WhyWasSeanHoareMurdered







Meet our News of the World Sub Editor
....Al Wijat who is being trained by his Dad Mr Wijat to take over Mr Wijat's INL News Group when his Dad retires appointed his upstart son Al Wijat as sub editor News of the World when Mr Mr Wijat's INL News Group took over control of News of the World after his arch enemy Rupert Murdoch and his son James Murdoch tried to close News of the World down...but now the original News of the World Editor has been arrested afterresigning from his new job as Press Officer for David Cameron, the Prime Minster of Britain... Al Wijat has been promoted to News of the World Editor .. Al says he is determined to make sure there are no more bribes to bent London Met Police and payments to corrupt private investigators for phone hacking of politicians, and other news worthy people..


Former News of the World reporter Sean Hoare has been found dead. Picture: AP Source: AP


THE sudden death of Sean Hoare, the former News of the World reporter who blew the whistle on phone hacking at the paper, has stunned former colleagues and those connected with the investigations into the scandal.

As the first former News of the World reporter to claim publicly that his old friend and boss Andy Coulson had "actively encouraged" him to hack into voicemail messages, Mr Hoare, who was thought to be in his forties, was likely to have been a key witness in the judicial inquiry into hacking. He would probably also have been called to appear at any criminal proceedings brought by police against senior editors and executives at News International.

Friends of the pair said that Mr Coulson, who is holidaying in Cornwall, was shocked by the latest development.

Officers were called to a first-floor flat at a modern block in Watford yesterday morning after concerns for Mr Hoare's welfare were raised by a family member. His body was found and he was pronounced dead shortly after ambulance and police arrived.

Details surrounding Mr Hoare's death were unclear last night, with the police yet to inform family members or formally to identify the body. Two officers were on duty outside the entrance last night and the curtains were drawn.

In a statement, Hertfordshire Constabulary said the "death is currently being treated as unexplained, but not thought to be suspicious".

Inspector Rod Reeves said that a family member had become concerned when Mr Hoare had not returned calls. He would not comment on where Mr Hoare's body was found in the flat, but said he was alone.

He is understood to have lived in the block with his partner, Jo.

A neighbour said: "I feared the worst a couple of months ago. He wasn't looking in great shape physically. He was not his usual, bubbly, friendly self."

Another neighbour said Mr Hoare was "paranoid" about people seeing him and spoke of a "conspiracy" and that he was afraid of the police and the Government. "He talked about all sorts of problems that he had in his life. A lot of it was alcohol-related. His passage through life has not been an easy one." The neighbour added: "He said he was in trouble and he was worried about people coming to get him."

Tributes were paid to Mr Hoare on Twitter last night with David Yelland, a former Editor of The Sun, writing: "Sean Hoare was trying to be honest, struggling with addiction. But he was a good man. My God."

Mr Hoare was sacked from the News of the World by Mr Coulson because of the effects his drink and drug problems were having on his health. Mr Hoare, who had previously worked with Mr Coulson on The Sun's Bizarre showbiz section and later at the Sunday People under Neil Wallis, was notorious on Fleet Street for his destructive lifestyle.

He told a fellow journalist of his "rock star's breakfast" - Jack Daniels and a line of cocaine. He said he took three grams of cocaine a day, which cost him about $1500 a week.

"Everyone got overconfident. We thought we could do coke, go to Brown's, sit in the Red Room with Paula Yates and Michael Hutchence. Everyone got a bit carried away," he once told The Guardian.

Former colleagues said that his dismissal had left him bitter and resentful. In an interview with the New York Times he claimed that Mr Coulson not only knew of phone hacking at the News of the World but he had "actively encouraged" it. He said he had played tape recordings of hacked messages for Mr Coulson. His allegations were heavily rejected by his former boss, who had become David Cameron's Director of Communications in May last year.

He made stronger allegations in a subsequent interview with the BBC, claiming Mr Coulson had personally asked him to hack phones and that the practice was "endemic".

In September last year he was interviewed by police about his claims but would not make a further comment, according to Keir Starmer, the Director of Public Prosecutions. He was understood to be affronted when John Yates, then the Met's Assistant Commissioner, instructed officers to interview him as a suspect, rather than as a witness.

Then, a week before his death, he made separate allegations again to the New York Times that reporters at the News of the World had paid police to use technology to locate people using their mobile phone signals, a technique called "pinging".

Although he was known to be in ill health and smoked and drank, he was still active. He recently attended a weekend children's party and had been injured taking down the marquee. He told The Guardian that he had broken his nose and injured his foot when he was struck by the pole.

One neighbour said last night: "He was physically going down hill. He was yellow in colour and wasn't looking well for the last month and was off sorts and I was really worrying about him.

"He had a constant struggle with alcohol and talked to me about how much he had put his wife through. He was talking about how he was in trouble and that he thought someone was going to come and get him, but I didn't known whether to believe half the stuff he was saying. He did say something about phone hacking and I think that was his main worry."

Phone-hacking whistleblower found dead

Sean Hoare, the reporter who alleged widespread hacking at the News of the 

http://player.video.news.com.au/theaustralian/?2060685752

James Hipwell


Fleet Street whistleblower James Hipwell, who says the News of the World was not the only newspaper to hack phones. Source:The Australian

Whistleblower ready to tell inquiry that other UK newspapers hacked phones

http://www.perthnow.com.au/james-murdoch-has-been-accused-of-misleading-british-parliament-over-the-extent-of-the-tabloid-hacking-scandal/story-fn6cmyjj-1226100045672

A FORMER reporter for the Daily Mirror says the News of the World was not the only British newspaper involved in phone hacking.

James Hipwell, 45, told The Australian Online he saw show business reporters on the Daily Mirror regularly intercept voicemail messages when he worked there from 1998 to 2000.

He says he's likely to make himself available to testify to the judicial inquiry into the scandal.

Hipwell is the only Fleet Street whistleblower who is offering to go on the record with accounts of voicemail hacking at newspapers other than the News of the World, which was closed down by Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation two weeks ago.

“I know that for one simple reason: I used to see it going on around me all the time when I worked at the Daily Mirror,” he said in an interview that will appear in The Australian tomorrow.

“I sat right next to the show business desk and there were some show biz reporters who did it as a matter of course, as a basic part of their working day.

“One of their bosses would wander up and instruct a reporter to `trawl the usual suspects', which meant going through the voice messages of celebrities and celebrity PR agents.”

“For everyone to pretend that this is some isolated activity found only at the News of the World is ridiculous, it's just a lie.”

Hipwell said that depending on legal advice he would be willing to speak to the police and to the inquiry headed by Lord Justice Brian Leveson into the hacking scandal and the future regulation of Britain's press.

Trinity Mirror, the publisher of the Daily Mirror, denied Hipwell's claims, issuing a statement declaring that: “Our journalists work within the criminal law and the Press Complaints Commission code of conduct.”

Chris Hughes, a show business reporter during Hipwell's time at the Mirror who has since become a defence correspondent, told The Australian Online that he had never hacked voicemails or been aware of the practice at the Mirror.

The first whistleblower in the scandal, Sean Hoare, worked at Trinity Mirror's Sunday People as well as News Corporation's Sun and News of the World, but he died this week from what was rumoured to be a drug overdose.

Paul McMullan, the other prominent whistleblower who has repeatedly spoken about phone hacking and other illegal practices, worked at the News of the World.

Hoare was sacked by the then NOTW editor Andy Coulson in 2005 because of his drug and drink addictions. McMullan has left the industry to run a pub and admits that he has a grudge against his former editor, Rebekah Brooks.

Hipwell also fell out with his former employer. He left the Mirror in disgrace in 2000 before being convicted five years later on market-rigging charges over “City Slickers”, a share-tipping column he wrote with a colleague.

Hipwell served 59 days in jail and was bitter to see his former editor Piers Morgan escape charges.

Morgan told investigators that it was a coincidence that he suddenly ploughed all the money he could get his hands on, Stg67,000, into shares of a relatively small firm on the day that City Slickers was about to tip it as a hot prospect, doubling its share price.

Hipwell has since written for The Guardian and The Observer. He has now moved his career to Lebanon, and writes largely about the issue of organ donation, having received a kidney transplant from his wife.

Hipwell's interview with The Australian Online is the first time he has discussed the phone hacking issue since giving an interview to The Guardian after a News of the World reporter and private investigator were first arrested five years ago.

The New York Times yesterday reported that five former journalists at the Mirror's stablemate The People had said that they regularly witnessed hacking in that newsroom in the late 1990s to early 2000, but they spoke on the condition of anonymity.

“I don't think anyone quite realised the criminality of it,” said one of the unnamed former reporters at The People.

London bombings


Fresh claims: Victims of the 2005 London bombings have said they believe police may have leaked their details to a tabloid. Picture: Paco Serinelli Source: AFP

Cops 'gave victim info to paper'

http://www.perthnow.com.au/cops-gave-victim-info-to-press/story-fn6sb9br-1226101021522

BRITISH cops are facing fresh claims they leaked details about victims of terrorism and crime to the News of the World.

The allegations deepen the scandal surrounding phone-hacking at the paper, which has shaken Rupert Murdoch's global media empire, claimed the jobs of two of Britain's top police officers and dragged in British Prime Minister David Cameron.

The Observer newspaper reported that survivors of the July 7, 2005 London bombings had asked lawyers to probe their belief that the capital's Metropolitan Police had sold or passed on a confidential contact list of victims.

Beverli Rhodes, chair of the Survivors Foundation Coalition, said journalists from the paper approached survivors with false stories about how they got their details.

"Scotland Yard had the full list of survivor contact details. I am pretty sure that is how the News of the World got my home address," she told the Observer.

Four suicide bombers blew themselves up on three underground trains and a bus in the worst terror attacks on British soil, killing 52 people.

Separately the BBC reported that police had removed an officer from the inquiry into the murder of 13-year-old Milly Dowler in 2002 after information was allegedly leaked to the News of the World (NotW).

Police in Surrey, a county southwest of London, confirmed that a detective constable was accused by a colleague of inappropriately disclosing information about the case to a "retired police officer friend".

The officer "received words of advice and was removed permanently from the inquiry", the force said in a statement. It did not mention the NotW.

The tabloid has already been accused of hacking Milly Dowler's voicemails and those of families of 7/7 victims, but this is the first time police have directly been linked to the paper's activities on the two events.

Mr Murdoch has now closed the NotW and personally apologised to Dowler's parents.

Revelations that police employed a former NotW executive who has since been arrested over hacking claimed the jobs of Scotland Yard chief Paul Stephenson and the force's anti-terror boss John Yates a week ago.

Scotland Yard was heavily criticised for botching an initial investigation, which resulted in the jailing of the paper's former royal editor and a private investigator in 2007 but concluded he was a "rogue reporter".

When the force bowed to pressure and reopened the probe in January it emerged that nearly 4000 people may have had their phones hacked.

Other British papers were dragged into the row this weekend when former journalists at the Daily Mirror and Sunday Mirror - Mr Murdoch's main British tabloid rivals - reportedly said phone-hacking was rife at their papers too.

But the main effects have been on the Mr Murdoch's US-based News Corporation, which also owns this publication.

In a further blow British Business Secretary Vince Cable said yesterday there were "big questions" over whether the mogul was fit to control a British broadcaster.

"We have learned from the past that having media moguls dominating the British media is deeply unhelpful, not simply in terms of plurality but because of the wider impact on the political world," he said.

News Corp. was forced by the scandal to scrap its bid for full control of pay-TV giant BSkyB earlier this month.

Mr Cable was stripped of responsibility for deciding the fate of the BSkyB deal last year after a newspaper secretly recorded him saying he was at "war" with Mr Murdoch.

Mr Murdoch's son James meanwhile faces calls for a police probe into evidence he gave to lawmakers last week saying he did not know hacking was more widespread.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Cameron has also come under pressure due to his decision to employ Andy Coulson, another former editor of the tabloid, as his media chief.

Mr Coulson then quit Downing Street in January and was arrested on July 8. Ten people have been detained since January.

MP to refer Murdoch claims to police

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/media/mp-to-refer-murdoch-claims-to-police/story-e6frg996-1226100152974

A SENIOR Labour British MP said last night he would refer to police accusations New International chairman James Murdoch misled a parliamentary committee.

Tom Watson said he would formally ask police to investigate Mr Murdoch's evidence this week to the House of Commons media committee after the accusations from two senior executives of the closed News of the World.

Colin Myler, the last editor of the newspaper, and Tom Crone, its top lawyer, issued a statement yesterday saying Mr Murdoch was wrong when he told MPs he had not been told in 2008 about a crucial piece of evidence in the phone hacking scandal at the newspaper.

Mr Watson, a Blair and Brown government minister and a member of the media committee, alleged that Mr Murdoch may have been involved in perverting the course of justice, and failing to report a crime.

"Myler and Crone . . . are clearly concerned that they have effectively been hung out to dry by James Murdoch in the evidence session earlier in the week," he said. "If their statement is accurate it shows James Murdoch had knowledge that others were involved in hacking as early as 2008, it shows he failed to act to discipline staff or initiate an internal investigation, which undermines Rupert Murdoch's evidence to our committee that the company had a zero tolerance to wrongdoing.

"More importantly it shows he not only failed to report a crime to the police but because there was a confidentiality clause involved in the settlement it means that he bought the silence of (Professional Footballers Association chief executive) Gordon Taylor and that could mean he is facing investigation for perverting the course of justice."

Mr Murdoch, the chairman of News Corporation's British operations and a potential successor to his father, Rupert, as overall chief executive, stood by the evidence he gave to the committee on Tuesday. News Corporation is the ultimate owner of The Weekend Australian.

The split among the former leaders of the NOTW is over the payment of a large secret settlement in a phone hacking case which Mr Watson and other MPs have suggested was an attempt to cover up the extent of the newspaper's voicemail hacking.

Another former News International employee -- the firm's most senior lawyer during the scandal, Jon Chapman -- issued a statement saying there had been "a number of serious inaccuracies" in statements to the committee on Tuesday, when the Murdochs and former chief executive Rebekah Brooks appeared.

MPs suggested this week that News International gave Mr Taylor a large payment with a gag clause to avoid the airing of an email, which would have destroyed the company's claim that hacking at the NOTW was the work of "one rogue reporter", as the company insisted until this year.

Mr Murdoch told the house media committee that when he authorised the payment in April 2008 Mr Crone and Mr Myler had not informed him that Mr Taylor's lawyers had obtained a copy of a highly incriminating email, which showed that the newspaper's chief reporter, Neville Thurlbeck, knew about phone hacking.

Entitled "for Neville", the email was written in 2005 by a junior reporter and contained transcripts of 35 hacked voice messages. "I was not aware of that at the time," Mr Murdoch told the committee.

The payment to Mr Taylor kept the incriminating email under wraps because it was conditional on a gag clause that banned Mr Taylor from revealing even the fact that there was a confidentiality agreement. Mr Crone, who lost his job when the NOTW was shut two weeks ago, told the Evening Standard last week that he would closely watch the Murdochs' evidence to the committee and warned he could speak out "if they completely screw me over".

Yesterday he and Mr Myler issued a joint statement "just by way of clarification relating to Tuesday's select committee hearing".

"We would like to point out that James Murdoch's recollection of what he was told when agreeing to settle the Gordon Taylor litigation was mistaken.

"In fact, we did inform him of the 'for Neville' email which had been produced to us by Gordon Taylor's lawyers."

In a statement issued by News International's parent firm, News Corporation, Mr Murdoch later said: "I stand by my testimony to the select committee."

The committee's chairman, John Whittingdale, said that he would like Mr Murdoch to respond "within a week" to the statement by Mr Myler and Mr Crone.

Matt Nixson, a journalist on the NOTW's sister newspaper, The Sun, was sacked and escorted from News International's premises yesterday over further phone hacking disclosures but the firm said it related to his activities when he worked at the NOTW, not at The Sun.

Amid growing speculation about whether the practice was confined to the NOTW, a former Fleet Street reporter, James Hipwell, has told The Weekend Australian he was likely to make himself available to the judicial inquiry and police to give evidence about phone hacking he says he saw while working at the Daily Mirror.

Mr Hipwell, a former stockmarket columnist, was jailed in 2005 over a stock-rigging scandal at the Mirror.

The FBI said it would contact the actor Jude Law over claims NOTW intercepted one of his voicemails while he was in New York, possibly an offence under US law.

The Wall Street Journal reported the US Justice Department was preparing subpoenas for preliminary investigations into News Corporation relating to alleged foreign bribery and alleged hacking of voicemails of 9/11 victims.

The issuance of subpoenas would represent an escalation of scrutiny of the New York-based media company. While it has sought to isolate the legal problems in Britain, it has been bracing for increased scrutiny in the US from the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission, according to people familiar with the company's strategy.

PI Glenn Mulcaire may lift lid on News of the World's secrets

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/pi-glenn-mulcaire-may-lift-lid-on-news-of-the-worlds-secrets/story-e6freuy9-1226099019755

THE former private investigator at the heart of the phone hacking scandal has hinted he may lift the lid on the News of the World's secrets.

Glenn Mulcaire, 40, was on an alleged 105,000 pounds annual contract to supply the now defunct paper with phone numbers used to hack the voicemails of celebrities, politicians, murder victims, including schoolgirl Milly Dowler, and people killed in the Middle East and terrorism attacks.

Despite being arrested and jailed for his role in phone hacking, Mr Mulcaire's legal fees were paid for by News of the World publisher News International.

But less than 24 hours after News International's James Murdoch dramatically revealed to British lawmakers at Tuesday's phone hacking hearing that Mr Mulcaire was being financially supported, the company announced they had stopped all legal payments to the convicted hacker.

As news of the ceased payments broke yesterday, the father-of-five, who has previously remained tight-lipped on the scandal, spoke to reporters outside his London home.

"As you can appreciate, we are in the middle of a number of inquiries at the moment," Mr Mulcaire said.

"It's a very fluent and developing situation. Like I said, the developments have been different from day to day and I have no further comment to make at this stage.

"However, this may change," he added.

Mr Murdoch denied allegations that Mulcaire's legal payments were hush money, telling MPs he was "as surprised as you are" when he discovered "certain legal fees were paid to Mr Mulcaire" by News International, a sister company to News Limited.

Mr Mulcaire reportedly faces about 24 potential civil law suits from alleged hacking victims.

Files seized by police allegedly reveal Mr Mulcaire had more than 4000 names on a list of potential phone hacking victims.

The High Court yesterday ruled that Scotland Yard must hand over police information to comedy actor Hugh Grant and his ex-girlfriend and socialite Jemima Khan showing that their telephone messages might have been intercepted by Mr Mulcaire.

Speculation is also rampant on Twitter that the late Princess Diana have been a phone hacking victim.

Her brother the Earl of Spencer told BBC's Newsnight that press intrusion had a "pretty massive" effect on his family and that he was certain other newspapers, beside the News of the World, had engaged in phone hacking.

"I am absolutely sure there are other newspaper groups who are waiting for the spotlight to move to them. I know that without a doubt," he said.

Australian pop star Peter Andre, who is a popular celebrity in Britain, also revealed he may have been the victim of alleged phone hacking.

The revelations come as News International yesterday said it had authorised law firm Harbottle & Lewis to answer any questions from Scotland Yard and the Commons Home Affairs Committee about its work for the firm.

The law firm yesterday faced renewed pressure to explain claims that it failed to raise the alarm over evidence of police bribes at News International.

Meanwhile, the New Zealander who last week replaced Rebekah Brooks as News International's chief executive has slammed News of the World phone hackers as lazy, corrupt and having "fake scoops".

Tom Mockridge - a former adviser to former Australian prime minister, Paul Keating, while Keating was Treasurer in the 1980s and the recent head of Sky Italia - told staff at the Times newspaper yesterday that an internal phone hacking investigation would look at other News International titles.

Related News:

No foul play in Hoare death


NO evidence of outside involvement has been found in the death of phone hacking whistleblower Sean Hoare, British police said yesterday.

Hertfordshire police said an autopsy confirmed "no evidence of third party involvement and the death is non-suspicious".

Hoare, in his mid-40s, was the first journalist to declare his former friend and editor at the News of the World, Andy Coulson, knew about the now defunct tabloid's widespread use of phone hacking.

Police hope toxicology tests will solve the riddle of Hoare's death.

AP, PA

British PM says with hindsight, would have not hired Coulson

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/british-pm-says-with-hindsight-would-have-not-hired-coulson/story-fn3dxix6-1226098605518

BRITISH Prime Minister David Cameron admitted today that with hindsight, he would not have hired former News of the World editor Andy Coulson as his media chief.

"People will of course make judgements about it. Of course I regret and I am extremely sorry about the furore it has caused," Cameron said in an emergency statement to parliament on the phone-hacking scandal.

"With 20-20 hindsight and all that has followed, I would not have offered him the job and I expect that he wouldn't have taken it.

"But you don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present. You live and you learn and believe you me, I have learned."

Cameron has come under intense pressure over his decision to hire Coulson, shortly after the journalist quit as editor of the News of the World in 2007 following the jailing of two people at the tabloid over phone hacking.

Coulson has always denied wrongdoing but he was arrested earlier this month on over the scandal, and on allegations of police bribery. He resigned as Downing Street communications chief in January.

The prime minister however refused to formally apologise for hiring Coulson.

He repeated his earlier assertion that if it turned out that Coulson had lied to him about his knowledge of hacking at the News of the World tabloid, and had lied to the police, it would be a matter for criminal charges.

"I have an old-fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty but if it turns out I have been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology," he added.

Andy Coulson

UK PM David Cameron has defended his hiring of Andy Coulson (pictured), the former editor of News of the World.Source: AP

UK Prime Minister David Cameron defends Andy Coulson over hacking

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/uk-prime-minister-david-cameron-defends-andy-coulson-over-hacking/story-e6frfkz9-1226098688737

PRIME Minister David Cameron emphatically denied claims that his staff tried to stop an inquiry into phone hacking and police bribery at the News of the World and defended his decision to hire one of the tabloid's editors as his communications chief.

In a raucous emergency session overnight in parliament, Cameron admitted, however, that both the ruling Conservatives and the opposition Labour parties had failed to pursue key developments in the hacking case over the years.

"The greatest responsibility I have is to clear up this mess," Cameron told MPs, promising that a government inquiry would investigate whether other media organisations besides News of the World also committed illegal acts over the years.

Cameron cut short his Africa trip to appear before the House of Commons, which delayed its summer break to debate issues engulfing Britain's political and media elite and Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, which owned the troubled News of the World.

Cameron's former communications chief Andy Coulson - a former editor at the tabloid - is among 10 people who have been arrested in the scandal. One person has been cleared by police.

MPs want to know why Mr Cameron insisted on hiring Mr Coulson despite warnings and how much the prime minister knew about the phone-hacking investigation.

Some have alleged that some of Mr Cameron's staff may have met with police in an attempt to pressure them to drop the investigation.

"To risk any perception that No 10 (Downing Street) was seeking to influence a sensitive police investigation in any way would have been completely wrong," he said.

Mr Cameron did, however, meet with News Corp executives more than two dozen times from May 2010 to this month - meetings that were criticised in parliament by Labour Party leader Ed Miliband, who said Mr Cameron made a "catastrophic error of judgment" in hiring Mr Coulson.

Mr Cameron defended Mr Coulson's work in government and said if it emerged that Mr Coulson had lied to him about his role in the hacking case he would take it seriously.

"You don't make decisions in hindsight," Mr Cameron said.

Britain's Conservative Party said yesterday it had learned that another recently arrested phone-hacking suspect, former News of the World executive editor Neil Wallis, may have advised Mr Coulson before the 2010 national election that put Mr Cameron into power. It said Wallis was not paid for the advice, however.

Mr Cameron also said the hacking affair raises questions over the ethics and values of London's police force. He told MPs yesterday that he would look at ways to bring in new leadership to Britain's police force and named six people who will assistant Lord Justice Brian Leveson's inquiry into the culture, practices, and ethics of the press.

The scandal has captivated audiences from America to  Australia, and there's more to come; only a fraction of about 3870 people whose names and telephone numbers were found in News of the World files have been contacted by police so far. It remains unknown how many of those names were targeted for hacking.

Yesterday, a judge awarded Notting Hill actor Hugh Grant - one of the most prominent celebrity critics of News Corp - the right to see whether he was one of them.

Meanwhile, a House of Commons committee yesterday blasted both News International, the News Corp unit which operates the British papers, and London Metropolitan Police for their performance on the scandal.

"We deplore the response of News International to the original investigation into hacking. It is almost impossible to escape the conclusion ... that they were deliberately trying to thwart a criminal investigation," said the home affairs committee, which has been grilling past and present Metropolitan Police officials about their decision not to reopen the hacking investigation in 2009.

However, the panel said it was astounded that police would blame the newspaper's tactics for their failure to mount a robust investigation.

"The difficulties were offered to us as justifying a failure to investigate further and we saw nothing that suggested there was a real will to tackle and overcome those obstacles," the committee said.

The committee said it was "appalled" by testimony on Tuesday from Dick Fedorcio, director of public affairs for the Metropolitan Police press office, about a short-term contract given to Wallis to advise the department on press and publicity. Fedorcio testified that he couldn't remember who recommended Wallis and "attempt(ed) to deflect all blame" to Assistant Commissioner John Yates, who has resigned as head of the anti-terrorist command.

The revelation of the Wallis contract led to the resignation on Sunday of the police chief, Paul Stephenson.

Buckingham Palace reacted sharply to a claim by legislator Chris Bryant that the palace had raised concerns with Cameron's office over his decision to hire Mr Coulson.

"It is outrageous to suggest this," said a palace spokesman, speaking on condition of anonymity in line with royal practice.

Hack detectives take a long, hard look in the Mirror

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/hack-detectives-take-a-long-hard-look-in-the-mirror/story-e6frg6so-1226100922087

DETECTIVES investigating phone hacking and corruption at the News of the World are studying evidence of how other British newspapers used illegally obtained crime records from the police national computer.

Last week it emerged that the files from Operation Motorman, an investigation into a private detective in 2003, had been passed to police.

The Sunday Times has obtained details of some of the alleged offences. They reveal how a civilian worker based at a south London police station was trawling criminal records for any information on celebrities.

In April 2005, private investigator Steve Whittamore and Paul Marshall, a communications worker at Tooting police station in London, admitted trading in confidential data.

According to the court files, Whittamore used Marshall to obtain information from the police national computer on several celebrities. In May 2002, he searched for information on Jessie Wallace, who stars in the BBC soap opera EastEnders. The same day, Whittamore called Mirror newspapers at 10.56am.

Three days later, the Sunday Mirror reported that Wallace had once refused to take a breath test and had been involved in a minor offence as a teenager. The headline read: "TV Kat's guilty secrets: she hides criminal past from EastEnders bosses".

Whittamore and Marshall also conducted illegal criminal-record checks on Clifton Tomlinson, the actor Ricky Tomlinson's troubled son, who died in December 2004 from alcoholic liver disease, and Andrew Goody, the father of Jade Goody, the Big Brother contestant who has since died of cancer. Within days of the checks, articles on the individuals appeared in the Sunday Mirror.

The Whittamore files contain 4000 requests from 31 news outlets, including 952 from the Daily Mail, 266 from The Mail on Sunday, 103 from The Observer and four from The Sunday Times.

Many of the requests were legitimate, such as checks on company directorships and the electoral roll, but others could breach data-protection laws unless a public interest can be shown. The maximum penalty for each offence is pound stg. 5000 ($7500).

Trinity Mirror insists its journalists operate within the law and the Press Complaints Commission code, but last week it was facing more allegations.

