Harvard's Project on Managing the Atom. "They suggest someone is actively seeking to buy material for a clandestine bomb." The request for uranium raises a particularly troubling question. "There's no plausible reason for looking for black-market uranium other than for nuclear weapons— or profit, by selling to people who are looking to make nuclear weapons," Bunn said.

______________

Georgia's proximity to the large stockpiles of Cold War-era nuclear material, its position along trade routes to Asia and Europe, the roughly 225 miles (360 kilometers) of unsecured borders of its two breakaway republics, South Ossetia and Abkhazia, and the poverty of the region may explain why the nation of 4.5 million has become a transit point for nuclear material. Georgian officials say the radioactive material in the five new cases this year all transited through Abkhazia, which borders on Russia and has Russian troops stationed on its territory. Abkhazia's foreign ministry said it has no information about the Georgian allegations and would not comment, but in the past it has denied Georgian allegations.

Russia maintains that it has secured its radioactive material — including bomb-grade uranium and plutonium — and that Georgia has exaggerated the risk because of political tension with Moscow. But while the vast majority of the former Soviet Union's nuclear arsenal and radioactive material has been secured, U.S. officials say that some material in the region remains loose. "Without a doubt, we are aware and have been over the last several years that not all nuclear material is accounted for," says Simon Limage, deputy assistant secretary for non-proliferation programs at the U.S. State Department. "It is true that a portion that we are concerned about continues to be outside of regulatory control."

U.S. efforts to prevent smuggling have prioritized bomb-grade material because of the potential that a nuclear bomb could flatten a U.S. city. But security officials say an attack with a dirty bomb — explosives packed with radioactive material — would be easier for a terrorist to pull off. And terrorist groups, including al-Qaida, have sought the material to do so. A study by the National Defense University found that the economic impact from a dirty bomb attack of a sufficient scale on a city center could exceed that of the September 11, 2011, attacks on New York and Washington.

The U.S. government has been assisting about a dozen countries believed to be vulnerable to nuclear smuggling, including Georgia, to set up teams that combine intelligence with police undercover work. Limage says Georgia's team is a model for the other countries the U.S. is supporting. On Jan. 6, police arrested a man in Georgia's capital, Tbilisi, and seized 36 vials with cesium-135, a radioactive isotope that is hard to use for a weapon. The man said he had obtained the material in Abkhazia. In April, Georgian authorities arrested a group of smugglers from Abkhazia bringing in three glass containers with about 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) of yellowcake uranium, a lightly processed substance that can be enriched into bomb-grade material.

"At first we thought that this was coincidence," said Archil Pavlenishvili, chief investigator of Georgia's anti-smuggling team. "But since all of these cases were connected with Abkhazia, it suggests that the stuff was stolen recently from one particular place. But we have no idea where. " Days later, more evidence turned up when Turkish media reported the arrest of three Turkish men with a radioactive substance in the capital, Ankara. Police seized 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) of cesium-135, the same material seized in January in Tbilisi.

Georgian officials said the suspects were residents of Germany and driving a car with German plates, but that the material had come from Abkhazia. Turkish authorities said the men had entered Turkey from Georgia. Information provided by German authorities led to the arrest in June of five suspects in Georgia with 9 vials of cesium-135 that looked very similar to the vials seized in January. The Batumi investigation started after the arrest of two men in the city of Kutaisi in February 2011 year with a small quantity of two radioactive materials stolen from an abandoned Soviet helicopter factory, according to Georgian officials. The men said that a businessman, Soslan Oniani, had encouraged them to sell the material. Police interviewed Oniani and searched his house, but found insufficient evidence to arrest him, according to officials. Still, they kept monitoring him through phone taps and an informant. Georgian officials say Oniani was a braggart, who played on his relationship with his cousin, Tariel Oniani, a well- known organized crime boss convicted in Russia of kidnapping.

Early this year, Soslan Oniani started talking about a new deal. Through surveillance and phone taps, police learned of the meeting in Batumi and monitored it. While no money passed hands, the men discussed an illegal deal, which is sufficient for prosecution in Georgia. Tests by Georgian authorities later revealed that one lead cylinder held cesium-137, two strontium-90, and the fourth spent material that was hard to identify. All are useful for making a dirty bomb, although the material in the cylinders alone was not enough to cause mass casualties, according to data provided by Georgian nuclear regulatory authorities. The arrested Turks denied knowing they were negotiating for radioactive substances. They claimed to be musical instrument experts, who had come to Batumi seeking to buy violins. A skeptical interrogator asked them if they were familiar with the famed instrument maker Stradivarius.