In an interview with the BBC, a former Sunday Mirror reporter claimed Liz Hurley was among the targets. The source said: " I saw Liz Hurley's phone being hacked and a reporter listen to her mobile phone messages and take a note of what was said . . . I was told there wasn't much on there . . . so they would keep trying to see what they could find." James Hipwell, a former reporter at the Daily Mirror who was jailed for manipulating share prices, also said last week that phone hacking had been used at the paper by show-business reporters. He claimed they were ordered to "trawl the usual suspects", which meant going through voicemails.

Trinity Mirror has written to Britain's Culture, Media and Sport committee about incorrect claims by MP Louise Mensch that Piers Morgan, a former Mirror editor, had admitted phone hacking was used to reveal the affair between Sven-Goran Eriksson, the former England football manager, and television presenter Ulrika Jonsson. Ms Mensch said any correction would be made in parliament.

THE SUNDAY TIMES


http://www.perthnow.com.au/business/media-marketing/more-british-papers-dragged-into-hacking-row/story-e6frg2rc-1226100759163


More British papers dragged into hacking row



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Sean Hoare NOTW Whistle Blower – Murdered because he knew too much?

 
tony roma
come on guys murdoch naaaa.
now mi5 clean up for the government that is different.
Loose lips sink ships.
funny how while the body was still warm nick mi5 davies the greatest journalist in the country was writing an article about how ill sean was.
why would an award winning guardian hack state that it was natural causes before a blood test had even been done.
why even mention sean”s drug taking alcohol binges and yellow skin.
so much for an investigation.
 
 
Sean Hoare, The News of the World journalist who blew the whistle on the corruption in Murdoch’s media and the political class, has been found dead .
Was he murdered because he knew too much?
Let’s examine the facts.
Ever since Rupert Murdoch hired PR giants Edelman  last week, we’ve been seeing a onslaught of activity by News Corp to save it’s battered reputation.
We’ve seen Murdoch’s key Colonel’s Rebekah Brooks  and Les Hinton  leave their positions with the NOTW and WSJ, but rather tellingly, they are still employed by News Corp.
We saw Saudi Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal Alsaud (The largest shareholder in Murdoch’s media empire, after Murdoch himself) wheeled into carrying out presser duties  where he declared his undying love for Murdoch, and blamed the whole situation on a few bad apples within the company.
We saw Britain’s most powerful policeman, Met Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson, quit his post  after he was given a free reported £15,000 holiday at a resort where Neil Wallis , former deputy editor of NOTW, was senior management.
Let’s just work out the formula thus far:
Phone hacking + Big media + Police + Politicians X Corruption =
The coverage on Sean Hoare death has been contemptuous to say the least.
Last night’s BBC Newsnight dedicated all of two minutes  on “discussing” his death.
You would have thought that a media that has been salivating over every nuance and angle connected to this ever widening story would be going into the stratosphere with the news that the man who kick started the whole affair, the man who crucially had not signed any confidentiality agreement with Murdoch’s media and thus was free to speak his mind, winds up dead.
The police of course have already been quick to state that  “The death is currently being treated as unexplained, but not thought to be suspicious”.
What is clear to me is that Sean Hoare knew too much and he couldn’t be paid off.
There will now be a smear campaign against him in the media.
Already I’ve noticed a disturbing pattern with a build up of accusations about his character to undermine his credibility as a reliable source of information – alcoholic, fantasist, paranoid, conspiracy theorist, couldn’t be sure what to believe of what he said, scared of people coming to get him etc etc.
It will be interesting to see if there is a proper coronial inquiry into this death.
As Steve Richards commented in The Independent recently,  “Here was a company that evidently thought it was powerful enough to get away with it, able to block police enquiries and to pay off victims of crime.”
Phone hacking + Big media + Police + Politicians X Corruption = Whistle blower Sean Hoare murdered.
Do the math, no conspiracy theory needed.
What happened to the last whistle blower to break ranks?
Dr. David Kelly was “suicided”.
His formula was very similar.
Iraq + Big media + WMD’s + Politicians X Oil = Whistle blower Dr. David Kelly murdered.
Do the maths, no conspiracy theory needed.
§ Police already closed the case on Sean Hoare the #NOTW #Hackgate  whistle blower murdered because he knew too much http://t.co/uZHWAFv 8 hours ago 
§ #British  say "Thank You"#Americans  say "Awesome Buddy!" That is an Americanisms if there ever was one 8 hours ago 
§ ain't nothing worse than finding a bunch of people you can't stand in your house, talking sh*t & you want peace & quiet#WhenBloodIsSpilled  1 day ago 
§ Hitting the gym. On an "inverted pyramid" training regime. Last few sessions before Ramadan. Find a new way to release anger for 30 days. 1 day ago 
§ Don't be fooled by #Murdoch broken bumbling old man act.Emperor Palpatine is coherent & wrote book on how to play the game.Oscar winning act1 day ago 
§ Did someone just custard pie rupert murdoch? next time I'm in a tight spot, I'll get someone to waltz in & do the same to me...MEETING OVER 1 day ago 
§ Robin Cook & David Kelly - Add Sean Hoare to the list of dissenters who were murdered because they knew too muchhttp://t.co/uZHWAFv  #NOTW 1 day ago 
 
We’d be interested to hear your thoughts in an interview please contact me if you might be able to spare time today for an interview.
Thanks
Lorenzo Ervin
This appears to be a political assassination to silence a critic dangerous to Murdock and news Corp. Murdoch forces clearly were involved with his demise, and Hoare’s death is being covered up by dirty cops on the payroll. Today’s Parliamentary hearings were an embarrassment, with the amount of fear and deerence to R. Murdoch and his son James. This is high level crime, and they are keen to cover it all up.
So this man takes a chunk out of the police, Murdock, the goverment and says he has a fear for his life and then goes and drop dead.
The media are doing all they can to discredit this man using un-named sources but it does look and smells like another Dr David Kelly
tony roma
come on guys murdoch naaaa.
now mi5 clean up for the government that is different.
Loose lips sink ships.
funny how while the body was still warm nick mi5 davies the greatest journalist in the country was writing an article about how ill sean was.
why would an award winning guardian hack state that it was natural causes before a blood test had even been done.
why even mention sean”s drug taking alcohol binges and yellow skin.
so much for an investigation.
Whistle Blower – Murdered because he knew too much?    Sean Hoare NOTW
 
 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 823160
 United Kingdom
7/19/2011 7:20 AM
 
WHO KILLED SEAN HOARE AND IS THE BRITISH PRIME MINISTER MIXED UP IN IT.
 v:shapes="_x0000_i1026">

Who murdered sean hoare was it someone from government ie mI5 
to stop the truth about the prime ministers involvement in this hacking 
probe getting out or was it a police operation done and paid for by the
police to the LONDON underworld CRIMINALS, something is not right 
at all in this case are we going to have another whithall whitewash like 
we did in the so called DR DAVID KELLYS death i suspect so , who the 
hell can you trust anymore the police are corrupt, mp's are corrupt, 
newspapers are corrupt the court system is corrupt , what are we the 
people going to do about it just stand there and watch the government 
and its employess MI5 go around killing willinly and without question. 
This so called partime priminister baby face cameron is mixed up in
this to the eyeballs.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1473663
 v:shapes="_x0000_i1027"> Australia
7/19/2011 7:32 AM
Re: WHO KILLED SEAN HOARE AND IS THE BRITISH PRIME MINISTER MIXED UP IN IT.
uote [+#

I'd say a professional poison killer...Its the easiest most undetected way
to murder someone..I'd say some MI6 young professional..
 
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 815644
 v:shapes="_x0000_i1028"> United States
7/19/2011 7:35 AM
without even knowing who this guy is by name, i could have told you he is the guy that busted Murdoch!

he's been killed by a goon squad and they probably won't find any trail of evidence!

it's just a strange coincidence the guy comes up dead after Murdoch is found to be doing crooked business!
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1460911
United Kingdom
7/19/2011 7:36 AM
Be patient... the impact of all of this on the public consciousness is huge... most are aware our system is corrupt but this has provided the tipping point, and as whistleblowers emerge hourly, the whole thing is like a runaway train that will not stop.
Those who have been involved against their better judgement or more likely forced to comply, are making a stand and doing the right thing!

The people are being shown a glimpse of the extent of the corruption and tyranny, the people have a choice. There are many non-violent options to change the situation.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1402415
United States
7/19/2011 8:36 AM
MI6 on the PM's orders.. brits are living in a slave state.. they are not allowed to see freedom or get out of line.. everything else is just theater
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1155747
 v:shapes="_x0000_i1031"> United Kingdom
7/19/2011 8:38 AM
 
whiterussian
Offer Upgrade
User ID: 1473636
Thailand
7/19/2011 8:45 AM
Very odd... no pin on the live feed.

proof that America is too dumbed down by decades of FOX to care that the Wizard of Oz is about to get busted?
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1474041
United Kingdom
7/19/2011 1:38 PM
the fact that rupert murdoch is being dragged through the dirt by the brits suggests that a larger power struggle is playing out.
thelady
User ID: 1474045
United Kingdom
7/19/2011 1:39 PM
They have been doing it for years, killing the dirt, I found something out that happened in 1962, investigating something that happened to a whole family, 5 years ago I dug up the dirt, "They" frightened me off. I did not want to go the same route as the family in 62.
Anonymous Coward
User ID: 1470364
 United States
7/19/2011 1:47 PM
tptb are getting close to panic mode.


It's a rare thing for a brand to be the focus of such a wave of revulsion
--Simon Middleton, brand strategist

British scandal sheet wracked by scandal of its own

By Bryony Jones, CNN
July 7, 2011

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
(CNN) -- Britain's News of the World newspaper and its parent company News International will likely be seriously damaged by the phone-hacking scandal, analysts say.Experts are divided, though, on how the paper's owner, media magnate Rupert Murdoch, will weather the storm. News International also owns the Sun, the Times and the Sunday Times in Britain. Murdoch's media empire also encompasses Fox News, the Wall Street Journal, the New York Post and Harper Collins publishers in the United States. Journalists at News of the World, a tabloid that is the world's top-selling English-language newspaper, have been accused of hacking into the mobile phone account of missing British teenager Milly Dowler, intercepting messages in search of news. They then allegedly deleted messages to keep her mailbox from filling up, giving her family and friends false hope that the schoolgirl -- later found murdered -- was still alive. Police also are investigating suggestions the paper -- known for its exposes of celebrities and politicians -- may have targeted the relatives of other high profile crime victims, including at least one of those killed in the 2005 London bombings.  The controversy has sparked a "wave of revulsion" towards the weekly, prompting calls for a boycott by both readers and advertisers which look set to hit it this Sunday. Hollywood star Hugh Grant, who says his own phone was hacked by News of the World, is among those encouraging Britons to "vote with their wallets." And several experts have warned that even firing the reporters and editors responsible is unlikely to repair the paper's wrecked reputation. Murdoch has condemned the allegations against News of the World as "deplorable and unacceptable," and said, "We are committed to addressing these issues fully and have taken a number of important steps to prevent them from happening again." But Murdoch insists he is standing by Rebekah Brooks, editor of News of the World at the time and now News International chief executive. In a memo to the newspaper's staff, Brooks said, "it is inconceivable that I knew or worse, sanctioned these appalling allegations." But Murdoch biographer Michael Wolff believes Brooks, whose relationship with Murdoch has often been compared to that of a daughter, is among the high profile heads likely to have to roll. "Rebekah is toast," he told CNN. "It wouldn't be the first time that Rupert has thrown a family member overboard.

""I think the question is, 'Is it too late to fix?' At one point, they could have come forward and said 'this is terrible,' they could have explained it was part of a culture that got out of control, they could have fired everybody, even closed the newspaper.


"Instead they covered it up, and once a cover-up has started, I'm not sure you can back out of it. It may be that the only way to fix it now is to purge the company of people called Murdoch. "Even that, Wolff says, is unlikely to be enough to repair the damage.


Hacking scandal exposes secrets at Murdoch's tabloid

""I think the question is, 'Is it too late to fix?' At one point, they could have come forward and said 'this is terrible,' they could have explained it was part of a culture that got out of control, they could have fired everybody, even closed the newspaper.

Business strategist Simon Middleton, author of "Build a Brand in 30 Days," agrees that the company has gone well beyond the point of instituting basic damage limitation measures. "It's a rare thing for a brand to be the focus of such a wave of revulsion around the country," he told CNN, predicting a "perfect storm" of trouble for the paper following the recent "skin-crawling" revelations. "Firing somebody isn't going to fix this. It will take years," he said. Middleton said the impact of the phone-hacking scandal could spread far beyond the News of the World -- and that the paper itself may not survive. "It's like a family: If one member gets a bad reputation, the others can be tarnished too -- you get damage by association, and that could be the case for the other papers in News International stable. "The whole Murdoch empire is tarnished by it. The wider Murdoch empire is big enough to survive, but I'm not so sure about the News of the World." But media analyst Claire Enders said the scandal was unlikely to affect Murdoch's business on a global level. "News International is still immensely powerful. The story is not making much impact outside the UK." Middleton said that - like an alcoholic recognizing he has a drink problem -- the paper's only hope was to acknowledge its faults and say it's sorry - before rebuilding from scratch. "Brands that have made big mistakes have been forgiven in the past, but only after they recognized that they got it wrong, and apologized," he said.


Experts say heads are likely to roll over the hacking scandal -- but Rupert Murdoch insists he is standing by Rebekah Brooks.
Experts say heads are likely to roll over the hacking scandal -- 
but Rupert Murdoch insists he is standing by Rebekah Brooks.







News International whistleblower's death 'non-suspicious,' police say

By the CNN Wire Staff

The Question in everyone' mind is...
The statement by the London Met Police that mysterious sudden death on the 18th July, 2011 of Sean Hoare the whistleblower into illegal phone hacking- illegal blinging and illegal police bribes at Rupert Murdoch's News International-NEWS OF THE WORLD a subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch's  all powerful News Corp, the day before the start of the Parliamentary  Select Committee into illegal phone hacking- illegal blinging and illegal police bribes at Rupert Murdoch's News International-NEWS OF THE WORLD a subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch's  all powerful News Corp due to start on the 19th July, 2011 is the most suspicious press release statement the London Met Police has ever released and that statement it self makes the ordinary person on the street wonder if the London Met Police at a very high ranking level with the help of organisations like MI5 and MI6 who would capable of the murder of Whistleblower Sean Hoare  in such a way that it all looks to the public as death by natural causes... if is starting to become well known that organisations like MI5, MI6, the CIA, Mossad, the KGB etc have drugs that can cause death such as a heart attach within 24 hours of unwittingly taking them in a glass of water or a cup of tea... that are absolutely undetectable by any autopsy or post-mortam and have no colour or taste so the drug can be placed in a clear glass or bottle of water and the person who drank the water would never guess or know  that this drug had been placed into the water he or she was drinking... that is how the well known multi millionaire Western Australian businessman and and financier Laurie Connel was murdered when he threatened to expaose many of the most powerful people in political and business circles in Australia during his contraversial fraud trial where Mr Connel ended up deciding to represent himself after sacking his large team of attorneys who Mr Connel said he could no longer trust..  " James Kleck Editor of www.awn.bz and USAWeeklynews.com 

London (CNN) -- Investigators have found no sign of foul play in the death of a man identified as the whistleblower behind the scandal surrounding media mogul Rupert Murdoch's News International, British police announced Tuesday.
Sean Hoare was one of the first journalists to go on the record and allege phone hacking at Murdoch's now-defunct News of the World. He was found dead Monday at his home in Watford, northwest of London, the British Press Association said.
An autopsy conducted Tuesday afternoon "has concluded there is no evidence of third-party involvement and the death is non-suspicious," Hertfordshire police said in a statement. Earlier, police had called his death "unexplained, but not thought to be suspicious."

Hoare had publicly accused News of the World of phone-hacking and using "pinging" -- a method of tracking someone's cell phone using technology that only police and security officials could access -- according to the New York Times. He was one of the few sources who allowed his name to be used when speaking to the Times last year for an investigative report about allegations of phone-hacking by the British tabloid, which was shuttered last weekend as the scandal grew.
The rapidly metastasizing scandal has led to the resignations of several of Murdoch's top lieutenants and of the two top officials of London's Metropolitan Police, whose officers were accused of taking payments from journalists in exchange for confidential information.
The scandal has led to 10 arrests, including those of two former News of the World editors, Andy Coulson and Rebekah Brooks. Brooks' arrest came two days after her resignation as head of News International, the British subsidiary of Murdoch's global conglomerate News Corp., while Coulson had gone on to become Prime Minister David Cameron's communications director.
Hoare specifically accused Coulson of wrongdoing, saying Coulson "encouraged" phone-hacking." Coulson resigned his Downing Street post in January when police launched a new probe into the hacking allegations.
The Times described Hoare has a "onetime close friend of Coulson's." The report added that Hoare said he was "fired during a period when he was struggling with drugs and alcohol. He said he was now revealing his own use of the dark arts -- which included breaking into the messages of celebrities like David and Victoria Beckham -- because it was unfair for the paper to pin the blame solely on" one reporter who covered the royal family.
Hoare "repeatedly expressed the hope that the hacking scandal would lead to journalism in general being cleaned up and said he had decided to blow the whistle on the activities of some of his former News of the World colleagues with that aim in mind," Britain's The Guardian newspaper reported Monday.
His allegations ultimately led to Tuesday's testimony by Murdoch to a House of Commons committee, where he denied ultimate responsibility for illegal phone hacking carried out by his employees.
"I feel that the people I trusted, I don't know at what level, let me down and I think they behaved disgracefully, betrayed the company and me, and it's for them to pay," he said. "I think that frankly I'm the best person to clear this up."

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
NEW: Sean Hoare's death was declared "non-suspicious" after an autopsy

Hoare told the New York Times the phone hacking included celebrities' phone

His death comes amid a widening scandal around Rupert Murdoch's media empire


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Today's five most popular stories

British scandal sheet wracked by scandal of its own

By Bryony Jones, CNN
July 7, 2011

STORY HIGHLIGHTSNews of the World accused of hacking phones of murder victims, dead soldiers

Former editor Rebekah Brooks says it is "inconceivable" she knew of scandal

Analysts say Brooks and others are likely to lose their jobs over the controversy

News of the World's brand and reputation may be irreparably damaged, experts claim


Rupert Murdoch (L) is pictured leaving his London residence with Rebekah Brooks (R) on July 10
Rupert Murdoch (L) is pictured leaving his London residence with Rebekah Brooks (R) on July 10.

Rebekah Brooks, ex-editor for News of the World, quit as News International chief executive over the hacking scandal.
Rebekah Brooks, ex-editor for News of the World, quit as News International chief executive over the hacking scandal



Hacking scandal: Who is Rebekah Brooks?

Hacking scandal: Who is Rebekah Brooks?  By Bryony Jones, CNN
July 19, 2011 --

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Rebekah Brooks resigns as chief executive of News International, is arrested and questioned by police
  • Brooks had agreed to testify before British lawmakers in the phone hacking scandal
  • Brooks became the youngest-ever editor of a national British newspaper in 2000
  • Murdoch is said to treat Brooks like a daughter
  • London (CNN) -- Rebekah Brooks, who resigned on Friday as chief executive of News International, was the youngest person ever to edit a national British newspaper, and made a stellar rise through the ranks of Rupert Murdoch's media empire.
  • She held the top job at News International, the News Corp.'s British subsidiary, for two years after editing the country's best-selling daily tabloid, the Sun, and its best-selling Sunday tabloid, the News of the World. But following sweeping allegations of illegal eavesdropping by News of the World journalists when she was editor, British lawmakers asked her to testify before a parliamentary committee investigating the scandal. She has agreed to appear on July 19, alongside former boss Rupert Murdoch and his son James. She held the top job at News International, the News Corp.'s British subsidiary, for two years after editing the country's best-selling daily tabloid, the Sun, and its best-selling Sunday tabloid, the News of the World. But following sweeping allegations of illegal eavesdropping by News of the World journalists when she was editor, British lawmakers asked her to testify before a parliamentary committee investigating the scandal. She has agreed to appear on July 19, alongside former boss Rupert Murdoch and his son James. However, following her arrest by police investigating the hacking scandal on Sunday, it is unclear if she will answer MPs' questions. Brought up in Cheshire, northern England, in the 1970s, Rebekah Brooks is said to have decided on a career in journalism at the age of 14, beginning with a job as a "tea girl" at her local paper. In her late teens, she moved to Paris, where she is reported to have worked at architectural magazineL'Architecture d'aujourd'hui and studied at the Sorbonne. On her return to the UK, she worked in regional papers before making the move to Sunday tabloid News of the World in the late 1980s. Starting out as a secretary, Rebekah Wade -- her maiden name -- swiftly made her way up the editorial food chain, becoming deputy editor by the age of 27. She tells of how, at a corporate golf day shortly after she was appointed, one senior executive ordered her to sew the buttons back on his shirt. Sexism in the workplace aside, Brooks' rise through the ranks continued. She was named deputy editor of the hugely popular Sun newspaper, the News of the World's sister title, in 1998. In 2000, she returned to the News of the World, this time in the top job, becoming the youngest-ever editor of a national British paper. While editor of the weekly, Brooks argued for the creation of a U.S.-style "Sarah's Law," which would allow parents with young children to know about anyone convicted of child sex crimes living close to their homes. As part of the controversial campaign, which was inspired by the murder of eight-year-old Sarah Payne in July 2000, Brooks took the decision to name and shame offenders in the pages of her paper. The lists sparked witch-hunts and riots, as communities across Britain tried to hound pedophiles out of their neighborhoods. It was condemned by police, but Brooks remains unrepentant. In a 2009 speech, she admitted the campaign was "a blunt and contentious way of informing the public... hard lessons were learnt but I don't regret the campaign for one minute." She married soap star Ross Kemp, famous for his hard-man role as Grant Mitchell in long-running British TV show "Eastenders." In 2003, she was promoted again, becoming editor of the Sun. In addition to working for two of the UK's most famous tabloids, Brooks hit the headlines herself on a number of occasions. In March 2003 she courted controversy -- and hinted at the scandal to come -- when, appearing before a government committee, she admitted that her paper had paid police officers for information. Two years later, in November 2005, she was arrested after an alleged assault on her then-husband, Kemp. No charges were ever filed against her. The couple divorced in 2009. Later the same year she married horse trainer Charlie Brooks. The couple's wedding party was attended by a host of big names, including the Murdoch clan (Rupert, James and Elisabeth), then-Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and future-Prime Minister David Cameron. Brooks held the Sun post until 2009 when she was handpicked for the role of News International chief executive by Rupert Murdoch. The pair had been close for many years: Murdoch is said to treat Brooks like a daughter.

Timeline of the UK phone hacking scandal

By the CNN Wire Staff
July 19, 2011

Editor's Note: Watch UK lawmakers question Rupert Murdoch, James Murdoch and Rebekah Brooks live from 1:30 p.m. GMT / 9:30 a.m. ET Tuesday on CNN.com and also via CNN Apps including iPhone, iPad, Android and selected Nokia devices. Also watch lawmakers question leading members of the Metropolitan Police including former chief Paul Stephenson from 11 a.m. GMT / 7 a.m. ET Tuesday.
London (CNN) -- Accusations that journalists at Rupert Murdoch's British newspapers hacked into the phones of politicians, celebrities and unwitting people caught up in the news -- including child murder victims -- have severely bruised his media empire.
It has forced the closure of Britain's biggest-selling paper, a withdrawal for his bid for the broadcaster BSkyB and the resignation of his trusted UK chief executive Rebekah Brooks.
The following is a timeline of the scandal:
November 2005
News of the World prints a story about Prince William injuring his knee, prompting royal officials to complain to police about probable voice mail hacking.
January 2007
News of the World royal editor Clive Goodman and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire are convicted of conspiracy to hack into phone voice mails of royals and are jailed. Andy Coulson, the paper's editor, claims to be unaware of hacking but still resigns.
July 2007
Goodman and Mulcaire sue the tabloid for wrongful dismissal. Goodman receives £80,000 (currently $129,000) and Mulcaire receives an undisclosed amount.
.
Also in July, Andy Coulson is hired as director of communications for Conservative party leader David Cameron, who becomes prime minister in May 2010.
June 2008
News Group Newspapers pays a £700,000 ($1.13 million) settlement to soccer executive Gordon Taylor, whose phone was hacked by Mulcaire.
November 2009
Britain's Press Complaints Commission releases a report concluding that there is no evidence of continued phone hacking.
March 2010
A celebrity public relations agent agrees to drop his lawsuit against News of the World for a payment of more than £1 million ($1.6 million).
September 2010
Former News of the World journalist Sean Hoare alleges that phone hacking was a common practice at the paper and encouraged by Coulson.
January 21, 2011
Coulson resigns as Cameron's spokesman because of coverage of the phone-hacking scandal.
January 26, 2011
London's Metropolitan Police launch a new investigation into voice mail hacking allegations at News of the World.
April 5, 2011
News of the World chief reporter Neville Thurlbeck and former editor Ian Edmondson are arrested on suspicion of intercepting voice mail messages.
April 10, 2011
News of the World officially apologizes for hacking into voice mails from 2004 to 2006 and sets up a compensation system for unnamed victims.
April 14, 2011
Senior News of the World journalist James Weatherup is arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to intercept communications.
June 7, 2011
Actress Sienna Miller settles with News of the World for £100,000 ($161,000) in damages and legal fees.
June 23, 2011
Freelance journalist Terenia Taras is arrested on suspicion of phone hacking.
July 4, 2011
It is revealed that News of the World journalists possibly hacked into then-missing teenager Milly Dowler's voice mail and deleted messages to free space, causing her parents to believe she was still alive.
July 6, 2011
Rupert Murdoch, CEO of News Corp., the parent company of News of the World owner News International, promises full cooperation with the investigation and calls the accusations against News of the World "deplorable and unacceptable."
July 7, 2011
News International announces that the July 10 edition of News of the World will be the paper's last.
July 8, 2011
Coulson is arrested. Goodman, the paper's former royal correspondent who served a four-month jail term in 2007, is also arrested on corruption allegations.
July 10, 2011
The 168-year-old News of the World publishes its final edition with the headline "Thank you and goodbye."
Rupert Murdoch flies into London to take personal charge of the crisis.
July 11, 2011
Former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown accuses other News International papers of illegally obtaining private information about him.
July 12, 2011
British lawmakers ask Rupert and James Murdoch and Brooks to testify before them.
July 13, 2011
-- News Corp. withdraws its bid to take over British satellite broadcaster BSkyB.
-- UK Prime Minister Cameron announces a wide-ranging public inquiry into the British press.
July 14, 2011
-- The FBI launches an investigation into allegations that News Corp. employees or associates hacked into the phones of 9/11 victims, a federal source says.
-- Rupert and James Murdoch agree to give evidence to a committee of British lawmakers.
-- A 60-year-old man, widely reported to be Neil Wallis, a former executive editor of the News of the World, is arrested.
July 15, 2011
-- Brooks resigns as chief executive of News International.
-- Les Hinton resigns as head of Dow Jones and publisher of The Wall Street Journal; he was Brooks' predecessor at News International.
-- Rupert Murdoch visits the family of murdered teenager Milly Dowler, whose voice mail had been hacked.
July 16, 2011
Rupert Murdoch apologizes to the British public with full-page advertisements in seven national newspapers.
July 17, 2011
-- Rebekah Brooks is arrested, questioned for about nine hours, and released on bail until October, police and her spokesman say.
-- Metropolitan Police Commissioner Paul Stephenson -- who leads London's police and is the UK's highest ranking policeman -- resigns. It comes after revelations that former News of the World executive editor Neil Wallis later became a communications consultant for the police.
Stephenson says he decided to resign because increased scrutiny connected to the case would burden his department and detract from its accomplishments.
July 18, 2011
-- News International places more ads in UK newspapers, explaining how it is "putting right what's gone wrong."
-- Former reporter Sean Hoare is found dead. Police say the death is being treated as "unexplained" but not "suspicious."
-- Assistant police Commissioner John Yates, who ruled two years ago that there was no reason to pursue an investigation into phone hacking by journalists, also resigns. He was due to be suspended when he quit, police said.
-- The hacker collective, LulzSec, claims credit for hacking the website of the News Corp. paper, The Sun. It redirects those on the paper's website to a false story claiming Murdoch had been found dead in his garden.
July 19, 2011
-- Murdoch, his son James and Brooks are set to appear in parliament on Tuesday to answer questions about the phone scandal.






Crime and Punishment

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Rupert Murdoch's News of the World phone-hacking whistle-blower, Sean Hoare, found dead
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By Les Blough, Editor, Axis of Logic. News article (BBC)
Axis of Logic. BBC
Tuesday, Jul 19, 2011

In their report below, the BBC announces the sudden and "unexplained" death of Sean Hoare, a former News of the World reporter and before that a reporter at The Sun, who blew the British media and political establishment wide open. He left News of the world in 2005. In March, Mr. Hoare told theBBC that illegal phone hacking was "endemic" at News of the World, a British newspaper owned by Rupert Murdoch that sold 2.7 million copies a week. In that report, the BBC led their program by depicting Mr. Hoare as a drug addict. Last week, the New York times reported that Mr. Hoare told them that News of the World paid police to use technology that could track people through their mobile phone signals.Yesterday morning (Monday, July 18, 2011) Hertfordshire police discovered Mr. Hoare's body in the garden outside his home north of London. They said they went to his house because they had concerns for his welfare.
Sean Hoare's revelations have implicated everyone from low level members in media to names of media mogul Rupert Murdoch, British Parliamentarians and Britain's present and former prime ministers, David Cameron, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Tony Blair. AP reported:
"The scandal has come uncomfortably close to Prime Minister David Cameron, who, like predecessors Gordon Brown and Tony Blair, courted the powerful Murdoch empire whose endorsement is considered capable of swinging elections."
The many who have been arrested include arrested have been: Rebekah Brooks, a Murdoch Aide and Chief Executive of his News International: Andy Coulson, Editor of News of the World; and former royal editor Clive Goodman. Rebekah Brooks is/was a close personal friend of Brown, Cameron and Blair. Coulson is central to these crimes in which he links the scandal to Prime Minister David Cameron for whom he worked as communications chief.In the week past, Britain's Top Cop, Sir Paul Stephenson and Assistant Police Commissioner, John Yates were forced to resign due to corruption and their links to Murdoch's media empire.
"Mushrooming allegations of immoral and criminal behavior at the paper — including bribing police officers for information, hacking into the voice mail of murdered schoolgirls' families and targeting the phones of the relatives of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and the victims of the London transit attacks. Police say they are examining 4,000 names of people who may have been targeted by the tabloid, which sells about 2.7 million copies a week."
Think there is enough motivation in all this for people burned by the whistleblower to kill him - either for revenge or to eliminate him as a witness? Well, the BBC reassures us otherwise by stating not once - but twice that Sean Hoare's death was "unexpected" but "not thought to be suspicious."
"A police spokesman said the death was currently being treated as unexplained, but was not thought to be suspicious."
With Britain's top police officials resigning over this, why are we now expected to believe their 'spokesman?'
In another report, Associated Press is quick to nail Sean Hoare's coffin lid down with an assassination of his character accusing the dead man of being,
"the kind of reporter who could knock back several whiskeys and a few lines of cocaine before filing salacious stories of celebrity misbehavior ... ahard partier who got high and drunk with the celebrities ... of starting the day with a " 'rock star's breakfast' — a line of cocaine and a Jack Daniel's ... of heavy drinking and drug-taking [which] became problematic ... angry that he was being treated like a suspect rather than a witness [and of] struggling with addiction."
In the end of their salacious story, AP tried to cover their character assassination by throwing in a tidbit of redemption Sean Hoare by quoting David Yelland, former editor of The Sun in a mixed message:
"Sean Hoare was trying to be honest, struggling with addiction. But he was a good man. My God." On a BBC program broadcast Monday night, Hoare said phone hacking was "endemic" in his former newspaper.
Of course Sean is no longer here to defend himself.
The corporate media and their imperial bosses are scrambling to distance themselves of the same practices employed by News of the World. They are hard pressed to bury this story as quickly and simply as Sean Hoare has been buried. Some think they will be successful. Others think this story has gone far to deep and wide and that more revelations and arrests among heads of media and government will continue to blow up in their faces.
- Les Blough, Editor
 

NoW phone-hacking whistle-blower Sean Hoare found dead
BBC
July 19, 2011
A former News of the World journalist who made phone-hacking allegations against the paper has been found dead at his home in Watford.
Mr Hoare had told the New York Times hacking was far more extensive than the paper acknowledged when police first investigated hacking claims.
Sean Hoare also told the BBC's Panorama phone hacking was "endemic" at the NoW.
A police spokesman said the death was currently being treated as unexplained, but was not thought to be suspicious.
Meanwhile computer hackers have tampered with the website of The Sun, which is also owned by News International.
Readers were briefly directed to a hoax story which said Rupert Murdoch has been found dead in his garden.
A group of hackers called Lulz Security, which has previously targeted games companies and US government websites, claimed responsibility via Twitter.
Visitors to the Sun website were redirected to the group's Twitter page.
News International said it was "aware" of what was happening but made no further comment.
Earlier Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner John Yates resigned after growing pressure amid the phone-hacking scandal.
It has also emerged that a former senior News of the World (NoW) journalist carried out work for Scotland Yard dealing with witnesses and suspects while employed by the paper.
Alex Marunchak was employed by the Met as a Ukrainian language interpreter and was on Scotland Yard's list of interpreters between 1980 and 2000.
According to the BBC's Panorama, the former NoW Irish edition editor obtained e-mails hacked into by a private detective in 2006. Mr Marunchak denied receiving "any unlawfully obtained material".
In a statement, the Met said it would look into the matter, saying: "We recognise that this may cause concern and that some professions may be incompatible with the role of an interpreter."
Hertfordshire Police said Mr Hoare's body was discovered after police were called to his home in Langley Road, Watford at 1040 BST on Monday.
They said: "The death is currently being treated as unexplained, but not thought to be suspicious. Police investigations into this incident are ongoing."
When he first spoke out, Mr Hoare told Panorama the then NoW editor Andy Coulson had asked him to hack phones - something Mr Coulson has denied.
Suspension move

Earlier, Met Police Assistant Commissioner John Yates resigned after he was informed he would be suspended pending an inquiry into his links with a former NoW journalist.
Mr Yates had checked the credentials of the paper's former deputy editor Neil Wallis before he too was employed by the Met.
Mr Wallis was arrested and released on bail on Thursday on suspicion of conspiring to intercept communications.
Met Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson, the most senior policeman in Britain, resigned on Sunday after also facing criticism for the force's recruitment of Mr Wallis as a PR consultant.
A former News of the World journalist who made phone-hacking allegations against the paper has been found dead at his home in Watford.
Mr Hoare had told the New York Times hacking was far more extensive than the paper acknowledged when police first investigated hacking claims.
Sean Hoare also told the BBC's Panorama phone hacking was "endemic" at the NoW.
A police spokesman said the death was currently being treated as unexplained, but was not thought to be suspicious.
Meanwhile computer hackers have tampered with the website of The Sun, which is also owned by News International.
Readers were briefly directed to a hoax story which said Rupert Murdoch has been found dead in his garden.
A group of hackers called Lulz Security, which has previously targeted games companies and US government websites, claimed responsibility via Twitter.
Visitors to the Sun website were redirected to the group's Twitter page.
News International said it was "aware" of what was happening but made no further comment.
Earlier Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner John Yates resigned after growing pressure amid the phone-hacking scandal.
It has also emerged that a former senior News of the World (NoW) journalist carried out work for Scotland Yard dealing with witnesses and suspects while employed by the paper.
Alex Marunchak was employed by the Met as a Ukrainian language interpreter and was on Scotland Yard's list of interpreters between 1980 and 2000.
Mayor of London Boris Johnson said Deputy Commissioner Tim Godwin would be in charge at Scotland Yard until Sir Paul's replacement was appointed. Mr Yates will be replaced in the interim as the Met's head of counter-terrorism by Assistant Commissioner Cressida Dick.
Mr Johnson said it was right for both Sir Paul and Mr Yates to stand down. Mr Yates said his conscience was clear and had "deep regret" over his resignation.
Job probe

The IPCC said four referrals relating to the police's phone-hacking investigation involved Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson, who resigned on Sunday, and Mr Yates, as well as two other former senior officers.
The BBC understands the other two officers are former Assistant Commissioner Andy Hayman and former Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke.
A fifth referral relates to the alleged involvement of Mr Yates in inappropriately securing a job at the Met for the daughter of a friend.
The BBC understands the woman to be Amy Wallis, daughter of Mr Wallis, and she works in a civilian non-operational role.
In the Commons, Home Secretary Theresa May announced Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary would look into corruption in the police, and an Independent Police Complaints Commission investigation on the same issue would be part of the judge-led inquiry into the hacking scandal.
Source: BBC

Latin America

Other World News

Murdoch Meltdown: News Corp Imploding; Raising Questions about Corporate Personhood

By Rob Kall
OpEd News
Saturday, Jul 16, 2011

The recent developments unfolding at News Corp challenge the idea of corporate personhood and whether justice can really be served when corporations are given the privileges of personhood. There are also the aspects of accountability that come with being considered a person. 

The events at News Corp Are raising some very thorny questions. Two of the top people at News Corp have resigned. The NY Times reports
Les Hinton, the publisher of The Wall Street Journal since 2007, who oversaw Mr. Murdoch's British newspaper subsidiary when voice mail hacking by journalists was rampant, and Rebekah Brooks, who has run the British papers since 2009 and become the target of unrelenting public outrage, both resigned in the latest blow to the News Corporation and its besieged chairman.
Many former staffers of News Corp have been arrested in England. The FBI has begun an investigation into whether News Corp staffers hacked or tapped the phones of 911 victims.
There are major questions in England about whether News Corp staffers bribed police and other officials. This is a federal crime-- if a US citizen or his representatives engages in bribery in another country.
That raises some interesting questions based on the Supreme Court's recent Citizens United decision.
If a corporation is rife with corruption. If numerous top officials in the company are suspected of participation in criminal activity, can the company be charged with crimes. If so, can it be tried and convicted. If so, and it is found guilty, can punishments set for individuals be applied to the company?
If the sentence for a human would be death or incarceration, would that mean shutting down or stopping the company from doing any of its usual business for the duration of the sentence? Of course, preventing a company from doing any business would be like a death penalty.
That raises the question of whether it is possible to treat a company like a person in terms of justice. We know that companies can pursue to positive rights of personhood, but if they can not be held accountable when it comes to crimes, perhaps the supreme court should be required to take a look at its past decisions on the rights of corporate personhood. Perhaps it is time that corporations lose those rights... or that the state of personhood for corporations also include the liabilities, particularly those of facing punishment.
If there was ever a criminal corporation, then News Corp appears to be one, and we might throw in Haliburton and KBR and Monsanto as well. It is time for America to re-assess corporate personhood.
Rob Kall is executive editor, publisher and site architect of OpEdNews.com, Host of the Rob Kall Bottom Up Radio Show (WNJC 1360 AM), President of Futurehealth, Inc. He is also published regularly on the Huffingtonpost.com
Source: OpEd News


Finding Clarity
Latin America


Multi-Billion-Dollar Terrorists and the Disappearing Middle Class



Every Predator drone in use in Afghanistan cost taxpayers $4.5 million. And a third of them crash.


AGM-114 Hellfire missile hung on the rail of an US Air Force (USAF) MQ-1L Predator Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) 

Dec. 1, 2010 - An AGM-114 Hellfire missile hung on the rail of an US Air Force (USAF) MQ-1L Predator Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is inscribed with, "In Memory of Honorable Ronald Reagan." Every single Hellfire missile fired in Afghanistan costs $58,000.00. U.S. and allied forces are dropping huge numbers of these bombs in Afghanistan this year: So far this year, coalition aircraft have used 4,615 bombs and Hellfire missiles, already exceeding the 4,184 dropped in all of last year.

By James Petras. Axis of Logic
Axis of Logic
Sunday, Jul 10, 2011

The US government (White House and Congress) spends $10 billion dollars a month, or $120 billion a year, to fight an estimated “50 -75 ‘Al Qaeda types’ in Afghanistan”, according to the CIA and quoted in the Financial Times of London (6/25 -26/11, p. 5). During the past 30 months of the Obama presidency, Washington has spent $300 billion dollars in Afghanistan, which adds up to $4 billion dollars for each alleged ‘Al Queda type’. If we multiply this by the two dozen or so sites and countries where the White House claims ‘Al Qaeda’ terrorists have been spotted, we begin to understand why the US budget deficit has grown astronomically to over $1.6 trillion for the current fiscal year.
During Obama’s Presidency, Social Security’s cost-of-living adjustment has been frozen, resulting in a net decrease of over 8 percent, which is exactly the amount spent chasing just 5 dozen ‘Al Qaeda terrorists’ in the mountains bordering Pakistan.
It is absurd to believe that the Pentagon and White House would spend $10 billion a month just to hunt down a handful of terrorists ensconced in the mountains of Afghanistan. So what is the war in Afghanistan about? The answer one most frequently reads and hears is that the war is really against the Taliban, a mass-based Islamic nationalist guerrilla movement with tens of thousands of activists.
The Taliban, however, have never engaged in any terrorist act against the territorial United States or its overseas presence. The Taliban have always maintained their fight was for the expulsion of foreign forces occupying Afghanistan. Hence the Taliban is not part of any “international terrorist network”. If the US war in Afghanistan is not about defeating terrorism, then why the massive expenditure of funds and manpower for over a decade?
Several hypotheses come to mind
The first is the geopolitics of Afghanistan: The US is actively establishing forward military bases, surrounding and bordering on China.
Secondly, US bases in Afghanistan serve as launching pads to foment “dissident separatist” armed ethnic conflicts and apply the tactics of ‘divide and conquer’ against Iran, China, Russia and Central Asian republics.
Thirdly, Washington’s launch of the Afghan war (2001) and the easy initial conquest encouraged the Pentagon to believe that a low cost, easy military victory was at hand, one that could enhance the image of the US as an invincible power, capable of imposing its rule anywhere in the world, unlike the disastrous experience of the USSR.
Fourthly, the early success of the Afghan war was seen as a prelude to the launching of a sequence of successful wars, first against Iraq and to be followed by Iran, Syria and beyond. These would serve the triple purpose of enhancing Israeli regional power, controlling strategic oil resources and enlarging the arc of US military bases from South and Central Asia, through the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean.
The strategic policies, formulated by the militarists and Zionists in the Bush and Obama Administrations, assumed that guns, money, force and bribes could build stable satellite states firmly within the orbit of the post-Soviet US empire. Afghanistan was seen as an easy first conquest the initial step to sequential wars. Each victory, it was assumed would undermine domestic and allied (European) opposition. The initial costs of imperial war, the Neo-Cons claimed, would be paid for by wealth extracted from the conquered countries, especially from the oil producing regions.
The rapid US defeat of the Taliban government confirmed the belief of the military strategists that “backward”, lightly armed Islamic peoples were no match up for the US powerhouse and its astute leaders.
Wrong Assumptions, Mistaken Strategies: The Trillion Dollar Disaster

Every assumption, formulated by these civilian strategists and their military counterparts, has been proven wrong. Al Qaeda was and is a marginal adversary; the real force capable of sustaining a prolonged peoples wars against an imperial occupier, inflicting heavy casualties, undermining any local puppet regime and accumulating mass support is the Taliban and related nationalist resistance movements. Israeli-influenced US think-tanks, experts and advisers who portrayed the Islamic adversaries as inept, ineffective and cowardly, totally misread the Afghan resistance. Blinded by ideological antipathy, these high-ranking advisers and White House/Pentagon civilian-office holders failed to recognize the tactical and strategic, political and military acumen of the top and middle-level Islamist nationalist leaders and their tremendous reserve of mass support in neighboring Pakistan and beyond.

The Obama White House, heavily dependent on Islamophobic pro-Israel experts, further isolated the US troops and alienated the Afghan population by tripling the number of troops, further establishing the credentials of the Taliban as the authentic alternative to a foreign occupation.
As for the neo-conservative pipe dreams of successful sequential wars, cooked up by the likes of Paul Wolfowitz, Feith, Abrams, Libby et al, to eliminate Israel’s adversaries and turn the Persian Gulf into a Hebrew lake, the prolonged wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan has, in fact, strengthened Iran’s regional influence, turned the entire Pakistani people against the US and strengthened mass movements against US clients throughout the Middle East.
Sequential imperial defeats have resulted in a massive hemorrhage of the US treasury, rather than the promised flood of oil wealth from tributary clients. According to a recent scholarly study, the military cost of the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan have exceeded $3.2 trillion dollars (“The Costs of War Since 2001”, Eisenhower Study Group, June 2011) and is growing at over ten billion a month. Meanwhile the Taliban “tightens (its) psychological grip” on Afghanistan (FT 6/30/2011, p. 8). According to the latest reports even the most guarded 5-star hotel in the center of Kabul, the Intercontinental, was vulnerable to a sustained assault and take over by militants, because “high security Afghan forces” are infiltrated and the Taliban operate everywhere, having established “shadow” governments in most cities, towns and villages (FT 6/30/11 p.8).
Imperial Decline, Empty Treasury and the Specter of a Smash-Up
The crumbling empire has depleted the US treasury. As the Congress and White House fight over raising the debt ceiling, the cost of war aggressively erodes any possibility of maintaining stable living standards for the American middle and working classes and heightens growing inequalities between the top 1% and the rest of the American people. Imperial wars are based on the pillage of the US treasury. The imperial state has, via extraordinary tax exemptions, concentrated wealth in the hands of the super-rich while the middle and working classes have been pushed downward, as only low paid jobs are available. In 1974, the top 1% of US individuals accounted for 8% of total national income but as of 2008 they earned 18% of national income. And most of this 18% is concentrated in the hands of a tiny super-rich 1% of that 1%, or 0.01% of the American population, (FT 6/28/11, p. 4 and 6/30/11, p. 6). While the super-rich plunder the treasury and intensify the exploitation of labor, the number of middle income jobs is plunging: From 1993 to 2006, over 7% of middle income jobs disappeared (FT 6/30/11, p. 4).
While inequalities may be rising throughout the world, the US now has the greatest inequalities among all the leading capitalist countries. The burden of sustaining a declining empire, with its the monstrous growth in military spending, has fallen disproportionately on middle and working class taxpayers and wage earners. The military and financial elites’ pillage of the economy and treasury has set in motion a steep decline in living standards, income and job opportunities. Between 1970 -2009, while gross domestic product more than doubled, US median pay stagnated in real terms (FT7/28/11, p. 4). If we factor in the added fixed costs of pensions, health and education, real income for wage and salaried workers, especially since the 1990’s, has been declining sharply.
Even greater blows are to come in the second half 2011: As the Obama White House expands its imperial interventions in Pakistan, Libya and Yemen, increasing military and police-state spending, Obama is set to reach budgetary agreements with the far right Republicans, which will savage government health care programs, like MEDICARE and MEDICAID, as well as Social Security, the national retirement program. Prolonged wars have pushed the budget to the breaking point, while the deficit undermines any capacity to revive the economy as it heads toward a ‘repeat recession’.
The entire political establishment is bizarrely oblivious to the fact that their multi-hundred- billion-dollar pursuit of an estimated 50-75 phantom Al Qaeda terrorists in Afghanistan has hastened the disappearance of middle income jobs in the US.
The entire political spectrum has turned decisively to the Right and the Far-Right. The debate between Democrats and Republicans is over whether to slash four trillion or more from the last remnants of our country’s social programs.
The Democrats and the Far-Right are united as they pursue multiple wars while currying favor and funds from upper 0.01% super-rich, financial and real estate moguls whose wealth has grown so dramatically during the crisis!
Conclusion
But there is a deep and quiet discomfort within the leading circles of the Obama regime: The “best and brightest” among his top officials are scampering to jump ship before the coming deluge: the Economic Guru Larry Summers, Rahm Emmanuel, Stuart Levey, Peter Orzag, Bob Gates, Tim Geithner and others, responsible for the disastrous wars, economic catastrophes, the gross concentration of wealth and the savaging of our living standards, have walked out or have announced their ‘retirement’, leaving it to the smiling con-men - President Obama and Vice-President ‘Joe’ Biden - and their ‘last and clueless loyalists’ to take the blame when the economy tanks and our social programs are wiped out. How else can we explain their less-than-courageous departures (to ‘spend more time with the family’) in the face of such a deepening crisis? The hasty retreat of these top officials is motivated by their desire to avoid political responsibility and to escape history’s indictment for their role in the impending economic debacle. They are eager to hide from a future judgment over which policy makers and leaders and what policies led to the destruction of the American middle and working classes with their good jobs, stable pensions, Social Security, decent health care and respected place in the world.
James Petras' New Book:
FROM THE PREFACE: The popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia have overthrown the public face of the imperial-backed dictatorships in the region, and inspired supporters of popular democracy worldwide.
Clarity Press 05.03.2011
As the Arab revolt spreads from North Africa to the Gulf and deepens its demands to include socio-economic as well as political demands, the Empire is striking back. The ruling military junta in Egypt has cracked down on the prodemocracy movement and looks to its autocratic “partners” in the Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula to drown the civil society movements in a blood bath.

While standing by the crumbling dictatorships elsewhere in the region, the United States, France and the United Kingdom raced to intervene when it seemed the revolt had spread to Libya. NATO was deployed, using the UN’s new “responsibility to protect” doctrine authorizing humanitarian intervention. Already NATO intervention has exceeded the UN mandate by bombing the Libyan capital and inflicting civilian casualties. Meanwhile, western governments openly pursue regime change in Libya while seeking to forestall it elsewhere.

These essays chronicle the growing militarization of US policy in North Africa and the Gulf and the historic confrontation between the Arab democratic revolution and the imperial backed satraps; between Libyans fighting for their independence and the Euro-American naval and air forces ravaging the country on behalf of their inept local clients.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ORDER

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction

Washington Faces the Arab Revolts: 
Sacrificing Dictators to Save the State

Egypt’s Social Movements, The CIA and Mossad

Roots of the Arab Revolts and Premature Celebrations

The Euro-US War on Libya

Official Lies and Misconceptions of Critics

Libya and Obama’s Defense of the ‘Rebel Uprising’

Contextualizing the ‘Arab Spring’:
Networks of Empire and Realignments of World Power

APPENDIX:
Indicators of Social Well Being in Pre-invasion Libya

AUTHOR

James Petras is a Bartle Professor (Emeritus) of Sociology at Binghamton University, New York. He is the author of 64 books published in 29 languages, and over 560 articles in professional journals, including the American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, Social Research, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Journal of Peasant Studies. He has published over 2000 articles in nonprofessional journals such as the New York Times, the Guardian, the Nation, Christian Science Monitor, Foreign Policy, New Left Review, Partisan Review, Temps Moderne, Le Monde Diplomatique, and his commentary is widely carried on the internet. His publishers have included Random House, John Wiley, Westview, Routledge, Macmillan, Verso, Zed Books and Pluto Books. He is winner of the Life Time Career Award, Marxist Section, of the American Sociology Association, the Robert Kenny Award for Best Book, 2002, and the Best Dissertation, Western Political Science Association in 1968.

Some recent titles include Unmasking Globalization: Imperialism of the Twenty-First Century (2001); co-author The Dynamics of Social Change in Latin America (2000), Unmasking Globalisation (2001), System in Crisis (2003), co-author Social Movements and State Power (2003), co-authorEmpire With Imperialism (2005), co-author) Multinationals on Trial (2006). His most recent titles are The Power of Israel in the United States and Rulers and Ruled in the United States, (acquired for Japanese, German, Italian, Indonesian, Czech and Arabic editions), Zionism, Militarism and the Decline of US Power, Global Depression & Regional Wars, and War Crimes in Gaza and the Zionist Fifth Column in America. He has a long history of commitment to social justice, working in particular with the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement for 11 years. In 1973-76 he was a member of the Bertrand Russell Tribunal on Repression in Latin America. He writes a monthly column for the Mexican newspaper, La Jornada, and previously, for the Spanish daily, El Mundo. He received his B.A. from Boston University and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.




The UN Is Aiding a Corporate Takeover of Drinking Water
By Scott Thill
AlterNet

Monday, Jul 4, 2011

Early last month, pharmaceutical titan Merck became the latest multinational to pledge allegiance to the CEO Water Mandate, the United Nations' public-private initiative "designed to assist companies in the development, implementation and disclosure of water sustainability policies and practices."

But there's darker data beneath that sunny marketing: The CEO Water Mandate has been heavily hammered by the Sierra Club, the Polaris Institute and more for exerting undemocratic corporate control over water resources (PDF) under the banner of the United Nations. It even won a Public Eye Award for flagrant greenwashing from the Swiss non-governmental organization Berne Declaration. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

"There is no admission of problems with the Water Mandate, or the United Nations Global Compact itself" -- the strategic policy initiative committed to human rights, labor and the environment -- Blue Gold and Blue Covenant author and activist Maude Barlow, who also chairs the National Council of Canadians and Food & Water Watch, explained to AlterNet. "These initiatives continue to flourish, not least because the most powerful member states of the United Nations are fully behind them. This also means that the United Nations is not funded fully. Programs and agencies often rely on private sponsorship to function, and are often barely getting their core administrative budgets funded."

Another major problem is that routinely compromised and controversial institutions like World Bank, International Monetary Fund and regional development banks in general are in control of the United Nations' biggest projects. In April, the World Bank assumed control of the United Nations Climate Conference's new $100 billion Green Fund, which is the opposite of a comforting proposition, considering the World Bank's repeatedly noxious financing of oil and coal projects.

"That gives control of billions of dollars to those who have been the most ardent promoters of water privatization," added Barlow, whose foreword for the Council of Canadians' recently damning report on private sector influence over the United Nations (PDF) argued that the planet is on the verge of a water crisis of terrifying proportions. "We're also seeing the IMF forcing indebted nations to sell off public assets, including water systems, as a condition of receiving financial support. The whole system is rigged for these corporations, and they still are losing contracts, not meeting their obligations and watching as remunicipalization moves forward in France and other core markets."

That kind of illogical corporate performance would logically lead to less control, not more. But the United Nations continues to hand over the reins to multinationals like its new cosigner Merck, which has repeatedly settled in court over everything from carcinogenic pollution to deceptive marketing. Despite the fact that the United Nations' own Joint Inspection Unit stated in a 2010 report (PDF) that the Global Compact's corporate partnerships were an unregulated mess.

"The lack of a clear and articulated mandate has resulted in blurred focus and impact," the report stated. "The absence of adequate entry criteria and an effective monitoring system to measure actual implementation of the principles by participants has drawn some criticism and reputational risk for the Organization, and the Office’s special set up has countered existing rules and procedures. Ten years after its creation, despite the intense activity carried out by the Office and the increasing resources received, results are mixed and risks unmitigated."