One man said he had never heard of him. The two Turks and the seller, Oniani, were convicted in September in a Georgian court, according to officials, and sentenced to six years in prison each.

_______________

The Georgian smuggling cases suggest that the trade in radioactive materials is driven at least in part by poverty and the lingering legacy of Soviet corruption in a hardscrabble region. Georgian officials say that because of U.S. backed counter-smuggling efforts, organized crime groups seem to have concluded that the potential profit from trade in these materials doesn't justify the risk. But individuals sometimes conclude they can make a quick buck from radioactive material. For instance, in one newly disclosed case last year, authorities arrested two Georgian men with firearms, TNT and a lethal quantity of cesium-137. One was a former Soviet officer in an army logistics unit, who told police that at the end of his service in the early 90s, he had made a second career stealing from the military.

"He openly said: 'I was a logistics officer and my second duty was to steal everything possible," according to Pavlenishvili. The man kept the cesium for years before he and a relative tried to sell it last year to a Georgian undercover officer. He did not try to sell the weapons or explosives. Poverty and corruption also appear to have played into three smuggling incidents in 2003, 2006 and 2010 that involved bomb-grade highly enriched uranium.

In 2003, an Armenian man, Garik Dadaian, was arrested when he set off a radiation detector provided by an American program at a checkpoint on the Armenian-Georgian border. Days later, the man was released and returned to Armenia under murky circumstances.

Dadaian's name resurfaced in 2010 on a bank transfer slip in the pocket of the two smugglers arrested with highly enriched uranium. The men had obtained the material from Dadaian and were offering it as a sample of a larger quantity. Police say forensic analysis suggests the uranium may have come from the same batch seized in 2003. Russian investigators suspected Dadaian got the nuclear fuel from a manufacturing plant in Novosibirsk, Russia, where several disappearances of material have been documented. Pavlenishvili said Dadaian bribed prosecutors to win his release and take some of the uranium. The two smugglers in the 2010 case were Sumbat Tonoyan, a dairy farmer who went bankrupt, and Hrant Ohanian, a former physicist at a nuclear research facility in the Armenian capital of Yerevan. The AP interviewed both at a prison about 25 miles (40 kilometers) outside Tbilisi, where they are serving sentences of 13 and 14 years.

In separate interviews, each man blamed the other for the idea of smuggling uranium, and talked of financial hardship. Ohanian said his daughter needed urgent medical care that he couldn't afford, and Tonoyan said a bank had seized his house after his dairy factory collapsed. "I didn't have a job and I couldn't pay the bank," he said in Russian through an interpreter. The men also claimed they believed the material they were selling was to be used for scientific work, not nefarious purposes. Ohanian said a Georgian contact, who was also arrested, told him relations with Moscow were so bad that Georgian scientists could not get the uranium they needed from Russia on the open market. "I feel guilty because I behaved like an idiot," he said. "I should have known and I would never do something like this again."

Follow Desmond Butler at http://twitter.com/desmondbutler





  

Questions have been raised by members of the Australian public whether MI5, MI6 and/or their well known murder partners Mossad where involved somehow in the death of
  Indian-born mother-of-two Jacintha Saldanha, 46, who the UK media are claiming that she took her own life...
and it is noted that all media reports coming from the United Kingdom only ever call it a suspected suicide... but was it a murder by  MI5, MI6 and/or their well known murder partners Mossad 
to make and example of the nurse who gave out the private information about
 Kate Middleton  who was in a U.K. hospital...



Australian readers of  INLNews.com and awn.bz who have read all about the murder of Thomas Allwood,
 



Australian readers of  INLNews.com and awn.bz who have read all about the murder of Thomas Allwood,
INL News Under-Cover Investigative Journalist  and co producer with Stephen Carew-Reid and  the INL News Group of Fringe Shows Have Talent TV Shows Have, on the 21st June, 2012 in Broxburn Scotland which is about an hour's drive from Edinburgh... and how the evidence brought out at the recent trial of Kyle Montgomery,
who had been charged by the Scottish Lothian Borders Police for the murder of Thomas Allwood seems to clearly show that the Scottish Lothian Borders Police
and the Scottish Prosecution known as the Procurator Fiscal's Office and the UK Government are:
not interested the fact that their own prosecution witnesses agree that they did not ring the police and/or an ambulance when it was discovered that Kyle Montgomery has allegedly placed a 6 inch knife wound into the right chest of Thomas Allwood allegedly at about 2.15 am on the 21st June, 2012 ... and just let Thomas Allwood blead to death until he was found by three boys at 4.45 am two stree