The report suggested that not only was a clearer mandate from Member States required to "rethink and refocus" the Compact's corporate partnerships, but that the United Nations' General Assembly must better direct the Secretary-General to delineate the Compact's overall functions "in order to prevent a situation whereby any external group or actor(s) may divert attention from the strategic goals agreed to promote interests which may damage the reputation of the United Nations." The short version? It's not working, and won't work in its current form for the foreseeable future.

But the United Nations' own advice to itself has evidently fallen mostly on deaf ears.

"Unfortunately, the United Nations appears to be embracing more and more partnerships with the corporate sector across the board," Corporate Accountability International campaign director Gigi Kellett told AlterNet. "Civil society has been raising concerns about this flawed approach for over 10 years. There are strong voices within the United Nations, including some Member states, who are questioning the partnership paradigm adopted by the UN and calling for more transparency and accountability."

But they are voices in the wilderness without the concerted support of a motivated public, as well as the usual civil society champions who make stopping this strain of corporate abuse their life's work. Power truly respects only one thing, and that is equally exercised power. And the public is fully empowered to make all the change it wants, provided it can unplug itself from distracting sex scandals and mainstream media marketing primarily designed to nurture its collective complacency.

"Corporations rely on people's tacit support and willingness to look the other way when they engage in conduct that harms people or the environment and undermines democratic governance and decision-making," Kellett said. "When people come together in coordinated fashion and withhold their support from a corporation, that relationship is turned on its head. Boycotts are one powerful way that individuals can withhold their support, but there are range of other strategies. When activists come together and raise questions about a corporation's actions and tie them to its brand and image, the resulting media exposure can greatly impact how the corporation is perceived by consumers, investors or even government regulators."

But how do you boycott a multinational that controls your water supply? Can you shame a mammoth corporation into abdicating control over a lucrative commodity that should instead be regarded as a universal human right? Talk about your Sisyphean tasks.

"Boycotts are much more difficult with water than a product like Coke," said Barlow. "There are no substitutes for water, and when these corporations are given monopoly power over water systems, boycotts are very unrealistic. Suez, Veolia and others are very concerned about their corporate image, but there is no effective means to hurt them financially except to end or block the contracts before they are signed. Boycotts have been very effective as public awareness campaigns, but citizens need to apply pressure on their governments as the first step in stopping the proliferation of voluntary initiatives."

Demanding regulation of the private sector's products -- from water and natural resource commodification to inscrutable financial instruments and beyond -- as well as the public's political electives appears to be the paramount first principle. Because the problem is getting worse and going nowhere, especially now that our dystopian climate crisis has permanently disrupted business, and existence, as usual. From escalating warming and extreme weather to destabilized nations and environments, Earth is already precariously balanced on the tipping point. And giving profit-minded corporations voluntary control over their power and procedures is a 20th century anachronism best left behind.

"We have not proven to have what it takes to deal with the climate crisis," argued Barlow, "and this is because it is all seen as a giant political and financial game, rather than the best and only chance to head off a catastrophe like we have never before imagined. Climate change is upon us, but we will never admit it fully, nor invest in stopping it, if our governments continue to represent corporate interests above others. It is up to us to challenge our states, and make sure they know we are engaged and aware."

Scott Thill runs the online mag Morphizm.com. His writing has appeared on Salon, XLR8R, All Music Guide, Wired and others.

Someone's coming to get me': Terrified phone-hacking whistleblower
feared for his life before he was found dead

Sean Hoare found dead at his flat in Watford, Herts
Ex NotW reporter's claims last autumn reignited scandal
Mr Hoare claimed Coulson's denials of phone hacking were 'a lie'
Police probing former showbiz reporter's 'suicide'
Friends suggest he may have died of natural causes
Post mortem being carried out this morning

By Sam Greenhill, Tom Kelly and James Chapman

Last updated at 12:54 PM on 19th July 2011

Mr Hoare in the sitting room of his home. A friend and neighbour
claimed Mr Hoare had become increasingly reclusive and paranoid in
recent weeks

Evidence: The death of Mr Hoare is currently being treated as
unexplained, said authorities

Guarded: Two police officers stand outside Mr Hoare's flat


"Last year Mr Hoare (right) claimed that Andy Coulson was aware of
phone hacking while he was editor at the News of the World.

He gave an interview to the New York Times, and then to the BBC, about
the use of phone hacking at the newspaper.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4's PM programme, he said phone hacking was
'endemic' in the newspaper industry.

Mr Hoare, who worked on the Sun before being recruited by Mr Coulson
to work on the NOTW, said: 'He was well aware that the practice
exists. To deny it is a lie, simply a lie.'

Mr Coulson denies the allegations.

Later, Mr Hoare was interviewed by police over the allegations he had
made but would offer no comment, Director of Public Prosecutions Keir
Starmer said in December."


Tragic: Police are investigating the death of Mr Hoare after his body
was found at his Hertfordshire home

Investigation: Forensic officers and a policeman at the flat of Mr Hoare

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ news/article-2016132/Sean- Hoare-News-World-phone- hacking-whistleblower-dead. html#ixzz1SYTMFKfu


Allegations: Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson was aware
phone hacking took place at the paper, Mr Hoare claimed last year

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ news/article-2016132/Sean- Hoare-News-World-phone- hacking-whistleblower-dead. html#ixzz1SYSsSk5x



The man who launched the entire phone hacking scandal had become a
paranoid recluse who believed someone was out to get him, a friend has
revealed.

Sean Hoare, who was found dead at his flat in Watford, Hertfordshire,
yesterday, had spent much of the last weeks of his life 'hiding' in
his flat with the curtains drawn.

Last night a friend and neighbour claimed Mr Hoare, 47, had become
increasingly reclusive and paranoid in recent weeks.

‘He would talk about someone from the Government coming to get him,' he said.

'He’d say to me, “If anyone comes by, don’t say I’m in”.

'He was physically going downhill. He was yellow in colour and wasn’t
looking well for the last month.

‘He had a constant struggle with alcohol and talked to me about how
much he had put his wife through.

‘He did say something about phone hacking and I think that was his
main worry. He had definite concerns with the media. He did mention he
was paranoid and would mention conspiracy stuff.’

Former News of the World journalist Mr Hoare had accused former Tory
media chief Andy Coulson of lying about his role in the affair.

He said that when editor of the paper, Mr Coulson actively encouraged
his staff to intercept the calls of celebrities.

It was his explosive claims last autumn that reignited the scandal and
ultimately led to the tumultuous events of the past fortnight which
have shaken the political, police and media establishments.

Police were investigating the possibility that he had killed himself,
saying his death was ‘not thought to be suspicious’.

His death came on a day when:

The Metropolitan Police was left in turmoil as counter-terrorism
officer John Yates was forced to follow Commissioner Sir Paul
Stephenson and resign;
Mr Yates faced investigation over claims that he secured a
Scotland Yard job for the daughter of hacking suspect Neil Wallis;
David Cameron cut short a trip to Africa and said he will fly back
to Britain today after agreeing to delay Parliament’s summer break to
discuss the affair;
London Mayor Boris Johnson infuriated Number Ten by refusing to
say whether the PM should quit over his hiring of Mr Coulson;
Police recovered a bag containing a computer, phone and paperwork
found in a bin near Rebekah Brooks’s London home.
The body of Mr Hoare, 47, was discovered by police yesterday morning
at his modern first-floor flat in Watford.

The former reporter blew the whistle during an investigation by the
New York Times last September, pointing the finger directly at Mr
Coulson, by then the Prime Minister’s communications chief.

Until Mr Hoare spoke out in September, pressure had eased on Mr
Coulson, recruited by David Cameron as his media chief in 2007 after
resigning as editor of the News of the World when royal reporter Clive
Goodman and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire were jailed.

Last week, Mr Hoare was back in the spotlight with further claims,
telling the New York Times that reporters at the News of the World
were able to use police technology to locate people using their mobile
phone signals in exchange for payments to police officers.

Mr Coulson, who quit Downing Street in January and was arrested over
hacking earlier this month, has strenuously denied Mr Hoare’s
allegations.
He issued a statement last year that he had ‘never condoned the use of
phone hacking and nor do I have any recollection of incidences where
phone hacking took place’.

But Mr Hoare told Radio 4’s PM programme that phone hacking was
‘endemic’ at the newspaper and said of his former boss: ‘He was well
aware that the practice exists. To deny it is a lie, simply a lie.’

Mr Hoare’s death remained unexplained last night.

Police could not rule out suicide but friends suggested natural causes
was also a possibility as he had been suffering from ill health.

A post-mortem examination was taking place this morning as police
continued to investigate the death.

A Hertfordshire Police spokeswoman added: 'The man's next of kin have
been informed and the family are being supported by police at this sad
time.'

Officers have yet to confirm arrangements for an inquest to be opened.

His solicitor David Sonn said: ‘I last spoke to him a week ago and he
seemed fine. I am shocked and saddened. It is a terrible tragedy.’

He added: ‘In giving his statement to the New York Times, he was
arguably the catalyst for everything that has happened since.’  When
Mr Coulson was made editor of the News of the World in 2003, he
recruited Mr Hoare as a showbusiness reporter.
They had previously both worked on The Sun’s showbusiness column Bizarre.

One former colleague said: ‘At The Sun, they were absolutely the best
of buddies. They used to go out to Covent Garden and socialise all
night together. Andy would cover for Sean, or vice versa, if one of
them was too hung over for work.

‘I last saw Sean at a do not all that long after he left the News of
the World. He was looking very scrubbed and sober and I asked what he
planned to do, and he said he wanted to get back into journalism but
added, “Journalism has turned its back on me”.’

Mr Hoare was sacked from the News of the World over drink and drug
problems in 2005, and last year sources at the paper said that his
claims should be treated with ‘extreme scepticism’.

But a friend who saw him more recently described him as ‘sober’ and
wanting to rebuild his career.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ news/article-2016132/Sean- Hoare-News-World-phone- hacking-whistleblower-dead. html#ixzz1SYTGoBXD


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Restoring Courage Israel Rally Moving Because Of Assassination Fears

Glenn Beck ,   Video , Restoring Courage , Glenn Beck Israel Rally ,
Glenn Beck Program , Glenn Beck Restoring Courage , Restoring Courage
Temple Mount , Temple Mount , Media News

Glenn Beck announced Monday that his "Restoring Courage" rally will
have to move locations because he fears than an assassination attempt
may take place if he hold the rally at the Temple Mount, as he
originally intended.

The Temple Mount is one of the holiest and most heavily contested
religious sites in the world. Beck said on his Monday show that his
security team informed him that holding a polarizing rally at the site
might not be the best idea. He said that, because of some of the
as-yet-to-be-announced guests who are planning to attend the rally,
"some of the security services were getting a little nervous."

Beck brought up the assassination of former Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin, and said that he did not want to risk having anyone
killed at his rally.

"Courage must be coupled with wisdom, and the last thing we want to
happen is for anyone to be injured in any way, or there to be any kind
of conflict," he said.

The rally is taking place August 24th in Jerusalem.

r-GLENN-BECK-Restoring_Courage_Israel Rally_Moving_Because_Of_Assassination_Fears.jpg GLENN-BECK-Restoring_Courage_Israel Rally_Moving_Because_Of_Assassination_Fears 


Mass psychosis in the US
How Big Pharma got Americans 
hooked on anti-psychotic drugs.

James Ridgeway Last Modified: 12 Jul 2011 06:20

Drug companies like Pfizer are accused of pressuring doctors into
over-prescribing medications to patients in order to increase profits

"The use of psychoactive drugs - including both antidepressants and
antipsychotics - has exploded...[yet] 'the tally of those who are
disabled...increased nearly two and a half times."

Marcia Angell, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine

Has America become a nation of psychotics? You would certainly think
so, based on the explosion in the use of antipsychotic medications. In
2008, with over $14 billion in sales, antipsychotics became the single
top-selling therapeutic class of prescription drugs in the United
States, surpassing drugs used to treat high cholesterol and acid
reflux.

Once upon a time, antipsychotics were reserved for a relatively small
number of patients with hard-core psychiatric diagnoses - primarily
schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - to treat such symptoms as
delusions, hallucinations, or formal thought disorder. Today, it
seems, everyone is taking antipsychotics. Parents are told that their
unruly kids are in fact bipolar, and in need of anti-psychotics, while
old people with dementia are dosed, in large numbers, with drugs once
reserved largely for schizophrenics. Americans with symptoms ranging
from chronic depression to anxiety to insomnia are now being
prescribed anti-psychotics at rates that seem to indicate a national
mass psychosis.

It is anything but a coincidence that the explosion in antipsychotic
use coincides with the pharmaceutical industry's development of a new
class of medications known as "atypical antipsychotics." Beginning
with Zyprexa, Risperdal, and Seroquel in the 1990s, followed by
Abilify in the early 2000s, these drugs were touted as being more
effective than older antipsychotics like Haldol and Thorazine. More
importantly, they lacked the most noxious side effects of the older
drugs - in particular, the tremors and other motor control problems.

The atypical anti-psychotics were the bright new stars in the
pharmaceutical industry's roster of psychotropic drugs - costly,
patented medications that made people feel and behave better without
any shaking or drooling. Sales grew steadily, until by 2009 Seroquel
and Abilify numbered fifth and sixth in annual drug sales, and
prescriptions written for the top three atypical antipsychotics
totaled more than 20 million.  Suddenly, antipsychotics weren't just
for psychotics any more.

Not just for psychotics anymore

By now,


Who or what organisation and/or group was behind the murder and coverup of the murder of whistleblower on illegal phone hacking by police and other people working for the London Met Police and other reporters in the News Media, illegal blinging by members of the London Met Police and police bribery Sean Hoare who was about to tell his full story through providing

 evidence to the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 


the-murdoch-empire-the-short-answer-is-no-2317226.htm

Martin Hickman: Was Sean Hoare killed by the Murdoch empire?

 The short answer is no

The who organised the murder and cover up of the murder of Sean Hoare?
Who had most to lose if Sean Hoare had lived to tell his story in a court of law, judicial inquiry and/or in front of the parliamentary select committee on the 19th July 2011?
Answer: The London Metropolitan Police

Who has the best ability to cover up the murder of Sean Hoare?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

Who has the best ability and resources and has access to MI5 and MI6resources as well to use to murder Sean Hoare?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

Who is in charge of the investigation of the murder of Sean Hoare?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

Who is mostly to blame in the Murdoch-News of the world phone hacking, blinging, police bribery etc scandal?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

How many London Met Police Officers have been charged for bribery and the illegal use of police information and resources?

Answer: None

Who do the London Met Police think that  the public going to point the finger at for the murder of Sean Hoare?

Answer? The Murdoch Gang

What were the new serious statements that Sean Hoare were making to New York Times Reporters in recent days that would want some one or some group to murder Sean Hoaare in a rather hurry before he was called to the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 that would have blow the lid of this affair right open?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police involvement with the news staff at the News of the World in using police sources and technology to find where someone was buy using police computers and other police technology to locate a person's whereabouts by through their mobile phone for a fee of £300 a time. Sean Hoare was starting to make statements to international reporters about the endemic practice and involvement of the London Met Police in this practice known as blinging in the news trade. Yes the London Met Police had to immediately silence Sean Hoare and make sure he could not attend the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 to give evidence for the whole world to see on line about his knowledge of this practice of blinging that members of the London Metropolitan Police had been doing for years for a fee of £300 a time. There is no doubt that the most senior members of the London Metropolitan Police including the one that has just resigned Sir Paul Stephenson, simply had to call in a favour of MI5 and M16 to have Sean Hoare quietly murdered using a new drug they have that can cause a heart attack and can not be detected after death in the body and can be placed in a glass of water without the person drinking it being able to detect that it has been put into the water as it has no taste and no colour. This is what was used to murder the famous millionaire businessman Laurie Connel on Western  Australia when he threatened to expose many of the most powerful  people in Australian politics and business circles if he went to jail over fraud charges he was defending in court at the time of his death when he collapsed during his trial where he was defending himself because he realised all his lawyers were corrupt and could not be trusted and decided the only way to try and obtain a fair hearing was to represent himself and expose all the powerful people he was the Bag Man for all their millions in cash money transactions for many years in Australia. Those that Laurie Connel could expose, just like the London Metropolitan Police could not allow Sean Hoare to be alive on the morning of the 19th July, 2011 to give evidence to the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 , simply could not allow Laurie Connel ( known as the Lender of the Last Resort) to live and tell his story...to the court and expose all those powerful people...






20th July 2011

Sean Hoare looks likely to take his place behind Princess Diana and David Kelly in the roll call of controversial deaths. Within hours of reports of his untimely demise, conspiracy theorists were questioning whether he had been murdered.
"Another murder cover-up?" asked one online. Another wrote: "Nothing that the British police can say will convince me that Sean Hoare's death was natural causes."
The decision of many newspapers, but not The Independent, to splash on the sensational death of the "phone-hacking whistleblower" posed the question in some readers' minds: was this man killed by the Murdoch empire? The answer is – unexcitedly but almost certainly – "no".
True, we do not yet have all the facts, but there are many reasons why Mr Hoare's death presents no more of a conspiracy than the failure of Princess Diana to fasten her seatbelt while being driven through the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris in 1997.
Firstly, Mr Hoare was not in possession of unique information about the wrongdoing at the News of the World, nor was he the only one to point the finger at Andy Coulson, its former editor. During its excellent investigation into the "hack attack" last year, The New York Times spoke to 12 current or former NOTW staff, who said hacking was rife.
Secondly, the new inquiry into phone hacking, Operation Weeting, was always unlikely to base its case on the testimony of one ex-employee. While statements may form part of its case, a much bigger part will rely on emails discovered or forensically recovered from News International's digital archive, electronic payment invoices and phone records.
Even if Weeting were to make personal testimony central, it was unlikely to have been Mr Hoare's, since he had been dismissed from the NOTW for drink and drug problems and could be portrayed as an unreliable witness.
Thirdly, the (unspoken but tangible) suggestion that News International might want to send death squads scuttling round Britain to silence witnesses is absurd, and especially so given the trouble it already faces.
Notwithstanding its dark arts, deceit and links to criminals, NI's new strategy is PR-led; it wants to now co-operate with the police and apologise for the mess.
Fourthly, Mr Hoare's death is not being investigated by the Metropolitan Police but by the Hertfordshire force, whose statement that the death was not thought to be suspicious was probably a disappointment to Hertfordshire's best detectives, who may have been only too keen to get one over on their big city colleagues.
Finally, Mr Hoare was not in good health. He was reported to be looking yellow and his doctor had remarked that he should have been dead.
And this is where Mr Hoare almost certainly was a "victim" of News International. He was told to do whatever it took to get the story; he went on marathon benders and snorted coke with rock stars. He had some great times as a show business journalist. But he decided to tell the truth about the illegal methods used to land stories. In that he was brave, and that is what he should be remembered for, not the manner of his passing.

The decision of many newspapers, but not The Independent, to splash on the sensational death of the "phone-hacking whistleblower" posed the question in some readers' minds: was this man killed by the Murdoch empire? The answer is – unexcitedly but almost certainly – "no".
True, we do not yet have all the facts, but there are many reasons why Mr Hoare's death presents no more of a conspiracy than the failure of Princess Diana to fasten her seatbelt while being driven through the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris in 1997.
Firstly, Mr Hoare was not in possession of unique information about the wrongdoing at the News of the World, nor was he the only one to point the finger at Andy Coulson, its former editor. During its excellent investigation into the "hack attack" last year, The New York Times spoke to 12 current or former NOTW staff, who said hacking was rife.
Secondly, the new inquiry into phone hacking, Operation Weeting, was always unlikely to base its case on the testimony of one ex-employee. While statements may form part of its case, a much bigger part will rely on emails discovered or forensically recovered from News International's digital archive, electronic payment invoices and phone records.
Even if Weeting were to make personal testimony central, it was unlikely to have been Mr Hoare's, since he had been dismissed from the NOTW for drink and drug problems and could be portrayed as an unreliable witness.
Thirdly, the (unspoken but tangible) suggestion that News International might want to send death squads scuttling round Britain to silence witnesses is absurd, and especially so given the trouble it already faces.
Notwithstanding its dark arts, deceit and links to criminals, NI's new strategy is PR-led; it wants to now co-operate with the police and apologise for the mess.
Fourthly, Mr Hoare's death is not being investigated by the Metropolitan Police but by the Hertfordshire force, whose statement that the death was not thought to be suspicious was probably a disappointment to Hertfordshire's best detectives, who may have been only too keen to get one over on their big city colleagues.
Finally, Mr Hoare was not in good health. He was reported to be looking yellow and his doctor had remarked that he should have been dead.
And this is where Mr Hoare almost certainly was a "victim" of News International. He was told to do whatever it took to get the story; he went on marathon benders and snorted coke with rock stars. He had some great times as a show business journalist. But he decided to tell the truth about the illegal methods used to land stories. In that he was brave, and that is what he should be remembered for, not the manner of his passing.


Head of Met press admits they employ 10 ex News of the World journalists

by James Lyons, Daily Mirror 20/07/2011
THE Met Police’s communications boss yesterday admitted 10 out of 45 press office staff used to work at the News of the World.
Dick Fedorcio also told the Select Committee he never asked former NoW deputy editor Neil Wallis about phone hacking before taking him on as a consultant. He instead claimed assistant commissioner John Yates, a friend of Mr Wallis, undertook a process of due ­diligence in vetting him.
But when quizzed by MPs, Mr Yates said this was “over-egging the pudding” and the tendering process was ultimately down to Mr Fedorcio. Asked if he would have appointed Mr Wallis in hindsight, Mr Fedorcio said: “Certainly not”, adding he could not remember who suggested Mr Wallis for the job but denied it was then-News International chief Rebekah Brooks.
Mr Fedorcio also said he was “dismayed” at reports he favoured the NoW when placing stories, even though almost a quarter of his staff were ex-employees. The Met has referred his dealings with Mr Wallis to the ­Independent Police Complaints Commission.
Meanwhile, former Met chief Sir Paul Stephenson yesterday said he resigned to prevent continuing damaging speculation over his role in the scandal in the run-up to the London Olympics.


Read more: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2011/07/20/head-of-met-press-admits-they-employ-10-ex-news-of-the-world-journalists-115875-23283025/#ixzz1Scyn6AAr 
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Media

UK news

Rebekah Brooks faces MPs

Former NI chief's evidence to the Commons culture, media and sport committee as it happened
Rebekah Brooks giving evidence to the Home Affairs Select Committee

1568 comments


Murdoch: I knew nothing about hacking

News Corp chief gives hesitant performance in front of MPs, but son admits firm contributed to private investigator's legal fees. By John Plunkett

Rupert Murdoch


Brooks: hacking payments not my remit

Rebekah Brooks gives evidence on phone hacking
Former News International chief says News of the World's managing editor approved payments to private detectives. By John Plunkett

NoW whistleblower found dead

Sean Hoare
Death of Sean Hoare – who was first named journalist to allege Andy Coulson knew of hacking – not being treated as suspicious

News Corp faces bribery investigation

Eric Holder
Pressure mounting in US for a full-scale inquiry into News Corporation under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

james murdochBoard meeting will also consider whether to pay special dividend to investors or buy own shares to boost price




News International

James and Rupert Murdoch
All-party home affairs committee report into phone hacking to be published in time for David Cameron's statement





Politics

A protester lunges at James Murdoch before being apprehended by securityJonathan May-Bowles, 26, of Edinburgh Gardens, Windsor, was bailed to appear before City of Westminster Magistrates Court on Friday






Tycoon expresses regret for News Corporation's involvement in scandal but insists he was kept in dark
Phone hacking claims



Wendi Deng defends Rupert Murdoch from attacker – video

Video (30 sec) A protester lunges towards James and Rupert Murdoch as they give evidence on phone hacking to MPs

News Corp management 'misled by very bad people at a very low level'

19 Jul 2011, 9:35 BST:
How the US papers are previewing today's Commons appearance by the Murdochs. By Roy Greenslade

Select committee report: the verdicts

 The Houses of Parliament landmark lights are pictured turned off during the Capital 95.8 Lights Out London Campaign on June 21, 2007 in London, England
Feb 2010: What the culture, media and sport select committee report said about Coulson, the information commissioner, police and PCC

Interactive timeline

James Murdoch: Brooks' standards of ethics are 'very good' - video
What was happening and what News International, the police, politicians and others were saying





Rupert Murdoch had hoped to begin by reading out a statement of apology, but the first question went to James

Toxicology tests awaited as police rule out any third-party involvement in death of News of the World whistleblower



Ex-NoW executive was advising on how best to get coverage in tabloid newspapers on a 'specific' policy basis

The News International team tell Commons committee they were as shocked as everyone by the Milly Dowler revelations

Rupert Murdoch and son James let some moral blame through but had to repel anything resembling criminal responsibility

Rupert Murdoch's shaving-cream assailant first faced a slap, and then had his pie thrown back at him





Met admits only warning 36 people

John Yates
April 2011: Disclosure of formerly secret number exposes Met to complaint it breached agreement to warn potential victims


How the Guardian broke the story

Les Hinton, Rupert Murdoch, Andy Coulson and Rebekah Wade
News of the World bugging led to £700,000 payout to PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor
291 comments


Rebekah should have gone ages ago

15 Jul 2011, 10:38 BST


More questions for the News Int trio

17 Jul 2011, 13:07 BST


Q&A with Alan Rusbridger

The Guardian's editor debated issues arising from the phone-hacking scandal with readers
453 comments

Phone-hacking: Neil Wallis 'advised' Andy Coulson before election

Conservative party sources say advice had nothing to do with phone-hacking inquiry



News of the World phone-hacking whistleblower found dead

Death of Sean Hoare – who was first named journalist to allege Andy Coulson knew of hacking – not being treated as suspicious

Sean Hoare
Hoare first made his claims in a New York Times investigation into the phone-hacking allegations at the News of the World. Photograph: Hazel Thompson/Eyevine
Sean Hoare, the former News of the World showbusiness reporter who was the first named journalist to allege that Andy Coulson was aware of phone hacking by his staff, has been found dead .
Hoare, who worked on the Sun and the News of the World with Coulson before being dismissed for drink and drugs problems, was said to have been found at his Watford home.
Hertfordshire police would not confirm his identity, but said in a statement: "At 10.40am today [Monday 18 July] police were called to Langley Road, Watford, following the concerns for the welfare of a man who lives at an address on the street. Upon police and ambulance arrival at a property, the body of a man was found. The man was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after.
"The death is currently being treated as unexplained but not thought to be suspicious. Police investigations into this incident are ongoing."
There was an unexplained delay in the arrival of forensics officers at the scene.
Neighbours said three police cars and two ambulances arrived at the property shortly before 11am. They left around four hours later, around 3pm, shortly after a man and a woman, believed to be grieving relatives, arrived at the premises. There was no police presence at the scene at all for several hours.
The curtains were drawn at the first-floor apartment in a new-build block of flats.
At about 9.15pm, three hours after the Guardian revealed Hoare had been found dead a police van marked "Scientific Services Unit" pulled up at the address, where a police car was already parked. Two officers emerged carrying evidence bags, clipboards, torches and laptop-style bags and entered the building. Three officers carrying cameras and wearing white forensic suits went into the flat at around 9.30pm.
Hoare was in his mid-40s. He first made his claims in a New York Times investigation into the phone-hacking allegations  at the News of the World. He told the newspaper that not only did Coulson know of the hacking, but he also actively encouraged his staff to intercept the calls of celebrities in the pursuit of exclusives.
In a subsequent interview with the BBC he alleged he was personally asked by his editor at the time, Coulson, to tap into phones. In an interview with the PM programme he said Coulson's insistence he did not know of the practice was "a lie, it is simply a lie". At the time a Downing Street spokeswoman said Coulson totally and utterly denied the allegations; he had "never condoned the use of phone hacking and nor do I have any recollection of incidences where hacking took place".
Hoare said he was once a close friend of Coulson's, and told the New York Times the two first worked together at the Sun, where, Hoare said, he played recordings of hacked messages for Coulson. At the News of the World, Hoare said, he continued to inform Coulson of his activities. He "actively encouraged me to do it", Hoare said. In September last year he was interviewed under caution by police over his claim the former Tory communications chief asked him to hack into phones when editor of the paper, but declined to make any comment.
Hoare returned to the spotlight last week, after he told the New York Times that reporters at the NoW were able to use police technology to locate people using their mobile phone signals, in exchange for payments to police officers. He said journalists were able to use "pinging", which measured the distance between a mobile handset and a number of phone masts to pinpoint its location.
Hoare gave further details about "pinging" to the Guardian last week. He described how reporters would ask a news desk executive to obtain the location of a target: "Within 15 to 30 minutes someone on the news desk would come back and say 'Right, that's where they are.'"
He said: "You'd just go to the news desk and they'd come back to you. You don't ask any questions. You'd consider it a job done.
"The chain of command is one of absolute discipline, and that's why I never bought into it, like with Andy saying he wasn't aware of it and all that. That's bollocks."
He said he stood by everything he told the New York Times of "pinging". "I don't know how often it happened. That would be wrong of me. But if I had access, as a humble reporter … "
He admitted he had had problems with drink and drugs, and had been in rehab. "But that's irrelevant," he said. "There's more to come. This is not going to go away."
Hoare named a private investigator who he said had links with the News of the World, adding: "He may want to talk now, because I think what you'll find now is a lot of people are going to want to cover their arse." Speaking to another Guardian journalist last week, Hoare repeatedly expressed the hope that the hacking scandal would lead to journalism in general being cleaned up, and said he had decided to blow the whistle on the activities of some of his former NoW colleagues with that aim in mind.
He also said he had been injured the previous weekend while taking down a marquee erected for a children's party. He said he broke his nose and badly injured his foot when a relative accidentally struck him with a pole from the marquee. Hoare also emphasised that he was not making any money from telling his story.
Having been treated for drug and alcohol problems, Hoare reminisced about his partying with former pop stars and said that he missed the days when he was able to go out on the town.
On Monday evening the curtains were drawn at his home, a first-floor apartment in a new-build block of flats.
A neighbour living opposite, Nicky Dormer, said three police cars and two ambulances arrived at the property at 11am; police left at 3pm, shortly after a man and a woman, believed to be grieving relatives, arrived at the premises.
She and another neighbour described Hoare as a jovial man who would often sit on his balcony, overlooking the block entrance, and talk to residents. They said he lived in the block with his partner, a woman called Jo, who they believed had been away on holiday. Neither had seen Hoare for a few days.
Paul Pritchard, 30, another neighbour, said Sean Hoare was "the most sociable" resident, and they would regularly see him watering the communal front lawn.
"It is just such a shock. About a month ago he said he felt unwell and he said he went to the doctors for a checkup. Then I saw him again and he seemed well."
Sean Hoare
Detectives seek to discover preliminary cause of death of former News of the World journalist who spoke out about Andy Coulson. By Paul Lewis

Sean Hoare
Detectives seek to discover preliminary cause of death of former News of the World journalist who spoke out about Andy Coulson. By Paul Lewis


Sean Hoare death: postmortem being held on hacking whistleblower

Detectives seek to discover preliminary cause of death of former News of the World journalist who spoke out about Andy Coulson
Home of Sean Hoare, former reporter for the News of the World,
The Watford home of Sean Hoare, the former reporter for the News of the World who has been found dead. Photograph: Jonathan Hordle/Rex Features

A postmortem on the body of Sean Hoare, the News of the Worldwhistleblower found dead on Monday, is expected to provide a preliminary cause of death.
Police are treating the death of Hoare, 47, as "unexplained but not thought to be suspicious". Hoare was the first named journalist to allege that Andy Coulson, the former News of the World editor, was aware of phone hacking by his staff.
Hoare worked for the Sun and NoW with Coulson before being dismissed for drink and drugs problems, and had spoken openly to a number of news organisations about the practice of phone hacking.
Detectives from Hertfordshire police's major crimes unit are running the investigation because of the high profile of Hoare's death.
They are understood to be awaiting the outcome of the postmortem, due to begin at 2pm on Tuesday, while seeking to establish the last time he was seen alive.
The force said in a statement: "Police investigations continue into the unexplained death of a man who, whilst formal identification is yet to take place, police believe to be Sean Hoare. The postmortem is set to take place today [Tuesday]. The man's next of kin have been informed and the family are being supported by police at this sad time."
The former tabloid journalist is understood to have lived at the first floor flat in Watford with his partner, Jo. Hoare's body was found in the flat at 10.40am on Monday. Neighbours described seeing police and ambulance at the scene until about 3pm.
It was not until after 9pm, two hours after news broke that the phone-hacking whistleblower had been found dead, that more uniformed and plainclothes police arrived at the scene. At about 9.15pm, a police van marked Scientific Services Unit pulled up at the address, where a police car was already parked.
Two officers emerged carrying evidence bags, clipboards, torches and laptop-style bags and entered the building. Three officers carrying cameras and in white forensic suits followed at 9.30pm.
Police sources said that it was "not unusual" for a forensics team to investigate the scene of an unexplained death. The former showbusiness reporter struggled with drug and alcohol problems, and is known to have been unwell in recent weeks.
Hoare returned to the spotlight last Tuesday, after he told the New York Times that reporters at the NoW were able to use police technology to locate people using their mobile phone signals, in exchange for payments to police officers. He said journalists were able to purchase the mobile phone tracking data from police for just £300.
That evening he had dinner with two New York Times journalist involved in the story, Don Van Natta Jr and Jo Becker. Van Natta Jr tweeted on Monday night: "RIP Sean Hoare. Jo Becker and I had dinner with him last Tues night. He was ailing but defiant and funny. And no regrets. All-courage."
Hoare gave further details about so-called "pinging" to Guardian journalists on Tuesday and Wednesday. He described how reporters would ask a newsdesk executive to obtain the location of a target. He said: "Within 15 to 30 minutes someone on the newsdesk would come back and say 'Right, that's where they are.' "
He added: "You'd just go to the newsdesk and they'd come back to you. You don't ask any questions. You'd consider it a job done."
Hoare repeatedly expressed the hope that the hacking scandal would lead to journalism in general being cleaned up, and said he had decided to blow the whistle on the activities of some of his former NoW colleagues with that aim in mind.
Repeated calls to Hoare's home telephone number on Thursday and Friday went unanswered.
Sean Hoare
Colleagues pay tribute after death of former News of the World entertainment correspondent who spoke out on phone hacking. By Hannah Godfrey


Sean Hoare: journalists remember 'old fashioned Fleet Street character'

Colleagues pay tribute after death of former News of the World entertainment correspondent who spoke out on phone hacking
Sean Hoare
Sean Hoare, a tabloid reporter who worked at the Sun and the People as well as the News of the World, in his sitting room at home. Photograph: Hazel Thompson /eyevine
Former colleagues have been paying tribute to Sean Hoare, the formerNews of the World entertainment correspondent who was found dead at his Watford home on Monday.
David Yelland, who edited the Sun from 1998 to 2003, used Twitter to say: "Sean Hoare was trying to be honest, struggling with addiction. But he was a good man. My God."
Ben Proctor, who worked with Hoare over many years and was most recently deputy editor of the People, recalled him fondly as "an old fashioned Fleet Street character".
"Typically with Sean he managed to became close to Liam Gallagher. Liam even helped Sean's fledgling freelance career when the News of the World cut him adrift, offering to assist him with background info on a book about Oasis," he said.
Proctor told the Guardian that Hoare was "imbued with an incredible earthy charm", as well as being a great reporter.
"Like a cross between Arthur Daley and Del Trotter, you could always rely on Sean to persuade people to part with the facts."
Hoare, said Proctor, was a journalist of traditional vintage: "An old fashioned Fleet Street character, always in the pub but always with a story."
Though the most of the tributes were warm, Proctor portrayed a man with some hard edges:
"When I first met him he offered to break my knee caps over some 'creative differences'. But another time, when word went round I had a problem, he was first to my home to lend support. I always loved him, everybody did."
Others who worked alongside Hoare recounted fond memories from when they were young and green.
They included the Guardian's columnist Marina Hyde, who worked as a secretary at the Sun, and wrote on Twitter: "Utterly tragic news about my friend Sean Hoare, the first journalist to speak to me when I started as a secretary ... He continued to be kind to me until the very end, and he was more special than I can possibly say."
Simon Ricketts, a Guardian journalist, recalled on Twitter that Hoare was "a lovely generous man" who took him under his wing as a work experience reporter on a local paper: "He handed me a story on a plate. I went out to investigate, got all my notes and got back to the office and started to write it."
"I finished and Sean had a look. He got my notebook, extracted the best quotes, the one's I'd left in the notebook. He tickled, edited and expanded my story.
"By the time he'd finished, it was 100 times better. It got put on the front page of the paper. Sean insisted that my name go on the story. When the paper came out, he walked over with a copy. He gave me it with a flourish. "Congratulations on your first-ever splash," he said."
Ricketts concludes, "I shall raise a glass or 12 tonight to him."

PA journalist arrested over phone hacking faces no further action

Laura Elston, a royal reporter for the Press Association, dropped from inquiry after police speak to Clarence House
Paddy Harverson
According to reports, Laura Elston was arrested on suspicion of hacking the voicemails of Paddy Harverson, pictured, Prince Charles's spokesman. Clarence House reportedly told police she was innocent. Photograph: John Peters/PA

A journalist arrested by police investigating phone hacking at the News of the World faces no further action, her lawyer said on Monday.
Laura Elston, 34, who works for the Press Association news agency, was held for several hours on 27 June when she voluntarily went to a central London police station.
Her solicitor, David Corker, said he had been told she faced no further action: "She has been dropped from the inquiry."
Scotland Yard confirmed a 34-year-old arrested in June had had her bail cancelled and been told she faced no further action.
Elston had been questioned on suspicion of intercepting communications, contrary to section 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, and was the only journalist arrested so far with no known News International links.
Elston works as a royal correspondent and was originally released on police bail until October. She joined the organisation as a graduate trainee in 2000.
PA editor Jonathan Grun said: "Laura Elston is a journalist of integrity who has had a distinguished career since joining us as a trainee more than a decade ago. We are pleased that this matter has been cleared up."
She was interviewed by detectives on Operation Weeting, the investigation launched by the Metropolitan police in January following new allegations of phone hacking.
According to the Sunday Mirror, Elston was arrested on suspicion of hacking the voicemails of Prince Charles's spokesman Paddy Harverson.
The allegation related to Elston's phone being used to call Harverson when they were both in Lesotho in 2006.
The paper said it understood Harverson told police he borrowed her phone to access voicemails because his own mobile was not working.
Clarence House was reportedly satisfied Elston did nothing criminal and told detectives she was innocent.
Clarence House, the official residence of the Prince of Wales, declined to comment on the claim on Monday.

Paul Dacre accused Rebekah Brooks of trying to 'tear down' British press

Former Sun editor launched strategy designed to spread the blame for hacking to other papers, according to reports
Paul Dacre
Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre said he received reports that News International executives had encouraged celebrities to investigate whether their phones had been hacked by Mail newspapers. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA

Paul Dacre, editor of the Daily Mail, told senior managers he had received reports from PR agencies, footballers and others that News International executives had encouraged them to investigate whether their phones had been hacked by Mail group newspapers, according to the New York Times.
Based on interviews said to have been carried out with former News International staff, the New York Times also claimed Rebekah Brooks had spearheaded a strategy in recent months that appeared designed to spread the blame for hacking across Fleet Street. Several former NoW journalists claimed she asked them to dig up evidence of hacking by others, while one said Brooks's target was not her own newspapers, but those of her rivals.
In an account relayed to his management team, Dacre confronted Brooks at a hotel, telling her: "You are trying to tear down the entire industry."
Lady Claudia Rothermere, wife of the owner of the Mail, was also said to have overheard Brooks say at a dinner party that the Mail was just as culpable as the NoW.
"We didn't break the law," Lady Rothermere said, according to two sources who spoke to the New York Times. Brooks was said to have asked who Rothermere thought she was – "Mother Teresa?"
By the middle of last year, News International's lawyers and some executives were also said to have been urging that the company accept some responsibility – but Brooks disagreed. "Her behaviour all along has been resist, resist, resist," one company official was reported to have said. The US newspaper reported that Rupert Murdoch wanted to "fly commercial to London," so that he might be seen as a man of the people as he prepared to leave a conference in Idaho and come to the UK to take charge of the crisis enveloping his media empire.
He was said to have been told that would hardly do the trick, and Murdoch instead arrived in the UK on a Gulfstream G550 private jet.
Former company executives and political aides also told the New York Times that News International executives engaged in a campaign of selective leaks implicating previous management and the police.

Daily Mail would not use phone hacking or 'blagging', says Paul Dacre

Editor-in-chief tells MPs that PCC needs radical reform and defamation law is having 'chilling effect' on UK's newspapers
Paul Dacre
Paul Dacre said the Daily Mail would never 'countenance' using phone hacking or 'blagging'. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA Wire/PA Photos

The Daily Mail has never knowingly published a story based on information gleaned from phone hacking or "blagging", the paper's editor, Paul Dacre, told MPs on Monday.
Dacre, the editor-in-chief of Daily Mail publisher Associated Newspapers, told a joint parliamentary select committee on defamation law reform that he had "absolutely not" published a story he knew was based on unlawfully-accessed material.
Asked by Baroness Hayter whether he had ever "countenanced" phone hacking or blagging – a phrase used to cover a range of techniques used to get hold of private information – in his 19 years at the Mail, Dacre said: "No."
Asked whether unlawful newsgathering techniques could ever be justified, he said: "Goodness me, deep waters. I have considerable sympathy that if there's a great public interest then those methods can be justified."
However, he added later: "I don't think you should ever use hacking or blagging as a [public interest] defence because they're criminal offences."
Dacre made the rare public appearance to give evidence before a joint Commons and Lords committee on the government's draft defamation bill.
Fleet Street's longest-serving editor and a longtime supporter of the Press Complaints Commission, conceded that the self-regulatory body needed to be "radically reformed". But he conceded that it was the "least imperfect system known to man".
The Daily Mail editor is the chairman of the editors' code of practice committee, which formulates the PCC's guidelines for newspapers and magazines.
Dacre described defamation law in the UK as having a "chilling effect" on newspapers, adding that it had got "exponentially worse" in recent years. "There's not a day goes by when predatory lawyers don't try it on, encouraged by vast sums of money which can be made – most of which goes to them."
He added: "The law is becoming more and more onerous and journalists are having to become more and more respectful so it is having a chilling effect."
In April 2009, Dacre revealed that the Daily Mail had recently sacked a journalist for unauthorised use of a private detective to obtain illegal information about people.
An investigation by the information commissioner in December 2006revealed that more than 50 Daily Mail journalists had paid private detectives to obtain 982 pieces of information about celebrities and other individuals.
Associated Newspaper dismissed the investigation, dubbed Operation Motorman, at the time as "utterly meaningless" as it was a snapshot based on the activities of one private detective agency, run by Steve Whittamore. Whittamore, sold information he obtained from the police national computer until he was exposed and convicted in 2005.
The Daily Mail came out on top of a list of newspapers that had used Whittamore's services. Others included the Mail's Associated Newspapers stablemate the Mail on Sunday, the Sunday People, Daily Mirror, Sunday Times and Observer (which is published by Guardian News & Media).
When the information commissioner's report was published in late 2006 an Associated spokesman said the publisher "in common with all newspapers and broadcasters, and many other organisations, including lawyers, use search agencies to obtain information entirely legitimately from a range of public sources ... In addition, the law specifically makes provision for journalists making inquiries in the public interest".
Dacre told the Commons culture, media and sport select committee in 2009 that following the information commissioner's 2006 report, the Daily Mail had banned reporters from using outside agents to supply personal information following, except in cases of overwhelming public interest.
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Sean Hoare knew how destructive the News of the World could be

The courageous whistleblower who claimed Andy Coulson knew about phone hacking had a powerful motive for speaking out
Nick Davies

Andy Coulson
Sean Hoare worked with Andy Coulson (above) at the Sun and News of the World, but was later fired by him. Photograph: Lewis Whyld/PA

At a time when the reputation of News of the World journalists is at rock bottom, it needs to be said that the paper's former showbusiness correspondent Sean Hoare, who died on Monday, was a lovely man.
In the saga of the phone-hacking scandal, he distinguished himself by being the first former NoW journalist to come out on the record, telling the New York Times last year that his former friend and editor, Andy Coulson, had actively encouraged him to hack into voicemail.
That took courage. But he had a particularly powerful motive for speaking. He knew how destructive the News of the World could be, not just for the targets of its exposés, but also for the ordinary journalists who worked there, who got caught up in its remorseless drive for headlines.
Explaining why he had spoken out, he told me: "I want to right a wrong, lift the lid on it, the whole culture. I know, we all know, that the hacking and other stuff is endemic. Because there is so much intimidation. In the newsroom, you have people being fired, breaking down in tears, hitting the bottle."
He knew this very well, because he was himself a victim of the News of the World. As a showbusiness reporter, he had lived what he was happy to call a privileged life. But the reality had ruined his physical health: "I was paid to go out and take drugs with rock stars – get drunk with them, take pills with them, take cocaine with them. It was so competitive. You are going to go beyond the call of duty. You are going to do things that no sane man would do. You're in a machine."
While it was happening, he loved it. He came from a working-class background of solid Arsenal supporters, always voted Labour, defined himself specifically as a "clause IV" socialist who still believed in public ownership of the means of production. But, working as a reporter, he suddenly found himself up to his elbows in drugs and delirium.
He rapidly arrived at the Sun's Bizarre column, then run by Coulson. He recalled: "There was a system on the Sun. We broke good stories. I had a good relationship with Andy. He would let me do what I wanted as long as I brought in a story. The brief was, 'I don't give a fuck'."
He was a born reporter. He could always find stories. And, unlike some of his nastier tabloid colleagues, he did not play the bully with his sources. He was naturally a warm, kind man, who could light up a lamp-post with his talk. From Bizarre, he moved to the Sunday People, under Neil Wallis, and then to the News of the World, where Andy Coulson had become deputy editor. And, persistently, he did as he was told and went out on the road with rock stars, befriending them, bingeing with them, pausing only to file his copy.
He made no secret of his massive ingestion of drugs. He told me how he used to start the day with "a rock star's breakfast" – a line of cocaine and a Jack Daniels – usually in the company of a journalist who now occupies a senior position at the Sun. He reckoned he was using three grammes of cocaine a day, spending about £1,000 a week. Plus endless alcohol. Looking back, he could see it had done him enormous damage. But at the time, as he recalled, most of his colleagues were doing it, too.
"Everyone got overconfident. We thought we could do coke, go to Brown's, sit in the Red Room with Paula Yates and Michael Hutchence. Everyone got a bit carried away."
It must have scared the rest of Fleet Street when he started talking – he had bought, sold and snorted cocaine with some of the most powerful names in tabloid journalism. One retains a senior position on the Daily Mirror. "I last saw him in Little Havana," he recalled, "at three in the morning, on his hands and knees. He had lost his cocaine wrap. I said to him, 'This is not really the behaviour we expect of a senior journalist from a great Labour paper.' He said, 'Have you got any fucking drugs?'"
And the voicemail hacking was all part of the great game. The idea that it was a secret, or the work of some "rogue reporter", had him rocking in his chair: "Everyone was doing it. Everybody got a bit carried away with this power that they had. No one came close to catching us." He would hack messages and delete them so the competition could not hear them, or hack messages and swap them with mates on other papers.
In the end, his body would not take it any more. He said he started to have fits, that his liver was in such a terrible state that a doctor told him he must be dead. And, as his health collapsed, he was sacked by the News of the World – by his old friend Coulson.
When he spoke out about the voicemail hacking, some Conservative MPs were quick to smear him, spreading tales of his drug use as though that meant he was dishonest. He was genuinely offended by the lies being told by News International and always willing to help me and other reporters who were trying to expose the truth. He was equally offended when Scotland Yard's former assistant commissioner, John Yates, assigned officers to interview him, not as a witness but as a suspect. They told him anything he said could be used against him, and, to his credit, he refused to have anything to do with them.
His health never recovered. He liked to say that he had stopped drinking, but he would treat himself to some red wine. He liked to say he didn't smoke any more, but he would stop for a cigarette on his way home. For better and worse, he was a Fleet Street man.

News Corp board shocked at evidence of payments to police, says former DPP

Lord Macdonald tells committee it took him 'three to five minutes' to decide NoW emails had to be passed to police
Lord Macdonald
Lord Macdonald was in charge of the CPS when the phone-hacking prosecution of the NoW’s royal correspondent took place. Photograph: Tim Ireland/PA

"Blindingly obvious" evidence of corrupt payments to police officers was found by the former director of public prosecutions, Lord Macdonald, when he inspected News of the World emails, the home affairs select committee was told.
Explaining how he had been called in by solicitors acting for Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation board, Lord Macdonald said that when he inspected the messages it took him between "three to five minutes" to decide that the material had to be passed to police.
"The material I saw was so blindingly obvious that trying to argue that it should not be given to the police would have been a hard task. It was evidence of serious criminal offences."
He first showed it to the News Corp board in June this year. "There was no dissent," he recalled. "They were stunned. They were shocked. I said it was my unequivocal advice that it should be handed to the police. They accepted that."
That board meeting, the former DPP said, was chaired by Rupert Murdoch.
Lord Macdonald shortly afterwards gave the material to Assistant Commissioner Cressida Dick at the Metropolitan police. The nine or 10 emails passed over led to the launch of Operation Elveden, the police investigation into corrupt payments to officers for information.
Lord Macdonald, who had been in charge of the Crown Prosecution Service when the phone-hacking prosecution of the NoW's royal correspondent took place, said he had only been alerted to the case due to the convention that the DPP is always notified of crimes involving the royal family.
Members of the committee were highly critical of the CPS's narrow definition of what constituted phone hacking, claiming that it was at odds with the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.
Mark Reckless, the Conservative MP for Rochester, said that the original police investigation was hindered by the advice from the CPS that phone hacking was only an offence if messages had been intercepted before they were listened to by the intended recipient. However, Reckless said, a clause in the RIPA makes it an offence to hack in to messages even if they have already been heard.
Keir Starmer, the current DPP, said that the police had been told that "the RIPA legislation was untested". Listening to messages before they had been heard by the intended recipient was illegal, the police were told, but the question of whether intercepting them afterwards constituted a crime was "untested", he said.
Mark Lewis, the solicitor who has followed the scandal since its start, said he was the first person to lose his job over the affair when the firm in which he was a partner said it no longer wished him to pursue other victims' claims.
Lewis also told MPs that he had been threatened by lawyers acting for John Yates, the former assistant commissioner at the Metropolitan police, because of comments he had made about phone hacking.
"I have copies of a letter from Carter Ruck [solicitors] threatening to sue me on behalf of John Yates," Lewis told the home affairs select committee. He said the Guardian and the Labour MP Chris Bryant had also received threats of being sued. "The costs of the action were paid for by the Metropolitan Police, by the taxpayer," he added.
Lewis said the reason for the investigation taking so long was not due solely to the police. "The DPP seems to have got it wrong and needs to be helped out," he said.


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Phone Hacking coverage on Twitter







Axis of Logic

Ahmad Karzai: From dishwasher to drug kingpin
By Eric Walberg
Axis of Logic
Tuesday, Jul 12, 2011

Editor's Note: Compare this report by Eric Walberg with the Reuter's report republished earlier today on Axis of Logic:

REUTERS - President Karzai's younger brother killed in Kandahar

- Axis of Logic



Ahmad Wali Karzaï killed at his home in Kandahar on July 12 by the Afghan Resistance.








Ahmad Karzai: From dishwasher to drug kingpin

By Eric Walberg
Axis of Logic
Tuesday, Jul 12, 2011
Editor's Note: Compare this report by Eric Walberg with the Reuter's report republished earlier today on Axis of Logic:


- Axis of Logic



Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s younger half-brother, Ahmad Wali Karzai, was killed in Kandahar on 12 July during a gathering in his house, according to Kandahar’s Canadian Governor Tooryali Wesa. He was shot in the head and chest with a AK-47 fired by Sardar Mohammad, a former bodyguard to another Karzai brother Qayyoum. 
  
The 50-year-old Ahmad, a restaurant worker in Chicago before catapulting to fame on Hamid’s shirt-tails, was appointed chairman of the Kandahar Provincial Council in 2005. A ruthless autocrat, he was widely despised, and escaped multiple assassination attempts in the past, but his death nonetheless comes as a major blow to President Karzai in the homeland of the Taliban, and will set off a vicious power struggle to fill Ahmad’s shoes. 
  
US ambassador to Afghanistan Ronald Neumann, the CIA’s station chief and their British counterparts pleaded with the president in 2006 to exile his brother, accused of drug dealing. Hamid angrily rejected these accusations and Ahmad stayed in place, rigging the 2009 Afghan presidential elections for him, as he continued to amass wealth, extorting kickbacks on construction contracts, even shaking down bus- and truck-drivers at police posts. 
  
Whatever they thought of him, the American military readily rented properties he specially confiscated for them, including the former residence of Taliban Supreme Leader Mullah Omar. The CIA paid him to organise several mercenary forces to help them kill Taliban, even as he was working with the Taliban behind the scenes. He had the support of US Senator John Kerry and even General David Petraeus: “President Karzai is working to create a stronger, more secure Afghanistan, and for such a tragic event to happen to someone within his own family is unfathomable.” 

Resentment against the king of Kandahar was long ready to explode, and his murder was welcomed by Kandaharans and Taliban alike. Though he unwittingly recruited even more Taliban than he helped kill, Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi was happy to take responsibility for sending him on his way: “Today in Kandahar city, Hamid Karzai’s brother was killed during Operation Al-Badr. Ahmad Wali Karzai was punished for all his wrongdoings.” Qari’s comrade Mullah Adam Haji concurred: “Ahmad Wali was the best US friend and the Taliban’s worst enemy. He and his whole family have the blood of thousands of Taliban on their hands. His death is very good news for us.”

 


Eric Walberg writes for Al-Ahram Weekly  
You can reach him at http://ericwalberg.com/  His book,Postmodern Imperialism: Geopolitics and the Great Games is available at http://claritypress.com/Walberg.html 


Ahmad Wali Karzaï killed at his home in Kandahar on July 12 by the Afghan Resistance.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai’s younger half-brother, Ahmad Wali Karzai, was killed in Kandahar on 12 July during a gathering in his house, according to Kandahar’s Canadian Governor Tooryali Wesa. He was shot in the head and chest with a AK-47 fired by Sardar Mohammad, a former bodyguard to another Karzai brother Qayyoum. 

The 50-year-old Ahmad, a restaurant worker in Chicago before catapulting to fame on Hamid’s shirt-tails, was appointed chairman of the Kandahar Provincial Council in 2005. A ruthless autocrat, he was widely despised, and escaped multiple assassination attempts in the past, but his death nonetheless comes as a major blow to President Karzai in the homeland of the Taliban, and will set off a vicious power struggle to fill Ahmad’s shoes. 

US ambassador to Afghanistan Ronald Neumann, the CIA’s station chief and their British counterparts pleaded with the president in 2006 to exile his brother, accused of drug dealing. Hamid angrily rejected these accusations and Ahmad stayed in place, rigging the 2009 Afghan presidential elections for him, as he continued to amass wealth, extorting kickbacks on construction contracts, even shaking down bus- and truck-drivers at police posts. 

Whatever they thought of him, the American military readily rented properties he specially confiscated for them, including the former residence of Taliban Supreme Leader Mullah Omar. The CIA paid him to organise several mercenary forces to help them kill Taliban, even as he was working with the Taliban behind the scenes. He had the support of US Senator John Kerry and even General David Petraeus: “President Karzai is working to create a stronger, more secure Afghanistan, and for such a tragic event to happen to someone within his own family is unfathomable.” 

Resentment against the king of Kandahar was long ready to explode, and his murder was welcomed by Kandaharans and Taliban alike. Though he unwittingly recruited even more Taliban than he helped kill, Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi was happy to take responsibility for sending him on his way: “Today in Kandahar city, Hamid Karzai’s brother was killed during Operation Al-Badr. Ahmad Wali Karzai was punished for all his wrongdoings.” Qari’s comrade Mullah Adam Haji concurred: “Ahmad Wali was the best US friend and the Taliban’s worst enemy. He and his whole family have the blood of thousands of Taliban on their hands. His death is very good news for us.”
 

Eric Walberg writes for Al-Ahram Weekly 
You can reach him at http://ericwalberg.com/ His book, Postmodern Imperialism: Geopolitics and the Great Games is available athttp://claritypress.com/Walberg.html




Afghanistan: Why Civilians are Killed
By James Petras. Axis of Logic
Axis of Logic
Thursday, Jun 9, 2011



As the Arab revolt spreads from North Africa to the Gulf and deepens its demands to include socio-economic as well as political demands, the Empire is striking back. The ruling military junta in Egypt has cracked down on the prodemocracy movement and looks to its autocratic “partners” in the Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula to drown the civil society movements in a blood bath.

While standing by the crumbling dictatorships elsewhere in the region, the United States, France and the United Kingdom raced to intervene when it seemed the revolt had spread to Libya. NATO was deployed, using the UN’s new “responsibility to protect” doctrine 


Obama apology for Afghan civilian deaths. 12 children killed in US-led airstrike.

Introduction
The recent rash of civilian killings by NATO forces in occupied Afghanistan raises several basic questions: Why do US – NATO air and ground forces kill so many civilians, so persistently, over such long stretches of time, in regions throughout the country? Why have the number of civilians killed, increased in the course of the conflict? Why do NATO-US airplanes continue to bomb civilian housing and village gatherings and ground troops indiscriminately assault homes and workshops? Why are the pleas of NATO collaborator President Karzai to desist in home bombings go unheeded? Finally, knowing that the killing of civilians, entire families including children, mothers and the elderly alienates the local population and breeds widespread and profound hostility, why do the NATO-US military refuse to alter their tactics and strategy?
Explanations and Excuses for Civilian Killings

Apologists for the NATO killings of civilians are as abundant as their explanations are lacking in substance. Pentagon spokespeople speak of “accidents”, “errors of war”, “collateral damage”; media pundits blame the guerrilla fighters for engaging in warfare in areas populated by civilians; neo-conservative academics and their “think tank” colleagues blame Islamic fundamentalism for converting villagers to their cause and “forcing” NATO to kill civilians in order to create martyrs and to use their deaths as a recruiting device.
These patently superficial explanations raise more questions than answers, or in some cases, inadvertently refute the justification for the entire war. The “error of war” argument begs a more basic question: what kind of war is NATO-US engaged in that constantly finds the guerrillas ‘melting’ into the population, while the occupation breaks down doors and perceives each and every household as a possible sanctuary, or outpost of the resistance? What kind of military relies on high altitude fighter planes and pilotless planes directed from distant command posts to attack population centers, in which commerce, farming and household economies engage the population? Clearly only an army of occupation, an imperial army, is willing to repeatedly sacrifice a multitude of civilians to kill a single or a few suspected combatants. Only a military operating in a hostile civilian environment is going to assume that lodged behind every door of every home there is an “enemy”; that every family is sheltering a combatant; that it is better to “go in shooting” then to risk a bullet in the gut.
‘Accidents of war’ do not ‘just happen’ for an entire decade, covering an entire country. The killing of civilians is a result of a war of imperial conquest against an entire people who resist the occupation in whatever form is appropriate to their circumstance. The pilots and ground troops recognize that they are a hostile alien force, whose presence is commanded from above by Generals and politicians dealing with abstract schemes of ‘terrorists-linked to Al Qaeda’ that have no relation to the dense web of personal bonds of solidarity between resistance fighters and civilians on the ground in Afghanistan.
Working from these abstract categories, the strategists label extended family compounds as ‘hideouts’; family gatherings as ‘terrorist meetings’; trade caravans as ‘guerilla smugglers’. The conflicting interests of the imperial politicians, generals, strategists and military officers on the one hand and the civilian population and resistance form an immense gap. The greater the number of civilian/combatants killed the faster the career advances for imperial officers –eager for promotions and prized pensions. “Success”, according to the imperial world view is measured internationally by the number of client rulers; nationally by the number of flags pinned to the war maps denoting ‘secure cities’; and locally by the body counts of massacred families.
On the ground, among the millions in intimate family and clan circles, where sorrow and anger co-exist, resistance in all of its manifold forms unfolds: Sacred vows and the profane pledges to ‘fight on’ grow out of the millions of daily humiliations affecting young and old, wives and husbands, in homes, markets, roads and by-ways. The hostile stare of a mother sheltering an infant from soldiers breaking into a bedroom is as telling as the crackle of gunfire of a sniper hidden in a mountain crevice.
A People’s War: Not a War on Terror
The killing of civilians is not “accidental”. The fundamental reason that so many civilians are killed, everyday, in every region for over a decade, is because the civilians and the combatants are indistinguishable. The image of the Afghan combatants as some kind of footloose professional bomb throwing terrorist is completely off the mark. Most Afghan fighters have families, cultivate farmland and tend herds; they raise families and attend mosque; they are ‘part-time civilians’ and part-time fighters. Only in the schematic minds of the “great strategists of war” in the Pentagon and NATO headquarters do such distinctions exist. Their deadly military mission to ‘save the people from terrorist fundamentalists’, a self-serving self-deception, is, in fact, a ladder up the military-political hierarchy. Each step up depends on waging a ‘just war’ to a successful conclusion.
The civilian-combatants are a mass popular phenomenon. How else can we explain their capacity to sustain armed resistance for over a decade, indeed, advancing with the passing of time? How can we explain their military success against the armed forces and advisers from 40 countries, including the US, Europe and a clutch of Afro-Asian-Latin American mercenaries? How can we explain the growing resistance despite suffering from military occupation, backed by the most advanced technological instruments of war? How can we explain the ebb of popular support for the war in the ‘Conqueror’s country and the growing number of recruits for the Resistance? The combatants have the loyalty of the Afghan people; they do not have to spend billions to buy the spurious ‘loyalties’ of mercenaries who can and have at any moment ‘turned their guns the other way’.
Weddings are bombed because combatants attend weddings – along with hundreds of relatives and friends. Villages are bombed because peasants cultivate crops, which contribute to the resistance. Civilian shelters become military sanctuaries. Afghanistan is polarized: the US military versus a people in arms. Faced with this reality, the real policy of NATO-Pentagon is to rule or/and ruin. Each bomb killing dozens of civilians in search of one sharpshooter deepens the isolation and discredit of the puppet ruler. “President” Karzai has seen his mission of building a ‘civilian base’ to reconstruct the country utterly discredited. His impotent complaints to NATO to cease bombing civilian targets fall on deaf ears; because the NATO command knows very well that ‘the civilians’ are the ‘deep resistance’ – the vast reserve of support for the combatants; their eyes and ears far excel all the electronic intelligence devices of the Occupier. Just as Karzai cannot convince the civilians to turn against the combatants so he cannot convince the imperial armies to stop bombing civilian homes and gatherings.
Washington knows that with each withdrawal (or retreat), the terrain, the towns and villages are occupied by resistance fighters who emerge from everywhere. The best that the US-NATO politicians can negotiate is a safe orderly departure. The best that they can hope is that their local collaborators do not defect or flee abroad prematurely turning over billions of dollars in military ordinance to the resistance. The best the collaborators can hope is that they will secure an exit route, a visa, an overseas account and a comfortable second home abroad. What is absolutely clear is that the US, NATO and its collaborators will have no role to play in the newly independent Afghanistan.
James Petras' New Book:
FROM THE PREFACE: The popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia have overthrown the public face of the imperial-backed dictatorships in the region, and inspired supporters of popular democracy worldwide.
Clarity Press 05.03.2011

As the Arab revolt spreads from North Africa to the Gulf and deepens its demands to include socio-economic as well as political demands, the Empire is striking back. The ruling military junta in Egypt has cracked down on the prodemocracy movement and looks to its autocratic “partners” in the Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula to drown the civil society movements in a blood bath.

While standing by the crumbling dictatorships elsewhere in the region, the United States, France and the United Kingdom raced to intervene when it seemed the revolt had spread to Libya. NATO was deployed, using the UN’s new “responsibility to protect” doctrine authorizing humanitarian intervention. Already NATO intervention has exceeded the UN mandate by bombing the Libyan capital and inflicting civilian casualties. Meanwhile, western governments openly pursue regime change in Libya while seeking to forestall it elsewhere.

These essays chronicle the growing militarization of US policy in North Africa and the Gulf and the historic confrontation between the Arab democratic revolution and the imperial backed satraps; between Libyans fighting for their independence and the Euro-American naval and air forces ravaging the country on behalf of their inept local clients.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ORDER

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction

Washington Faces the Arab Revolts: 
Sacrificing Dictators to Save the State

Egypt’s Social Movements, The CIA and Mossad

Roots of the Arab Revolts and Premature Celebrations

The Euro-US War on Libya

Official Lies and Misconceptions of Critics

Libya and Obama’s Defense of the ‘Rebel Uprising’

Contextualizing the ‘Arab Spring’:
Networks of Empire and Realignments of World Power

APPENDIX:
Indicators of Social Well Being in Pre-invasion Libya

AUTHOR

James Petras is a Bartle Professor (Emeritus) of Sociology at Binghamton University, New York. He is the author of 64 books published in 29 languages, and over 560 articles in professional journals, including the American Sociological Review, British Journal of Sociology, Social Research, Journal of Contemporary Asia, and Journal of Peasant Studies. He has published over 2000 articles in nonprofessional journals such as the New York Times, the Guardian, the Nation, Christian Science Monitor, Foreign Policy, New Left Review, Partisan Review, Temps Moderne, Le Monde Diplomatique, and his commentary is widely carried on the internet. His publishers have included Random House, John Wiley, Westview, Routledge, Macmillan, Verso, Zed Books and Pluto Books. He is winner of the Life Time Career Award, Marxist Section, of the American Sociology Association, the Robert Kenny Award for Best Book, 2002, and the Best Dissertation, Western Political Science Association in 1968.

Some recent titles include Unmasking Globalization: Imperialism of the Twenty-First Century (2001); co-author The Dynamics of Social Change in Latin America (2000),Unmasking Globalisation (2001), System in Crisis (2003), co-author Social Movements and State Power (2003), co-author Empire With Imperialism (2005), co-author) Multinationals on Trial (2006). His most recent titles are The Power of Israel in the United States and Rulers and Ruled in the United States, (acquired for Japanese, German, Italian, Indonesian, Czech and Arabic editions), Zionism, Militarism and the Decline of US Power, Global Depression & Regional Wars, and War Crimes in Gaza and the Zionist Fifth Column in America. He has a long history of commitment to social justice, working in particular with the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement for 11 years. In 1973-76 he was a member of the Bertrand Russell Tribunal on Repression in Latin America. He writes a monthly column for the Mexican newspaper, La Jornada, and previously, for the Spanish daily, El Mundo. He received his B.A. from Boston University and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Comments:

Ozymandias 
Because it's part of the strategy, and it can be fun too. Let's not forget the US army took part in one of the largest genocide ever during the conquest of North America. In every war at least since WW2, civilians have been targets for US pilots and soldiers one way or another. When Uncle Sam came to "rescue" Europe, it was not that uncommon to have US soldiers shooting innocent passers by from their vehicles, for the sake of fun, and I won't talk about the many rapes which also occurred.
10 June 2011, 08:06:44
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Guest 
I think of Charles Manson. Is he crying when he sees so much killing going on and can not get a share? Is he laughing because we did not have the heart to kill one single soul back then? Has the switch in morals just baffled him? Was he a terrorist and just did not know it?
11 June 2011, 06:23:49
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Dady 
Civilians in Afghanistan, Libya, and elsewhere are being bombed as part of a collective punishment. Even the most depraved warmongers feel they must apologize for bombing weddings, funerals, markets, mosques, hospitals, and schools, because they know that this is criminal. Civilians are not "indistinguishable" from combatants -- not even if they are related to the combatants or are sympathetic to the resistance against invasion.
17 June 2011, 23:28:33
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The ICC issues warrants against Col. Qaddafi and his son while US/NATO bombs civilians and their 'rebels' force cannibalism on captured Libyan soldiers

By Richard Falk with Axis of Logic Commentary
Al Jazeera
Friday, Jul 1, 2011
Editor's Comment: This juridical analysis indicts the U.S. and NATO for their genocidal war on Libya in the midst of US/NATO-spawned ICC warrants being issued for the arrest of Col. Muammar Qaddafi, as well as his son, Seif al-Islam. But it doesn't take a Professor Emeritus of International Law like Peter Falk to come to the same conclusions. Any honest person with common sense sees the absurdity of the illegal-legal attack on Col. Qaddafi and his son and the way the US and NATO have turned the international court into warmongering tribunal. While accusing Col. Qaddafi and his son of "crimes against humanity," the U.S. and NATO continue their slaughter of Libyan civilians with aerial bombing and missile attacks.
One Axis of Logic reader sent us videos of the treatment of Libyan soldiers taken prisoner by the so-called 'rebels', funded and supported militarily by the U.S. and NATO. They included live decapitations, hangings, dismemberment, fatal beatings and Libyan prisoners forced suck on the tongue of a dead dog and to crawl on their knees, hands tied behind their backs and eat and swallow the flesh of fellow prisoners taken captive and executed. The morality of the leaders in Washinton and European capitals is no different. The videos we reviewed were too sickening and awful to show on Axis of Logic but we want the world to know just who and what these 'unarmed protestors' are -with the backing of the U.S. and NATO. The ICC warrants are a transparent mockery.
- Les Blough, Editor

Doubts surround Gaddafi arrest warrants 
Al Jazeera
June 29, 2011
The timing and nature of the issuance of arrest warrants against Gaddafi and his allies verifies complex geopolitics.
The International Criminal Court has accused Gaddafi of crimes against humanity and of ordering attacks on civilians [EPA]
The International Criminal Court has formally agreed that warrants should be issued for the arrest of Col. Muammar Qaddafi, as well as his son, Seif al-Islam, who has been acting as Prime Minister along with Libya's intelligence chief, Abdullah Senussi. These three Libyan leaders are charged with crimes against humanity involving the murder, injuring, and imprisoning of Libyan civilians between Feburary 10-18, 2011, the first days of the uprising and prior to NATO's military involvement. The ICC judge speaking on behalf of a three-judge panel authorized the issuance of the arrest warrants, Sanji Monogeng of Botswana, on the basis of the evidence presented by the prosecutor that 'reasonable grounds' existed to support the charges contained in the outstanding indictments against these three individuals. Judge Monogeng clarified the ruling by explaining that issuing an arrest warrant was meant to convey the conclusion that sufficient evidence of criminality existed to proceed with the prosecution, but it is not intended to imply guilt, which must be determined by the outcome of a trial.
The ICC assessment is likely to withstand scrutiny so far as the substance of the accusations directed at the Qaddafi leadership are concerned. Qaddafi clearly responded to the popular challenges directed against the Libyan government with extreme violence against civilians, reinforced by genocidal rhetoric, which certainly seems to involve crimes against humanity. But why was such an effort to arrest and indict was pushed so hard at this time. The timing of the indictment, and now the arrest warrants, arouses strong suspicions, and not just of bad judgment! It is relevant to recall that in the course of NATO's Kosovo War in 1999 against Serbia, the Serbian president, Slobodan Milosevic, was indicted by another European-based international tribunal--the special ad hoc International Criminal Tribunal for Former Yugoslavia. Are we now to expect that whenever NATO has recourse to war the political leader heading its opposition will be charged with international crimes while the fighting ensues? How convenient! Lawfare in the service of warfare!
Rather than a matter of convenience, the motivation seems more sinister. Criticism is deflected from NATO's own lawlessness. In both of these instances, NATO had itself has resorting to war unlawfully, engaging in what was designated at Nuremberg as a 'crime against peace,' and held by that tribunal to be the greatest of war crimes embracing within itself both crimes against humanity and gross violations of the laws of war (war crimes). In the Kosovo War NATO acted without a mandate from the UN, thereby violating the UN Charter's core principle prohibiting non-defensive uses of force unless authorized by the Security Council. In Libya there was such an initial authorization to protect civilians by establishing a no fly zone (Security Council Resoultion 1973, 17 May 2011), but the NATO mission as executed almost immediately grossly exceeded the original mandate, and did little to hide its unmandated goal of regime change in Tripoli by way of ending Qaddafi's role as ruler and thereby achieving victory for opposition forces in a civil war. It is certainly worthy of comment that in both of these wars initiated by NATO the leader of a country attacked was targeted for criminal prosecution before hostilities has ended. Even the Allies in World War II waited until after the end of combat before trying to impose their version of 'victors justice' on surviving defeated German and Japanese leaders.
A similar manipulation of criminal accountability occurred in Iraq a few years ago. There the American led aggressive war waged against Iraq in 2003 was quickly followed by a carefully planned and orchestrated criminal prosecution, stage managed behind the scenes by the US occupation commanders), followed by the execution of Saddam Hussein (and his close associates). The Iraqi trial was politically circumscribed so as to exclude any evidence bearing on the close and discrediting strategic relationship maintained between the United States and Iraq during the period of Saddam Hussein's most serious instances of criminality (genocidal operations against Kurdish villages), as well as by disallowing any inquiry into American criminality associated with the attack on Iraq and subsequent allegations of criminal wrongdoing in response to Iraqi resistance to military occupation. This American potential criminality was never discussed, much less investigated in a responsible manner.
What converts these separate instances into a pattern is the Eurocentric (or West-centric) selectivity evident in most recent efforts to enforce international criminal law. It should be noted that this selectivity is made more objectionable by the impunity accorded to European, American, and Israeli leaders. Double standards so pervasively evident in this behavior undermine the authority of law, especially in relation to a subject-matter as vital as war and peace. Unless equals are treated equally most of the time, what is called 'law' is more accurately treated as 'geopolitics.'
The geopolitical nature of this approval of arrest warrants just issued by the ICC is unintentionally confirmed when it is acknowledged by NATO officials that it will not be possible to arrest Qaddafi unless in the unlikely event that he is captured by the Rebels. Governmental representatives in Washington admitting this, have declared that the warrants will nevertheless be useful in forthcoming UN debates about Libyan policy, presumably to push aside any objections based on the failure by NATO to limit military operations to the no fly zone initially authorized by the Security Council. It should be remembered that the initial authorization in SC Resolution 1973 was itself weakened by five abstentions, including China and Russia, and further, by South Africa that voted with the majority, while expressing strong objections to the subsequent undertaking. One wonders whether China and Russia would not have used their veto had they anticipated how far beyond what was insisted on limited humanitarian purposes by the proponents of the use of force would the actual operation become. In effect, to overcome any impression of unlawfulness on NATO's part it is useful to demonize the adversary, and an opportune way to reach this goal is to put forward premature accusations of severe criminality.
Of course, as has been pointed out more than once, there was an embedded hypocrisy in the central argument put forward by the states seeking a UN green light to intervene in Libya, which was based on the responsibility to protect norm that supposedly confers a duty on the international community to protect civilian populations that are being subjected to severely abusive behavior. Too obvious contradictions were present. Why not Syria in the current regional setting? And even more starkly, why not Gaza back in 2008-09 when it was being mercilessly attacked by Israel? The answers to such questions are 'blowin' in the wind.'
There are further more technical reasons in the present setting to challenge the timing of the arrest warrants. They seem legally and politically dubious. Legally dubious because the most serious criminality associated with the behavior of the Qaddafi regime during the conflict occurred after the ICC cutoff date of 18 February (e.g. the siege of Misrata). Why other than ulterior motivations was there this rush to prosecute? Politically dubious because there is now a new obstacle to diplomacy in a situation where the alternative seems likely to be a prolonged civil war. Negotiating space for an accommodation is definitely reduced by this implication of Qaddafi's criminality that creates incentives for the Tripoli leadership to fight on as long as possible.
Perhaps, cynics would argue that law always reflects power, and of course they are correct to a certain extent. Progress in human affairs arises from a struggle against such pretensions. And the locus and nature of power is changing in the world: the West is losing its capacity to shape history and high technology warfare, upon which the West depends to enforce its will on the non-West, is losing its capacity to produce political victories (e.g. anti-colonial wars, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan). This politicized use of the ICC in the course of the Libyan War offers an opportunity for those dedicated to global justice, especially in the Arab world, to insist that international law should no longer serve as a plaything for those who intervene with hard power in their region from the comfort zone of NATO headquarters.
Richard Falk is Albert G Milbank Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton University and Research Professor in Global and International Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has authored and edited numerous publications spanning a period of five decades. His most recent book is Achieving Human Rights (2009).
He is currently serving his fourth year of a six year term as a United Nations Special Rapporteur on Palestinian human rights.
Source: Al Jazeera


Dick's Personality Disorder
By Les Blough. Axis of Logic
Axis of Logic
Sunday, Jul 10, 2011

The classic drunk has often been a favorite subject in comedy - the staggering, loudmouthed, speechslurring, disoriented, bragging drunk who wakes after a night of revelry asking himself, "Oh my God, what did I say last night! What did I do!!" An excessively high blood alcohol count produces delusional thinking, overestimated abilities, poor reaction time, arrogance, swagger, a sense of invincibility and impaired judgment. I suppose most of us have laughed at one time or another at foolish drunks and maybe we've been among them from time to time, but we’ve also seen their tragic car accidents, loss of careers and jobs, violence, crimes committed and broken lives and families.
Strangely enough, as with the mismanagement of alcohol, some scientists think that men who mismanage their levels of the hormone testosterone can also produce maladaptive behaviors such as aggression, etc. Particularly, young men may ride high T-levels to their own destruction or that of others. Others may react to low T-levels with sometimes bizarre behaviors such as aggression and impaired judgment. Among older men this is known as Aging Male Syndrome (AMS). As the US/French/British/Israeli/NATO war wears on in Libya we may be seeing both, the young bucks riding jets of high T-Levels and the onset of AMS among the aging leaders who suffer from feelings of emasculation. The point of this essay is not to argue the science of T-levels. But should either be true, perhaps NATO, now 62 years old, suffers from AMS, resulting in impaired judgment, massive tragedy and crimes of global proportions.
Dick
The "US/French/British/Israeli/NATO" reference is a bit cumbersome for the writer and reader of this essay. So to facilitate the discussion, we will use a rather common English name for this coalition of the semi-willing. We'll collectively call them "Dick." Now unlike ordinary folks who have only two eyes, Dick is blessed with many eyes. At the onset of the assault on Libya, some of this drunk's eyes glistened with reflections of oil derricks; some of the eyes in Dick's head shone with more land and a coveted, giant aquifier for an expanded Israel; other pupils in his crossed-eyes widened with thoughts of the advent of the apocalypse ushering in the arrival of their Savior to take them all under his protection in the sky while unbelivers descend into a millenium of hell and suffering on planet earth. Still other Dickeyes blicked with uncertainty but agreed to go along with Dick's war when they smarted bitterly with the dust of their failing economies and threats of being excluded from the Big Prize when the war would finally be won.
But the biggest eye of all, located in the middle of Dick's forehead, shone brightly with visions of a Corporate Global Empire (GCE), breaking up OPEC and making one more stride toward 'full spectrum dominance' and control of all global resources. When notified of the plan, the eyes of the GCE's corporate CEOs smiled and spoke confidently with their trustees in board rooms as they thought of end-of-year bonuses and the trustees smiled back, thinking about returns on their investments. Dick was very pleased with himself.
The Little Dicks
It was with all these eyes on the prize that Dick entered the war on Libya bristling with missiles, jet fighters, helicopter gunships and a ragtag, uneducated tribe of angry, disgruntled men that Dick called "the rebels." Reluctantly, but to remain consistent with the casting of this comedy noir, we will call them the "Little Dicks."
Dick convinced his little dicks that they have been disenfranchised, oppressed and that they should be the ones in power in Tripoli. He told them he would give them all the arms they needed to rise up and overthrow their perceived oppressor, the Libyan government. With their own swollen organs and misguided judgement in their ability to run a country, the little dicks fussed with each other who should lead the coup, who would get the best small arms, RPGs, explosives and whatever other weapons Dick would give to them. The rather disorganized little dicks gathered in small groups whispering, "We can do this and maybe we can even do that!" But they worried that the Libyan military might be too strong for them. Dick reassured the little dicks not to worry - that he would provide furious air support and bomb the hell out of any Libyan forces that tried to kill them.
So the war began with Dick and his little dicks against the soverign nation of Libya, their legitimate government, military and the vast majority of the Libyan people. Dick dropped bombs, destroyed infrastructure, killed Libyan soldiers, civilian men, women and children and even accidentally killed a few little dicks who were in the wrong place in the wrong time. The little dicks used their gifts from Dick to attack and destroy government buildings, Libyan police stations, capture a few Libyan tanks and arms, kill Libyan soldiers and torture those whom they captured. Months before OPEC's June 8 meeting in Vienna, Dick helped the little dicks organize a provisional government in Benghazi which they named, "The National Transitional Council of the Libyan Republic." The NTCLR was to become the only legitimate Libyan government and the political face of the little dicks. They proudly announced that they would represent Libya at the OPEC meeting but they were sadly disappointed when OPEC refused to recognize them and hosted the Libyan government's legal representative whom they know so well.
Since then, the little dicks have been licking their wounds, burying their dead and accusing Dick of breaking his promises to them. Dick's multiple eyes on the other hand are glaring at each other and some have closed altogether. One of his members accuses the other and some are heading home, wimpering with tails between legs, glancing back over their shoulder and snarling at Dick. Dick has become smaller and a little more limp while accusing his traitors' personalities of cowardice and impotence.
Like the drunk, Dick and his little dicks are now turning over in their shared bed, rousing from their slumber, hung over, disoriented, wondering where the hell they parked their cars and experiencing a massive, collective headache. Big Dick also appears to be waking to a multiple personality disorder, with their various identities accusing one another of not doing enough, not sticking together, not dropping enough bombs and not paying their fair share in their ambitious enterprise.
 
Dick's Schizoid Personality
So poor Dick also seems to be suffering from a form of multiple personalities in conflict with one another. The fault lines run in economic and pragmatic patterns but not along lines of conscience. Conscience is a lost trait among psychotics.
Of Dick's 28 NATO countries, only 8 initially agreed to participate in the war: the United States, France, Britain, Italy, Canada, Netherlands, Spain and Turkey. Ok, there were a few other minor league players like Norway that got wrangled from the farm teams but these were the primary belligerants. When Dick first entered Libya's bedroom, the U.S. suppport for all of the NATO expenditure was 75 percent. In June, Dick's head spokesman and US War Secretary, Robert Gates complained specifically about the Netherlands, Spain, Turkey, Germany and Poland as "big NATO countries that are not doing their share." He whined about NATO not sharing its burden of the costs and military. Hillary Clinton, who arguably has no testosterone, echoed Gate's complaint from the U.S. State Department.
When some of Dick's disparate personalities wimpered that things weren't going well, they treatened to withdraw from the war on Libya. NATO's Secretary General, Anders Fogh Rasmussen dutifully followed Gates, lock-step, warning that Dick would not be able to complete the gang rape of Libya unless NATO invested more in military spending and patching together their fractured alliance, chinning up with greater political will. Dick's fissures began to open.
Germany
Surprising some and angering others, one of Dick's personalities strongly opposed the war on Libya from the very beginning. They abstained from voting in favor of UNSC's Resolution 1973 on Libya. On June 23, Germany abstained in the UN security council vote authorising the air strikes and ignored criticism from other Dick members, the U.S., the U.K. and France. Thomas de Maiziere, the German defence minister, then said Berlin had decided not to get involved and"That's the way it will stay."
On March 23, a German military spokesman said it was even recalling two frigates and AWACS surveillance plane crews from the Mediterranean, fearing they would be drawn into the assault if NATO takes over control from the U.S.
German government consultant and political analyst, Christoph Horste explained:
“At first hand our ministries told the foreign affairs minister ‘Don’t go to Libya. It is a very bad conflict. It was started by the CIA, and it is a dirty business. Don’t go there!’ So this is why he voted with Russia and China. Now the backlash from Washington is so tough that obviously we are under pressure to do something to make up for this decision. In fact, what we see here is that deliberately the country is being destroyed, which is by far transgressing the decision by the Security Council and that is a very bad story right now.”
It was then, after over 100 days of aerial attacks and with more than 2,000 of Dick's bombs dropped, the gang rape ran into an unexpected problem: a lack of munitions to drop on Libyans. So on July 5, under enormous pressure from Dick and with the reflection of the sweet euro symbol in their eyes, Germany agreed to stroke Dick with an agreement to supply munitions for his airstrikes in Libya. As the saying goes, where there is demand, there is supply and where there is desire, there is pleasure.
 
The United Kingdom
At the onset, the perpetrators of Dick's war against the Libyan people were France, England and the U.S. In March, Chancellor George Osborne told the people of the UK that it would cost tens of millions of pounds. Now the cost of the war has grown to hundreds of millions of pounds. The UK economy is already in bad shape and these costs are increasing rapidly on a daily basis. When asked if the UK can afford to continue in the war, Jim Bran (Stop the War Coalition in London) recently told Press TV:
"I think in a sense you could say they can afford it because it comes out of something called a contingency reserve. But clearly there's a problem that they really don't know where it's going to end - they have no idea. Every calculation back in March has gone out the window. It was supposed to be a quick war. It was supposed to be tens of millions as you've mentioned and a number of days. I think they thought they could dive in and do kind of an armed coup within about a week and that's all gone wrong; its' all up in the air."
Of course Bran's reference to money coming from the UK's "contingency reserve" war chest ignores the massive debt in EU countries like Greece, Portugal, Spain, Ireland and Italy which in our view could easily trigger a domino collapse of the EU and the euro having devastating effects on the UK and the U.S.
France
On March 19, according to Press TV Dick's French president Nicolas Sarkozy proudly reported that "Paris will lead an attack on Libyan territories in a bid to protect the civilian population and preserve human consciousness." On the same day, the peaceful war advocate, NPR reported,
 
"France was one of the most strident countries against the invasion of Iraq so it's unusual to see that country taking the lead in the strike against Libya, according to NPR's Eleanor Beardsley. Still, the French seem to be proud of how diplomatically Nicholas Sarkozy has handled the effort. The French president has said that, there are some risks, but they are calculated and there is great moral authority to go in and protect people.
The plan congealed on March 19, when Dick met in Paris and ordered the bombing of Libya "to end the assaults on civilians launched by Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi's forces."Representatives of the United States, Britain, France, the United Arab Emirates, and Qatar attended the meeting.
On March 25, Sarkozy declared, "France will lead the attack on Gaddafi!”
Stone Pinkerton writing for the 21st Century Wire accused Sarkozy of suffering from a Napoleon Complex, standing only 5 feet 5 inches tall while shaking hands with England's 6 foot David Cameron to their Libyan invasion agreement. 
So " Odyssey Dawn: The military operation" (c'mon, doncha love it?) began. Eight French Rafale and four Mirage jets were first launched against Libya in the aerial attack, 20 in all before the day was over. The French Rafale jets were credited with the honor of being the first to bomb Libya, evoking images of Sarkozy fondling those missiles before they took off from their base at Saint-Dizier in eastern France.
On June 19 a French bombing killed nine civilians including 2 toddlers and seriously injuring dozens of others in the Arada neighbourhood of Tripoli. A day before, the Libyan government accused NATO of specifically targeting civilians. According to French and English news reports, Dick said he was investigating the killings and was "very sorry" about them.
Norway
But in spite of the continuing demand for unity within NATO for its war on Libya, the cracks in the dike began to widen with Norway's recent decision to withdraw and sparked fears that others may follow.
On July 5, 2011, the Los Angeles Times reported,
"Norway, whose small air force has carried out a disproportionate 10% of the strikes with six fighter planes, last month became the first country to set an end date to its role. The government has been facing calls for withdrawal from its leftist coalition partners. Norway's Defense Ministry said it planned to reduce its contribution to four fighters and to withdraw entirely by Aug. 1."
Denmark
 
As early as March 30, 2011, the Red-Green Alliance of Denmark stated that the war on Libya was no longer just about achieving a ceasefire between the Libyan government and the little dicks for protection of civilians. They determined that instead, it is about participating in a civil war, something they would not support. Frank Aaen, the alliance's defence policy spokesperson covered Denmark's behind stating,
"The direction that the action has taken is in clear opposition to the UN resolution, and there has been no serious attempts to establish a ceasefire ... Since last Friday they had succeeded in stopping the attacks from Gadaffi on the civilian population. It was a correct decision to stop his attack, and we are pleased to have been part of it ... But lately the operation has changed its character, so now we are involved in a civil war. The last couple of days the rebels had received air support to help them push forward, and even though we feel a great sympathy with the rebels, it is not the task of the military action to support one of the parties in a civil war."
U.S. officials accused Denmark and Norway for “punching above their weight,” (read 'for not being real men.')
The Netherlands
NATO's fractures continued as the Netherlands broke rank early this month with Defense Minister Hans Hillen complaining of "mission creep", suggesting that the leading countries in the war were deluded in believing they could crush Qadaffi and his forces. Hillen told reporters in Brussels,
"People who thought that merely by throwing some bombs it would not only help the people, but also convince Kadafi that he could step down or alter his policy were a little bit naive."
The United States
Meanwhile, the Republicans in Washington continued their objections to the war. Now the Republicans are well-known for their collective warmongering personality. Their objections are motivated strictly by their aspirations to replace Obama and the Democrats with their own in the next national elections. We only have to see their support for the wars under George W. Bush in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan and by their Israeli proxy in Palestine. They've continued their attack on the Obama regime declaring that Obama did not seek approval from the U.S. Congress for the attacks on Libya, something Bush did before attacking the aforenamed countries when the Republicans gleefully approved the bloodletting.
Italy
On July 6, Italy further softened Dick with its withdrawal of the Garibaldi. The Garibalidi is their aircraft carrier in service to Dick. For a real man like Berlusconi, well known for his virility, this must come with great humiliation and loss of self confidence in Dick's bed. But never to admit weakness in this area, Italy quickly explained that their weakening support for the war was due to their dismay at the humanitarian disaster and civilians killed by Dick's bombs. Nearly a month ago, Italy called for a suspension of hostilities in Libya among NATO's 'coalition of the unwilling' as more and more civilians were being killed by NATO airstrikes and as the Libyan government and military defended their country with a force that surprised Dick with his pants around his ankles. On June 22, 2011, Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini told a parliamentary committee meeting:
"We have seen the effects of the crisis and therefore also of NATO action not only in eastern and southwestern regions but also in Tripoli. I believe an immediate humanitarian suspension of hostilities is required in order to create effective humanitarian corridors."
Frattini recommended that negotiations should continue on a more formal ceasefire and peace talks stating,
"I think this is the most urgent and dramatic point ... I think it is legitimate to request ever more detailed information on the results", and he condemned "the dramatic errors that hit civilians, which is clearly not an objective of the NATO mission."
Reporting on the same June 22 parliamentary meeting, AFP reported Italy breaks ranks over NATO's Libya mission:
"Italy called for a suspension of hostilities in Libya on Wednesday in the latest sign of dissent within NATO as the civilian death toll mounts and Moamer Kadhafi shows no signs of quitting power."
Frattini told the committee:
"I believe an immediate humanitarian suspension of hostilities is required in order to create effective humanitarian corridors," while negotiations should also continue on a more formal ceasefire and peace talks.
French President Nicolas Sarkozy, the first belligerent to follow US/Israeli urging the attack on Libya, quickly reacted to Italy's discord ruling out any pause in the Libya campaign. French foreign ministry spokesman Bernard Valero told the corporate media:
"The coalition and the countries that met as the Abu Dhabi contact group two weeks ago were unanimous on the strategy: we must intensify the pressure on Kadhafi. Any pause in operations would risk allowing him to play for time and to reorganise. In the end, it would be the civilian population that would suffer from the smallest sign of weakness on our behalf."
On July 6, Italy followed through with it's threat by announcing the withdrawal of its aircraft carrier, the Garibaldi from Libya which in reality was due to two factors:
  1. the burden it's aircraft carrier in Libya places on its failing economy. Withdrawal of the Garibaldi will relieve Italy of 80 million euros ($114 million) in financial emissions.

  2. the fact that the legitimate Libyan government and military has been successfully repelling Dick's attacks and the Italians are running scared.
However, Italy did admit that they didn't have the juice for Dick's demands, but said they would offer him a partial dose of Viagra. Italian Minister Ignazio La Russa explains:
"We have cut back costs in Libya, from 142 million euros forecast in the first half of the year to less than 60 million for the second half." He indicated that the Italian plan is to pull the Garibaldi, it's three fighter jets and 1,000 personnel out of the mission because they were "no longer necessary."
But he offered Dick a little something saying that the Garibaldi would be replaced by a smaller boat and other planes from military bases would be used.
As the late Rollo May, philosopher/psychologist extraordinaire, once wrote, people and nations locate their own sins outside of themselves and then set about to expiate their sins by attacking and killing the ones upon whom they've projected their own evil. We saw a lot of this action during the Cold War with the Soviets and now with Arabs and Muslims. Dick's psychosis is now well advanced and his delusions are becoming super-real. He is not unlike the serial killers who self righteously murder prostitutes to destroy their own darkness (Ironically, serial killers have been studied a lot in Dickland.) In time, killers suffering from paranoid schizophrenia become increasingly frenzied by their own impotence and bloodlust. They break their patterns that worked so well for them with earlier victims and they begin to make mistakes. Likewise, Dick's rage is gaining intensity with his fear of impotence as his Libyan rampage seeks to destroy all that he cannot have. His mask of protecting civilians has been removed, revealing his real identity, rapidly bringing nearer the day of his reckoning.
READ MORE ESSAYS AND POETRY BY LES BLOUGH


Ex-Blackwater guard sentenced to 37 months for Afghan's death 

Ex-Blackwater guard sentenced to 37 months for Afghan’s death. Grey Mailing and Judge Shopping
By Les Blough, Editor. Axis of Logic
Axis of Logic
Sunday, Jun 19, 2011

Blackwater employees, Christopher Drotleff and Justin Cannon murdered two unarmed Afghan people and wounded a third in 2009. They were tried for the killings in 2010 and half of the stacked jury (see the Wayne Madson video below) acquitted them of all charges and the other half disagreed and voted for conviction - a hung jury. Prosecutors tried them again and Drotleff was found guilty of a lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter and has been sentenced to 3 years in prison. Cannon is to be sentenced in July in what amounts to another coverup trial. They shot and killed a passenger of a car involved in an accident of one of their own SUV - and a pedestrian who was out walking his dog with a friend. Websites like The Ranger Defense Fund  were created to collect money for Drotleff and Cannon and to conjure up popular sympathy for these mercenaries and their families. "The Virginia Pilot ", a U.S. government mouthpiece wrote:
"Family members were clearly upset by the decision. Drotleff's wife, who sat through every day of the trial, left the courthouse in tears. Cannon's father, also there every day, declined to comment.
The authors obviously have no sympathy for the murdered Afghans and their shattered families.
Christopher Drotleff
Justin Russell Cannon
The prosecutors alleged, "the shootings on May 5, 2009, were fueled by alcohol and anger. The case against Drotleff and Cannon only worsened afterward when they tried to cover up the crime." Witnesses said the two mercenaries had been drinking alcohol throughout the day before they opened fire on the unarmed civilians. Other media friendly to these two killers claimed they are "sacrificial lambs" hung out to dry by their employer - the U.S. government. We say yes - sacrificial lambs drunk on booze and bloodlust, armed to the teeth and trained to kill. But we have no argument with their claim that they are being sacrificed in faux courts to give the impression that their killings are any worse than the murders of millions by the U.S. government Afghanistan and Iraq, many never identified and buried in mass graves.
Blackwater mercenary killer, Christopher Drotleff, sentenced to 3 years and 1 month on a reduced charge of involuntary manslaughter.
Blackwater mercenary killer, Justin Russell Cannon to be sentenced on the same conviction on July 27, 2011.
RT News  interviewed investigative journalist, Wayne Madsen who provides details of how Blackwater protects their own by "grey mailing" and how the CIA protects Blackwater killers, including Drotleff and Cannon by "jury shopping" and "judge shopping" to obtain the results they want.
In the video above, Wayne Madsen says U.S. District Court Judges T.S. Ellis and Ricardo Urbina "have long-standing relationships with the CIA and this is known as 'judge shopping'." Other judges in the system indirectly channel government-sensitive cases to these two men.
Judge T.S. Ellis III presiding over the Blackwater case in US District Court in Alexandria, VA, "A favorite court of the CIA with their 'rocket docket'." Judge Ricardo Urbina who dismissed charges against the 4 Blackwater killers in Iraq in U.S. District Court in Washington D.C.
We pray that some day those ultimately responsible for these two murders will be arrested, prosecuted and imprisoned - the Neocons and Neolibs, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Pentagon, CIA, owners of private corporations like Blackwater and two U.S. Presidents, George Walker Bush and Barack Obama - will one day be tried for an illegal invasion and occupation, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Think this is can never happen? Prior to September 11, 2011 none of us thought possible what we have seen happen in the world over the last ten years. Therefore, we cannot predict what will happen in the future. You personally may think that you are insignificant and helpless to do anything. Everyone can think creatively and do something no matter how big or small. We must do what each of us can to add our own brick in the wall to see that justice will be done, from Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan to Palestine, Libya and other countries where the U.S., NATO, Israel and the international banking cartel press on to advance their terrorist war on "terrorism."
- Les Blough, Editor
Ex-Blackwater guard sentenced to 37 months for Afghan’s death
By Agence France-Presse 
WASHINGTON — A former Blackwater security guard was sentenced to three years and one month in prison Tuesday for involuntary manslaughter in a Kabul shooting in 2009, the US Justice Department announced.
Christopher Drotleff, 31, and Justin Cannon, 29, another former Blackwater employee, were convicted in March of involuntary manslaughter of Romal Mohammad Naiem, an unarmed Afghan civilian. Cannon will be sentenced on June 27.
Both men fired several multiple shots at a passing car after the lead vehicle in their convoy crashed in the middle of the night and overturned on its side.
Naiem, the passenger in the car, was fatally shot, and his driver injured. Another Afghan man walking his dog in the area was also fatally shot, although both men were acquitted of charges in his death and the shooting of the driver.
Both Drotleff and Cannon said they had legitimate concerns for their safety, and had pleaded not guilty.
"Christopher Drotleff recklessly fired his nine millimeter pistol at unarmed Afghan civilians, killing two people and shattering the lives of many more," said US Attorney Neil MacBride in a statement.
According to the statement, both Drotleff and Cannon left their military base on May 5, 2009 to transport local translators when the accident took place.
Blackwater was renamed Xe after it was caught up in several scandals in Iraq, in particular the deaths of between 14 and 17 civilians in Baghdad in September 2007.
Ozymandias 
3 years & 1 month ?? Come on... this is ridiculous ! Thousands of people are jailed for a longer time every year Because a few MJ plants in their backyard or cupboard and these guys get just 3 years for killing innocent people ? Oh wait, my mistake, for killing "Afghans", not people...
Monday, June 20, 2011, 09:04:35
– Like – Reply
Guest 
Rotten to the core, from mercenary to judge. Thank you for this excellent expose.
Monday, June 20, 2011, 18:34:02
– Like – Reply
the.official black.widow 
I say lets call these guys what they really are. COWARDS. Only a coward shoots an unarmed person or animal for that matter. But I guess if you are an American you can shoot people dead in other countries and it will not be treated like a murder case and people will say you are a mercenary. CALL THEM WHAT THEY ARE WHEN THEY COMMIT ACTS OF COWARDICE..AND SEE IF THE CIA JUMPS TO HELP THEM THEN.
Tuesday, June 28, 2011, 17:06:10
– Like – Reply
Ex-Blackwater guard sentenced to 37 months for Afghan’s death
By Agence France-Presse
WASHINGTON — A former Blackwater security guard was sentenced to three years and one month in prison Tuesday for involuntary manslaughter in a Kabul shooting in 2009, the US Justice Department announced.
Christopher Drotleff, 31, and Justin Cannon, 29, another former Blackwater employee, were convicted in March of involuntary manslaughter of Romal Mohammad Naiem, an unarmed Afghan civilian. Cannon will be sentenced on June 27.
Both men fired several multiple shots at a passing car after the lead vehicle in their convoy crashed in the middle of the night and overturned on its side.
Naiem, the passenger in the car, was fatally shot, and his driver injured. Another Afghan man walking his dog in the area was also fatally shot, although both men were acquitted of charges in his death and the shooting of the driver.
Both Drotleff and Cannon said they had legitimate concerns for their safety, and had pleaded not guilty.
"Christopher Drotleff recklessly fired his nine millimeter pistol at unarmed Afghan civilians, killing two people and shattering the lives of many more," said US Attorney Neil MacBride in a statement.
According to the statement, both Drotleff and Cannon left their military base on May 5, 2009 to transport local translators when the accident took place.
Blackwater was renamed Xe after it was caught up in several scandals in Iraq, in particular the deaths of between 14 and 17 civilians in Baghdad in September 2007.

Who or what organisation and/or group was behind the murder and coverup of the murder of whistleblower on illegal 

phone hacking by police and other people working for the London Met Police and other reporters in the News Media, 

illegal blinging by members of the London Met Police and police bribery Sean Hoare who was about to tell his full story 

through providing

 evidence to the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 


the-murdoch-empire-the-short-answer-is-no-2317226.htm

Martin Hickman: Was Sean Hoare killed by the Murdoch empire?

 The short answer is no

The who organised the murder and cover up of the murder of Sean Hoare?
Who had most to lose if Sean Hoare had lived to tell his story in a court of law, judicial inquiry and/or in front of the parliamentary select committee on the 19th July 2011?
Answer: The London Metropolitan Police

Who has the best ability to cover up the murder of Sean Hoare?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

Who has the best ability and resources and has access to MI5 and MI6resources as well to use to murder Sean Hoare?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

Who is in charge of the investigation of the murder of Sean Hoare?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

Who is mostly to blame in the Murdoch-News of the world phone hacking, blinging, police bribery etc scandal?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police?

How many London Met Police Officers have been charged for bribery and the illegal use of police information and resources?

Answer: None

Who do the London Met Police think that  the public going to point the finger at for the murder of Sean Hoare?

Answer? The Murdoch Gang

What were the new serious statements that Sean Hoare were making to New York Times Reporters in recent days that would want some one or some group to murder Sean Hoaare in a rather hurry before he was called to the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 that would have blow the lid of this affair right open?

Answer: The London Metropolitan Police involvement with the news staff at the News of the World in using police sources and technology to find where someone was buy using police computers and other police technology to locate a person's whereabouts by through their mobile phone for a fee of £300 a time. Sean Hoare was starting to make statements to international reporters about the endemic practice and involvement of the London Met Police in this practice known as blinging in the news trade. Yes the London Met Police had to immediately silence Sean Hoare and make sure he could not attend the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 to give evidence for the whole world to see on line about his knowledge of this practice of blinging that members of the London Metropolitan Police had been doing for years for a fee of £300 a time. There is no doubt that the most senior members of the London Metropolitan Police including the one that has just resigned Sir Paul Stephenson, simply had to call in a favour of MI5 and M16 to have Sean Hoare quietly murdered using a new drug they have that can cause a heart attack and can not be detected after death in the body and can be placed in a glass of water without the person drinking it being able to detect that it has been put into the water as it has no taste and no colour. This is what was used to murder the famous millionaire businessman Laurie Connel on Western  Australia when he threatened to expose many of the most powerful  people in Australian politics and business circles if he went to jail over fraud charges he was defending in court at the time of his death when he collapsed during his trial where he was defending himself because he realised all his lawyers were corrupt and could not be trusted and decided the only way to try and obtain a fair hearing was to represent himself and expose all the powerful people he was the Bag Man for all their millions in cash money transactions for many years in Australia. Those that Laurie Connel could expose, just like the London Metropolitan Police could not allow Sean Hoare to be alive on the morning of the 19th July, 2011 to give evidence to the Parliamentary Select Committee on the 19th July, 2011 , simply could not allow Laurie Connel ( known as the Lender of the Last Resort) to live and tell his story...to the court and expose all those powerful people...






20th July 2011

Sean Hoare looks likely to take his place behind Princess Diana and David Kelly in the roll call of controversial deaths. Within hours of reports of his untimely demise, conspiracy theorists were questioning whether he had been murdered.

 

"Another murder cover-up?" asked one online. Another wrote: "Nothing that the British police can say will convince me that Sean Hoare's death was natural causes."

The decision of many newspapers, but not The Independent, to splash on the sensational death of the "phone-hacking whistleblower" posed the question in some readers' minds: was this man killed by the Murdoch empire? The answer is – unexcitedly but almost certainly – "no".

True, we do not yet have all the facts, but there are many reasons why Mr Hoare's death presents no more of a conspiracy than the failure of Princess Diana to fasten her seatbelt while being driven through the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris in 1997.

Firstly, Mr Hoare was not in possession of unique information about the wrongdoing at the News of the World, nor was he the only one to point the finger at Andy Coulson, its former editor. During its excellent investigation into the "hack attack" last year, The New York Times spoke to 12 current or former NOTW staff, who said hacking was rife.

Secondly, the new inquiry into phone hacking, Operation Weeting, was always unlikely to base its case on the testimony of one ex-employee. While statements may form part of its case, a much bigger part will rely on emails discovered or forensically recovered from News International's digital archive, electronic payment invoices and phone records.

Even if Weeting were to make personal testimony central, it was unlikely to have been Mr Hoare's, since he had been dismissed from the NOTW for drink and drug problems and could be portrayed as an unreliable witness.

Thirdly, the (unspoken but tangible) suggestion that News International might want to send death squads scuttling round Britain to silence witnesses is absurd, and especially so given the trouble it already faces.

Notwithstanding its dark arts, deceit and links to criminals, NI's new strategy is PR-led; it wants to now co-operate with the police and apologise for the mess.

Fourthly, Mr Hoare's death is not being investigated by the Metropolitan Police but by the Hertfordshire force, whose statement that the death was not thought to be suspicious was probably a disappointment to Hertfordshire's best detectives, who may have been only too keen to get one over on their big city colleagues.

Finally, Mr Hoare was not in good health. He was reported to be looking yellow and his doctor had remarked that he should have been dead.

And this is where Mr Hoare almost certainly was a "victim" of News International. He was told to do whatever it took to get the story; he went on marathon benders and snorted coke with rock stars. He had some great times as a show business journalist. But he decided to tell the truth about the illegal methods used to land stories. In that he was brave, and that is what he should be remembered for, not the manner of his passing.


The decision of many newspapers, but not The Independent, to splash on the sensational death of the "phone-hacking whistleblower" posed the question in some readers' minds: was this man killed by the Murdoch empire? The answer is – unexcitedly but almost certainly – "no".

True, we do not yet have all the facts, but there are many reasons why Mr Hoare's death presents no more of a conspiracy than the failure of Princess Diana to fasten her seatbelt while being driven through the Pont de l'Alma road tunnel in Paris in 1997.

Firstly, Mr Hoare was not in possession of unique information about the wrongdoing at the News of the World, nor was he the only one to point the finger at Andy Coulson, its former editor. During its excellent investigation into the "hack attack" last year, The New York Times spoke to 12 current or former NOTW staff, who said hacking was rife.

Secondly, the new inquiry into phone hacking, Operation Weeting, was always unlikely to base its case on the testimony of one ex-employee. While statements may form part of its case, a much bigger part will rely on emails discovered or forensically recovered from News International's digital archive, electronic payment invoices and phone records.

Even if Weeting were to make personal testimony central, it was unlikely to have been Mr Hoare's, since he had been dismissed from the NOTW for drink and drug problems and could be portrayed as an unreliable witness.

Thirdly, the (unspoken but tangible) suggestion that News International might want to send death squads scuttling round Britain to silence witnesses is absurd, and especially so given the trouble it already faces.

Notwithstanding its dark arts, deceit and links to criminals, NI's new strategy is PR-led; it wants to now co-operate with the police and apologise for the mess.

Fourthly, Mr Hoare's death is not being investigated by the Metropolitan Police but by the Hertfordshire force, whose statement that the death was not thought to be suspicious was probably a disappointment to Hertfordshire's best detectives, who may have been only too keen to get one over on their big city colleagues.

Finally, Mr Hoare was not in good health. He was reported to be looking yellow and his doctor had remarked that he should have been dead.

And this is where Mr Hoare almost certainly was a "victim" of News International. He was told to do whatever it took to get the story; he went on marathon benders and snorted coke with rock stars. He had some great times as a show business journalist. But he decided to tell the truth about the illegal methods used to land stories. In that he was brave, and that is what he should be remembered for, not the manner of his passing.

 







Head of Met press admits they employ 10 ex News of the World journalists

THE Met Police’s communications boss yesterday admitted 10 out of 45 press office staff used to work at the News of the World.

Dick Fedorcio also told the Select Committee he never asked former NoW deputy editor Neil Wallis about phone hacking before taking him on as a consultant. He instead claimed assistant commissioner John Yates, a friend of Mr Wallis, undertook a process of due ­diligence in vetting him.

But when quizzed by MPs, Mr Yates said this was “over-egging the pudding” and the tendering process was ultimately down to Mr Fedorcio. Asked if he would have appointed Mr Wallis in hindsight, Mr Fedorcio said: “Certainly not”, adding he could not remember who suggested Mr Wallis for the job but denied it was then-News International chief Rebekah Brooks.

Mr Fedorcio also said he was “dismayed” at reports he favoured the NoW when placing stories, even though almost a quarter of his staff were ex-employees. The Met has referred his dealings with Mr Wallis to the ­Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Meanwhile, former Met chief Sir Paul Stephenson yesterday said he resigned to prevent continuing damaging speculation over his role in the scandal in the run-up to the London Olympics.



Read more: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2011/07/20/head-of-met-press-admits-they-employ-10-ex-news-of-the-world-journalists-115875-23283025/#ixzz1Scyn6AAr 
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Read more: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2011/07/20/head-of-met-press-admits-they-employ-10-ex-news-of-the-world-journalists-115875-23283025/#ixzz1ScyiKfBH 
Go Camping for 95p! Vouchers collectable in the Daily and Sunday Mirror until 11th August . Click here for more information


Read more: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2011/07/20/head-of-met-press-admits-they-employ-10-ex-news-of-the-world-journalists-115875-23283025/#ixzz1ScyTwOTw 
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Brooks: hacking payments not my remit

Rebekah Brooks gives evidence on phone hacking

Former News International chief says News of the World's managing editor approved payments to private detectives. By John Plunkett


NoW whistleblower found dead

Sean Hoare

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News of the World phone-hacking whistleblower found dead

Death of Sean Hoare – who was first named journalist to allege Andy Coulson knew of hacking – not being treated as suspicious

 

 


Sean Hoare
Hoare first made his claims in a New York Times investigation into the phone-hacking allegations at the News of the World. Photograph: Hazel Thompson/Eyevine

Sean Hoare, the former News of the World showbusiness reporter who was the first named journalist to allege that Andy Coulson was aware of phone hacking by his staff, has been found dead .

Hoare, who worked on the Sun and the News of the World with Coulson before being dismissed for drink and drugs problems, was said to have been found at his Watford home.

Hertfordshire police would not confirm his identity, but said in a statement: "At 10.40am today [Monday 18 July] police were called to Langley Road, Watford, following the concerns for the welfare of a man who lives at an address on the street. Upon police and ambulance arrival at a property, the body of a man was found. The man was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after.

"The death is currently being treated as unexplained but not thought to be suspicious. Police investigations into this incident are ongoing."

There was an unexplained delay in the arrival of forensics officers at the scene.

Neighbours said three police cars and two ambulances arrived at the property shortly before 11am. They left around four hours later, around 3pm, shortly after a man and a woman, believed to be grieving relatives, arrived at the premises. There was no police presence at the scene at all for several hours.

The curtains were drawn at the first-floor apartment in a new-build block of flats.

At about 9.15pm, three hours after the Guardian revealed Hoare had been found dead a police van marked "Scientific Services Unit" pulled up at the address, where a police car was already parked. Two officers emerged carrying evidence bags, clipboards, torches and laptop-style bags and entered the building. Three officers carrying cameras and wearing white forensic suits went into the flat at around 9.30pm.

Hoare was in his mid-40s. He first made his claims in a New York Times investigation into the phone-hacking allegations  at the News of the World. He told the newspaper that not only did Coulson know of the hacking, but he also actively encouraged his staff to intercept the calls of celebrities in the pursuit of exclusives.

In a subsequent interview with the BBC he alleged he was personally asked by his editor at the time, Coulson, to tap into phones. In an interview with the PM programme he said Coulson's insistence he did not know of the practice was "a lie, it is simply a lie". At the time a Downing Street spokeswoman said Coulson totally and utterly denied the allegations; he had "never condoned the use of phone hacking and nor do I have any recollection of incidences where hacking took place".

Hoare said he was once a close friend of Coulson's, and told the New York Times the two first worked together at the Sun, where, Hoare said, he played recordings of hacked messages for Coulson. At the News of the World, Hoare said, he continued to inform Coulson of his activities. He "actively encouraged me to do it", Hoare said. In September last year he was interviewed under caution by police over his claim the former Tory communications chief asked him to hack into phones when editor of the paper, but declined to make any comment.

Hoare returned to the spotlight last week, after he told the New York Times that reporters at the NoW were able to use police technology to locate people using their mobile phone signals, in exchange for payments to police officers. He said journalists were able to use "pinging", which measured the distance between a mobile handset and a number of phone masts to pinpoint its location.

Hoare gave further details about "pinging" to the Guardian last week. He described how reporters would ask a news desk executive to obtain the location of a target: "Within 15 to 30 minutes someone on the news desk would come back and say 'Right, that's where they are.'"

He said: "You'd just go to the news desk and they'd come back to you. You don't ask any questions. You'd consider it a job done.

"The chain of command is one of absolute discipline, and that's why I never bought into it, like with Andy saying he wasn't aware of it and all that. That's bollocks."

He said he stood by everything he told the New York Times of "pinging". "I don't know how often it happened. That would be wrong of me. But if I had access, as a humble reporter … "

He admitted he had had problems with drink and drugs, and had been in rehab. "But that's irrelevant," he said. "There's more to come. This is not going to go away."

Hoare named a private investigator who he said had links with the News of the World, adding: "He may want to talk now, because I think what you'll find now is a lot of people are going to want to cover their arse." Speaking to another Guardian journalist last week, Hoare repeatedly expressed the hope that the hacking scandal would lead to journalism in general being cleaned up, and said he had decided to blow the whistle on the activities of some of his former NoW colleagues with that aim in mind.

He also said he had been injured the previous weekend while taking down a marquee erected for a children's party. He said he broke his nose and badly injured his foot when a relative accidentally struck him with a pole from the marquee. Hoare also emphasised that he was not making any money from telling his story.

Having been treated for drug and alcohol problems, Hoare reminisced about his partying with former pop stars and said that he missed the days when he was able to go out on the town.

On Monday evening the curtains were drawn at his home, a first-floor apartment in a new-build block of flats.

A neighbour living opposite, Nicky Dormer, said three police cars and two ambulances arrived at the property at 11am; police left at 3pm, shortly after a man and a woman, believed to be grieving relatives, arrived at the premises.

She and another neighbour described Hoare as a jovial man who would often sit on his balcony, overlooking the block entrance, and talk to residents. They said he lived in the block with his partner, a woman called Jo, who they believed had been away on holiday. Neither had seen Hoare for a few days.

Paul Pritchard, 30, another neighbour, said Sean Hoare was "the most sociable" resident, and they would regularly see him watering the communal front lawn.

"It is just such a shock. About a month ago he said he felt unwell and he said he went to the doctors for a checkup. Then I saw him again and he seemed well."

Sean Hoare

Sean Hoare death: postmortem being held

Detectives seek to discover preliminary cause of death of former News of the World journalist who spoke out about Andy Coulson. By Paul Lewis


Sean Hoare

Sean Hoare death: postmortem being held

Detectives seek to discover preliminary cause of death of former News of the World journalist who spoke out about Andy Coulson. By Paul Lewis


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/19/sean-hoare-hacking-whistleblower-postmortem

Sean Hoare death: postmortem being held on hacking whistleblower

Detectives seek to discover preliminary cause of death of former News of the World journalist who spoke out about Andy Coulson

Home of Sean Hoare, former reporter for the News of the World,
The Watford home of Sean Hoare, the former reporter for the News of the World who has been found dead. Photograph: Jonathan Hordle/Rex Features

A postmortem on the body of Sean Hoare, the News of the Worldwhistleblower found dead on Monday, is expected to provide a preliminary cause of death.

Police are treating the death of Hoare, 47, as "unexplained but not thought to be suspicious". Hoare was the first named journalist to allege that Andy Coulson, the former News of the World editor, was aware of phone hacking by his staff.

Hoare worked for the Sun and NoW with Coulson before being dismissed for drink and drugs problems, and had spoken openly to a number of news organisations about the practice of phone hacking.

Detectives from Hertfordshire police's major crimes unit are running the investigation because of the high profile of Hoare's death.

They are understood to be awaiting the outcome of the postmortem, due to begin at 2pm on Tuesday, while seeking to establish the last time he was seen alive.

The force said in a statement: "Police investigations continue into the unexplained death of a man who, whilst formal identification is yet to take place, police believe to be Sean Hoare. The postmortem is set to take place today [Tuesday]. The man's next of kin have been informed and the family are being supported by police at this sad time."

The former tabloid journalist is understood to have lived at the first floor flat in Watford with his partner, Jo. Hoare's body was found in the flat at 10.40am on Monday. Neighbours described seeing police and ambulance at the scene until about 3pm.

It was not until after 9pm, two hours after news broke that the phone-hacking whistleblower had been found dead, that more uniformed and plainclothes police arrived at the scene. At about 9.15pm, a police van marked Scientific Services Unit pulled up at the address, where a police car was already parked.

Two officers emerged carrying evidence bags, clipboards, torches and laptop-style bags and entered the building. Three officers carrying cameras and in white forensic suits followed at 9.30pm.

Police sources said that it was "not unusual" for a forensics team to investigate the scene of an unexplained death. The former showbusiness reporter struggled with drug and alcohol problems, and is known to have been unwell in recent weeks.

Hoare returned to the spotlight last Tuesday, after he told the New York Times that reporters at the NoW were able to use police technology to locate people using their mobile phone signals, in exchange for payments to police officers. He said journalists were able to purchase the mobile phone tracking data from police for just £300.

That evening he had dinner with two New York Times journalist involved in the story, Don Van Natta Jr and Jo Becker. Van Natta Jr tweeted on Monday night: "RIP Sean Hoare. Jo Becker and I had dinner with him last Tues night. He was ailing but defiant and funny. And no regrets. All-courage."

Hoare gave further details about so-called "pinging" to Guardian journalists on Tuesday and Wednesday. He described how reporters would ask a newsdesk executive to obtain the location of a target. He said: "Within 15 to 30 minutes someone on the newsdesk would come back and say 'Right, that's where they are.' "

He added: "You'd just go to the newsdesk and they'd come back to you. You don't ask any questions. You'd consider it a job done."

Hoare repeatedly expressed the hope that the hacking scandal would lead to journalism in general being cleaned up, and said he had decided to blow the whistle on the activities of some of his former NoW colleagues with that aim in mind.

Repeated calls to Hoare's home telephone number on Thursday and Friday went unanswered.

Sean Hoare

Journalists remember 'old fashioned Fleet Street character'

 

Colleagues pay tribute after death of former News of the World entertainment correspondent who spoke out on phone hacking. By Hannah Godfrey


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/19/sean-hoare-journalists-tributes-news-of-the-world

Sean Hoare: journalists remember 'old fashioned Fleet Street character'

Colleagues pay tribute after death of former News of the World entertainment correspondent who spoke out on phone hacking

Sean Hoare
Sean Hoare, a tabloid reporter who worked at the Sun and the People as well as the News of the World, in his sitting room at home. Photograph: Hazel Thompson /eyevine

Former colleagues have been paying tribute to Sean Hoare, the formerNews of the World entertainment correspondent who was found dead at his Watford home on Monday.

David Yelland, who edited the Sun from 1998 to 2003, used Twitter to say: "Sean Hoare was trying to be honest, struggling with addiction. But he was a good man. My God."

Ben Proctor, who worked with Hoare over many years and was most recently deputy editor of the People, recalled him fondly as "an old fashioned Fleet Street character".

"Typically with Sean he managed to became close to Liam Gallagher. Liam even helped Sean's fledgling freelance career when the News of the World cut him adrift, offering to assist him with background info on a book about Oasis," he said.

Proctor told the Guardian that Hoare was "imbued with an incredible earthy charm", as well as being a great reporter.

"Like a cross between Arthur Daley and Del Trotter, you could always rely on Sean to persuade people to part with the facts."

Hoare, said Proctor, was a journalist of traditional vintage: "An old fashioned Fleet Street character, always in the pub but always with a story."

Though the most of the tributes were warm, Proctor portrayed a man with some hard edges:

"When I first met him he offered to break my knee caps over some 'creative differences'. But another time, when word went round I had a problem, he was first to my home to lend support. I always loved him, everybody did."

Others who worked alongside Hoare recounted fond memories from when they were young and green.

They included the Guardian's columnist Marina Hyde, who worked as a secretary at the Sun, and wrote on Twitter: "Utterly tragic news about my friend Sean Hoare, the first journalist to speak to me when I started as a secretary ... He continued to be kind to me until the very end, and he was more special than I can possibly say."

Simon Ricketts, a Guardian journalist, recalled on Twitter that Hoare was "a lovely generous man" who took him under his wing as a work experience reporter on a local paper: "He handed me a story on a plate. I went out to investigate, got all my notes and got back to the office and started to write it."

"I finished and Sean had a look. He got my notebook, extracted the best quotes, the one's I'd left in the notebook. He tickled, edited and expanded my story.

"By the time he'd finished, it was 100 times better. It got put on the front page of the paper. Sean insisted that my name go on the story. When the paper came out, he walked over with a copy. He gave me it with a flourish. "Congratulations on your first-ever splash," he said."

Ricketts concludes, "I shall raise a glass or 12 tonight to him."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/18/pa-journalist-phone-hacking-no-action

PA journalist arrested over phone hacking faces no further action

Laura Elston, a royal reporter for the Press Association, dropped from inquiry after police speak to Clarence House

Paddy Harverson
According to reports, Laura Elston was arrested on suspicion of hacking the voicemails of Paddy Harverson, pictured, Prince Charles's spokesman. Clarence House reportedly told police she was innocent. Photograph: John Peters/PA

A journalist arrested by police investigating phone hacking at the News of the World faces no further action, her lawyer said on Monday.

Laura Elston, 34, who works for the Press Association news agency, was held for several hours on 27 June when she voluntarily went to a central London police station.

Her solicitor, David Corker, said he had been told she faced no further action: "She has been dropped from the inquiry."

Scotland Yard confirmed a 34-year-old arrested in June had had her bail cancelled and been told she faced no further action.

Elston had been questioned on suspicion of intercepting communications, contrary to section 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, and was the only journalist arrested so far with no known News International links.

Elston works as a royal correspondent and was originally released on police bail until October. She joined the organisation as a graduate trainee in 2000.

PA editor Jonathan Grun said: "Laura Elston is a journalist of integrity who has had a distinguished career since joining us as a trainee more than a decade ago. We are pleased that this matter has been cleared up."

She was interviewed by detectives on Operation Weeting, the investigation launched by the Metropolitan police in January following new allegations of phone hacking.

According to the Sunday Mirror, Elston was arrested on suspicion of hacking the voicemails of Prince Charles's spokesman Paddy Harverson.

The allegation related to Elston's phone being used to call Harverson when they were both in Lesotho in 2006.

The paper said it understood Harverson told police he borrowed her phone to access voicemails because his own mobile was not working.

Clarence House was reportedly satisfied Elston did nothing criminal and told detectives she was innocent.

Clarence House, the official residence of the Prince of Wales, declined to comment on the claim on Monday.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/19/phone-hacking-paul-dacre-brooks

Paul Dacre accused Rebekah Brooks of trying to 'tear down' British press

Former Sun editor launched strategy designed to spread the blame for hacking to other papers, according to reports

Paul Dacre
Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre said he received reports that News International executives had encouraged celebrities to investigate whether their phones had been hacked by Mail newspapers. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA

Paul Dacre, editor of the Daily Mail, told senior managers he had received reports from PR agencies, footballers and others that News International executives had encouraged them to investigate whether their phones had been hacked by Mail group newspapers, according to the New York Times.

Based on interviews said to have been carried out with former News International staff, the New York Times also claimed Rebekah Brooks had spearheaded a strategy in recent months that appeared designed to spread the blame for hacking across Fleet Street. Several former NoW journalists claimed she asked them to dig up evidence of hacking by others, while one said Brooks's target was not her own newspapers, but those of her rivals.

In an account relayed to his management team, Dacre confronted Brooks at a hotel, telling her: "You are trying to tear down the entire industry."

Lady Claudia Rothermere, wife of the owner of the Mail, was also said to have overheard Brooks say at a dinner party that the Mail was just as culpable as the NoW.

"We didn't break the law," Lady Rothermere said, according to two sources who spoke to the New York Times. Brooks was said to have asked who Rothermere thought she was – "Mother Teresa?"

By the middle of last year, News International's lawyers and some executives were also said to have been urging that the company accept some responsibility – but Brooks disagreed. "Her behaviour all along has been resist, resist, resist," one company official was reported to have said. The US newspaper reported that Rupert Murdoch wanted to "fly commercial to London," so that he might be seen as a man of the people as he prepared to leave a conference in Idaho and come to the UK to take charge of the crisis enveloping his media empire.

He was said to have been told that would hardly do the trick, and Murdoch instead arrived in the UK on a Gulfstream G550 private jet.

Former company executives and political aides also told the New York Times that News International executives engaged in a campaign of selective leaks implicating previous management and the police.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/18/daily-mail-would-not-use-phone-hacking-blagging

Daily Mail would not use phone hacking or 'blagging', says Paul Dacre

Editor-in-chief tells MPs that PCC needs radical reform and defamation law is having 'chilling effect' on UK's newspapers

Paul Dacre
Paul Dacre said the Daily Mail would never 'countenance' using phone hacking or 'blagging'. Photograph: Ben Birchall/PA Wire/PA Photos


The Daily Mail has never knowingly published a story based on information gleaned from phone hacking or "blagging", the paper's editor, Paul Dacre, told MPs on Monday.

 

Dacre, the editor-in-chief of Daily Mail publisher Associated Newspapers, told a joint parliamentary select committee on defamation law reform that he had "absolutely not" published a story he knew was based on unlawfully-accessed material.

 

Asked by Baroness Hayter whether he had ever "countenanced" phone hacking or blagging – a phrase used to cover a range of techniques used to get hold of private information – in his 19 years at the Mail, Dacre said: "No."

 

Asked whether unlawful newsgathering techniques could ever be justified, he said: "Goodness me, deep waters. I have considerable sympathy that if there's a great public interest then those methods can be justified."

 

However, he added later: "I don't think you should ever use hacking or blagging as a [public interest] defence because they're criminal offences."

 

Dacre made the rare public appearance to give evidence before a joint Commons and Lords committee on the government's draft defamation bill.

 

Fleet Street's longest-serving editor and a longtime supporter of the Press Complaints Commission, conceded that the self-regulatory body needed to be "radically reformed". But he conceded that it was the "least imperfect system known to man".

 

The Daily Mail editor is the chairman of the editors' code of practice committee, which formulates the PCC's guidelines for newspapers and magazines.

 

Dacre described defamation law in the UK as having a "chilling effect" on newspapers, adding that it had got "exponentially worse" in recent years. "There's not a day goes by when predatory lawyers don't try it on, encouraged by vast sums of money which can be made – most of which goes to them."

 

He added: "The law is becoming more and more onerous and journalists are having to become more and more respectful so it is having a chilling effect."

 

In April 2009, Dacre revealed that the Daily Mail had recently sacked a journalist for unauthorised use of a private detective to obtain illegal information about people.

 

An investigation by the information commissioner in December 2006revealed that more than 50 Daily Mail journalists had paid private detectives to obtain 982 pieces of information about celebrities and other individuals.

 

Associated Newspaper dismissed the investigation, dubbed Operation Motorman, at the time as "utterly meaningless" as it was a snapshot based on the activities of one private detective agency, run by Steve Whittamore. Whittamore, sold information he obtained from the police national computer until he was exposed and convicted in 2005.

 

The Daily Mail came out on top of a list of newspapers that had used Whittamore's services. Others included the Mail's Associated Newspapers stablemate the Mail on Sunday, the Sunday People, Daily Mirror, Sunday Times and Observer (which is published by Guardian News & Media).

 

When the information commissioner's report was published in late 2006 an Associated spokesman said the publisher "in common with all newspapers and broadcasters, and many other organisations, including lawyers, use search agencies to obtain information entirely legitimately from a range of public sources ... In addition, the law specifically makes provision for journalists making inquiries in the public interest".

 

Dacre told the Commons culture, media and sport select committee in 2009 that following the information commissioner's 2006 report, the Daily Mail had banned reporters from using outside agents to supply personal information following, except in cases of overwhelming public interest.

 

• To contact the MediaGuardian news desk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 3353 3857. For all other inquiries please call the main Guardian switchboard on 020 3353 2000. If you are writing a comment for publication, please mark clearly "for publication".

 


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/18/sean-hoare-news-of-the-world

Sean Hoare knew how destructive the News of the World could be

The courageous whistleblower who claimed Andy Coulson knew about phone hacking had a powerful motive for speaking out


Andy Coulson
Sean Hoare worked with Andy Coulson (above) at the Sun and News of the World, but was later fired by him. Photograph: Lewis Whyld/PA

At a time when the reputation of News of the World journalists is at rock bottom, it needs to be said that the paper's former showbusiness correspondent Sean Hoare, who died on Monday, was a lovely man.

In the saga of the phone-hacking scandal, he distinguished himself by being the first former NoW journalist to come out on the record, telling the New York Times last year that his former friend and editor, Andy Coulson, had actively encouraged him to hack into voicemail.

That took courage. But he had a particularly powerful motive for speaking. He knew how destructive the News of the World could be, not just for the targets of its exposés, but also for the ordinary journalists who worked there, who got caught up in its remorseless drive for headlines.

Explaining why he had spoken out, he told me: "I want to right a wrong, lift the lid on it, the whole culture. I know, we all know, that the hacking and other stuff is endemic. Because there is so much intimidation. In the newsroom, you have people being fired, breaking down in tears, hitting the bottle."

He knew this very well, because he was himself a victim of the News of the World. As a showbusiness reporter, he had lived what he was happy to call a privileged life. But the reality had ruined his physical health: "I was paid to go out and take drugs with rock stars – get drunk with them, take pills with them, take cocaine with them. It was so competitive. You are going to go beyond the call of duty. You are going to do things that no sane man would do. You're in a machine."

While it was happening, he loved it. He came from a working-class background of solid Arsenal supporters, always voted Labour, defined himself specifically as a "clause IV" socialist who still believed in public ownership of the means of production. But, working as a reporter, he suddenly found himself up to his elbows in drugs and delirium.

He rapidly arrived at the Sun's Bizarre column, then run by Coulson. He recalled: "There was a system on the Sun. We broke good stories. I had a good relationship with Andy. He would let me do what I wanted as long as I brought in a story. The brief was, 'I don't give a fuck'."

He was a born reporter. He could always find stories. And, unlike some of his nastier tabloid colleagues, he did not play the bully with his sources. He was naturally a warm, kind man, who could light up a lamp-post with his talk. From Bizarre, he moved to the Sunday People, under Neil Wallis, and then to the News of the World, where Andy Coulson had become deputy editor. And, persistently, he did as he was told and went out on the road with rock stars, befriending them, bingeing with them, pausing only to file his copy.

He made no secret of his massive ingestion of drugs. He told me how he used to start the day with "a rock star's breakfast" – a line of cocaine and a Jack Daniels – usually in the company of a journalist who now occupies a senior position at the Sun. He reckoned he was using three grammes of cocaine a day, spending about £1,000 a week. Plus endless alcohol. Looking back, he could see it had done him enormous damage. But at the time, as he recalled, most of his colleagues were doing it, too.

"Everyone got overconfident. We thought we could do coke, go to Brown's, sit in the Red Room with Paula Yates and Michael Hutchence. Everyone got a bit carried away."

It must have scared the rest of Fleet Street when he started talking – he had bought, sold and snorted cocaine with some of the most powerful names in tabloid journalism. One retains a senior position on the Daily Mirror. "I last saw him in Little Havana," he recalled, "at three in the morning, on his hands and knees. He had lost his cocaine wrap. I said to him, 'This is not really the behaviour we expect of a senior journalist from a great Labour paper.' He said, 'Have you got any fucking drugs?'"

And the voicemail hacking was all part of the great game. The idea that it was a secret, or the work of some "rogue reporter", had him rocking in his chair: "Everyone was doing it. Everybody got a bit carried away with this power that they had. No one came close to catching us." He would hack messages and delete them so the competition could not hear them, or hack messages and swap them with mates on other papers.

In the end, his body would not take it any more. He said he started to have fits, that his liver was in such a terrible state that a doctor told him he must be dead. And, as his health collapsed, he was sacked by the News of the World – by his old friend Coulson.

When he spoke out about the voicemail hacking, some Conservative MPs were quick to smear him, spreading tales of his drug use as though that meant he was dishonest. He was genuinely offended by the lies being told by News International and always willing to help me and other reporters who were trying to expose the truth. He was equally offended when Scotland Yard's former assistant commissioner, John Yates, assigned officers to interview him, not as a witness but as a suspect. They told him anything he said could be used against him, and, to his credit, he refused to have anything to do with them.

His health never recovered. He liked to say that he had stopped drinking, but he would treat himself to some red wine. He liked to say he didn't smoke any more, but he would stop for a cigarette on his way home. For better and worse, he was a Fleet Street man.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/jul/19/news-corp-police-payments-macdonald

News Corp board shocked at evidence of payments to police, says former DPP

Lord Macdonald tells committee it took him 'three to five minutes' to decide NoW emails had to be passed to police

Lord Macdonald
Lord Macdonald was in charge of the CPS when the phone-hacking prosecution of the NoW’s royal correspondent took place. Photograph: Tim Ireland/PA

"Blindingly obvious" evidence of corrupt payments to police officers was found by the former director of public prosecutions, Lord Macdonald, when he inspected News of the World emails, the home affairs select committee was told.

Explaining how he had been called in by solicitors acting for Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation board, Lord Macdonald said that when he inspected the messages it took him between "three to five minutes" to decide that the material had to be passed to police.

"The material I saw was so blindingly obvious that trying to argue that it should not be given to the police would have been a hard task. It was evidence of serious criminal offences."

He first showed it to the News Corp board in June this year. "There was no dissent," he recalled. "They were stunned. They were shocked. I said it was my unequivocal advice that it should be handed to the police. They accepted that."

That board meeting, the former DPP said, was chaired by Rupert Murdoch.

Lord Macdonald shortly afterwards gave the material to Assistant Commissioner Cressida Dick at the Metropolitan police. The nine or 10 emails passed over led to the launch of Operation Elveden, the police investigation into corrupt payments to officers for information.

Lord Macdonald, who had been in charge of the Crown Prosecution Service when the phone-hacking prosecution of the NoW's royal correspondent took place, said he had only been alerted to the case due to the convention that the DPP is always notified of crimes involving the royal family.

Members of the committee were highly critical of the CPS's narrow definition of what constituted phone hacking, claiming that it was at odds with the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.

Mark Reckless, the Conservative MP for Rochester, said that the original police investigation was hindered by the advice from the CPS that phone hacking was only an offence if messages had been intercepted before they were listened to by the intended recipient. However, Reckless said, a clause in the RIPA makes it an offence to hack in to messages even if they have already been heard.

Keir Starmer, the current DPP, said that the police had been told that "the RIPA legislation was untested". Listening to messages before they had been heard by the intended recipient was illegal, the police were told, but the question of whether intercepting them afterwards constituted a crime was "untested", he said.

Mark Lewis, the solicitor who has followed the scandal since its start, said he was the first person to lose his job over the affair when the firm in which he was a partner said it no longer wished him to pursue other victims' claims.

Lewis also told MPs that he had been threatened by lawyers acting for John Yates, the former assistant commissioner at the Metropolitan police, because of comments he had made about phone hacking.

"I have copies of a letter from Carter Ruck [solicitors] threatening to sue me on behalf of John Yates," Lewis told the home affairs select committee. He said the Guardian and the Labour MP Chris Bryant had also received threats of being sued. "The costs of the action were paid for by the Metropolitan Police, by the taxpayer," he added.

Lewis said the reason for the investigation taking so long was not due solely to the police. "The DPP seems to have got it wrong and needs to be helped out," he said.


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  2. 2.Behind Rupert and James Murdoch's gloss, an intensely serious defence
  3. 3.News International 'deliberately' blocked investigation
  4. 4.Rupert Murdoch's phone-hacking humble pie
  5. 5.News Corp board shocked at evidence of payments to police, says former DPP